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What Powershell pitfalls you have fall into? :-)

Mine are:

# -----------------------------------
function foo()
{
    @("text")
}

# Expected 1, actually 4.
(foo).length

# -----------------------------------
if(@($null, $null))
{
    Write-Host "Expected to be here, and I am here."
}

if(@($null))
{
    Write-Host "Expected to be here, BUT NEVER EVER."
}

# -----------------------------------

function foo($a)
{
    # I thought this is right.
    #if($a -eq $null)
    #{
    #    throw "You can't pass $null as argument."
    #}

    # But actually it should be:
    if($null -eq $a)
    {
        throw "You can't pass $null as argument."
    }
}

foo @($null, $null)

# -----------------------------------

# There is try/catch, but no callstack reported.
function foo() 
{
   bar
}

function bar() 
{
  throw "test"
}

# Expected:
#  At bar() line:XX
#  At foo() line:XX
#  
# Actually some like this:
#  At bar() line:XX
foo

Would like to know yours to walk them around :-)

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2  
You should probably make this a community WIKI since it's a poll –  JaredPar Apr 29 '09 at 18:09
    
I second that recommendation. –  JasonMArcher Apr 29 '09 at 18:41
    
Edit it. At the lower right hand side (I think it is there) there will be a check box and it will say Community Wiki next to it. –  EBGreen Apr 29 '09 at 18:58
    
Indeed, makes sence. –  alex2k8 Apr 29 '09 at 19:01

20 Answers 20

My personal favorite is

function foo() {
  param ( $param1, $param2 = $(throw "Need a second parameter"))
  ...
}

foo (1,2)

For those unfamiliar with powershell that line throws because instead of passing 2 parameters it actually creates an array and passes one parameter. You have to call it as follows

foo 1 2
share|improve this answer
    
This brings back memories of how VB & VBScript handle parentheses around arguments. I can't find a handy reference but something like call func x,y,z and call func(x,y,z) were different –  Peter M Apr 29 '09 at 18:57
    
Call essentially ignores any return value and forces the use of (). Without call subs must not use () and functions must use (). –  EBGreen Apr 29 '09 at 19:01

Another fun one. Not handling an expression by default writes it to the pipeline. Really annoying when you don't realize a particular function returns a value.

function example() {
  param ( $p1 ) {
  if ( $p1 ) {
    42
  }
  "done"
}

PS> example $true 
42
"done"
share|improve this answer
$files = Get-ChildItem . -inc *.extdoesntexist
foreach ($file in $files) {
    "$($file.Fullname.substring(2))"
}

Fails with:

You cannot call a method on a null-valued expression.
At line:3 char:25
+ $file.Fullname.substring <<<< (2)

Fix it like so:

$files = @(Get-ChildItem . -inc *.extdoesntexist)
foreach ($file in $files) {
    "$($file.Fullname.substring(2))"
}

Bottom line is that the foreach statement will loop on a scalar value even if that scalar value is $null. When Get-ChildItem in the first example returns nothing, $files gets assinged $null. If you are expecting an array of items to be returned by a command but there is a chance it will only return 1 item or zero items, put @() around the command. Then you will always get an array - be it of 0, 1 or N items. Note: If the item is already an array putting @() has no effect - it will still be the very same array (i.e. there is no extra array wrapper).

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting, thank you! I have updated my response inspired by your answer. –  alex2k8 May 1 '09 at 19:54
# The pipeline doesn't enumerate hashtables.
$ht = @{"foo" = 1; "bar" = 2}
$ht | measure

# Workaround: call GetEnumerator
$ht.GetEnumerator() | measure
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Here are my top 5 PowerShell gotchas

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Here is something Ive stumble upon lately (PowerShell 2.0 CTP):

$items = "item0", "item1", "item2"

$part = ($items | select-string "item0")

$items = ($items | where {$part -notcontains $_})

what do you think that $items be at the end of the script?

I was expecting "item1", "item2" but instead the value of $items is: "item0", "item1", "item2".

share|improve this answer
    
You aren't changing the value of items after you first set it. So I would be surprised if it changed. :) –  JasonMArcher Apr 29 '09 at 18:39
    
I change the snippet so that it would make sense. –  Shay Erlichmen Apr 29 '09 at 18:48
1  
In that case, what is wrong is that $part contains a MatchInfo object. Since the MatchInfo object doesn't contain anything, the last comparison always returns true. –  JasonMArcher May 2 '09 at 23:49

alex2k8, I think this example of yours is good to talk about:

# -----------------------------------
function foo($a){
    # I thought this is right.
    #if($a -eq $null)
    #{
    #    throw "You can't pass $null as argument."
    #}
    # But actually it should be:
    if($null -eq $a)
    {
        throw "You can't pass $null as argument." 
    }
}
foo @($null, $null)

PowerShell can use some of the comparators against arrays like this:

$array -eq $value
## Returns all values in $array that equal $value

With that in mind, the original example returns two items (the two $null values in the array), which evalutates to $true because you end up with a collection of more than one item. Reversing the order of the arguments stops the array comparison.

This functionality is very handy in certain situations, but it is something you need to be aware of (just like array handling in PowerShell).

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Functions 'foo' and 'bar' looks equivalent.

function foo() { $null  }
function bar() { }

E.g.

(foo) -eq $null
# True

(bar) -eq $null
# True

But:

foo | %{ "foo" }
# Prints: foo

bar | %{ "bar" }
# PRINTS NOTHING

Returning $null and returning nothing is not equivalent dealing with pipes.


This one is inspired by Keith Hill example...

function bar() {}

$list = @(foo)
$list.length
# Prints: 0

# Now let's try the same but with a temporal variable.
$tmp = foo
$list = @($tmp)
$list.length
# Prints: 1
share|improve this answer

Say you've got the following XML file:

<Root>
    <Child />
    <Child />
</Root>

Run this:

PS > $myDoc = [xml](Get-Content $pathToMyDoc)
PS > @($myDoc.SelectNodes("/Root/Child")).Count
2
PS > @($myDoc.Root.Child).Count
2

Now edit the XML file so it has no Child nodes, just the Root node, and run those statements again:

PS > $myDoc = [xml](Get-Content $pathToMyDoc)
PS > @($myDoc.SelectNodes("/Root/Child")).Count
0
PS > @($myDoc.Root.Child).Count
1

That 1 is annoying when you want to iterate over a collection of nodes using foreach if and only if there actually are any. This is how I learned that you cannot use the XML handler's property (dot) notation as a simple shortcut. I believe what's happening is that SelectNodes returns a collection of 0. When @'ed, it is transformed from an XPathNodeList to an Object[] (check GetType()), but the length is preserved. The dynamically generated $myDoc.Root.Child property (which essentially does not exist) returns $null. When $null is @'ed, it becomes an array of length 1.

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On Functions...

  • The subtleties of processing pipeline input in a function with respect to using $_ or $input and with respect to the begin, process, and end blocks.
  • How to handle the six principal equivalence classes of input delivered to a function (no input, null, empty string, scalar, list, list with null and/or empty) -- for both direct input and pipeline input -- and get what you expect.
  • The correct calling syntax for sending multiple arguments to a function.

I discuss these points and more at length in my Simple-Talk.com article Down the Rabbit Hole- A Study in PowerShell Pipelines, Functions, and Parameters and also provide an accompanying wallchart--here is a glimpse showing the various calling syntax pitfalls for a function taking 3 arguments: function syntax pitfalls


On Modules...

These points are expounded upon in my Simple-Talk.com article Further Down the Rabbit Hole: PowerShell Modules and Encapsulation.

  • Dot-sourcing a file inside a script using a relative path is relative to your curent directory -- not the directory where the script resides! To be relative to the script use this function to locate your script directory:

    function Get-ScriptDirectory { Split-Path $script:MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path }

  • Modules must be stored as ...Modules\name\name.psm1 or ...\Modules\any_subpath\name\name.psm1. That is, you cannot just use ...Modules\name.psm1 -- the name of the immediate parent of the module must match the base name of the module. This chart shows the various failure modes when this rule is violated:

module naming requirements

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I use \modules\name.psm1. I have to include the extension (import-module name.psm1) but that keeps most of my personal modules in the same folder rather than in dozens of separate sub-folders. –  Mike Shepard Oct 4 '11 at 19:04

Another one:

$x = 2
$y = 3
$a,$b = $x,$y*5

because of operators precedence there is not 25 in $b; the command is the same as ($x,$y)*5 the correct version is

$a,$b = $x,($y*5)
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The logical and bitwise operators don't follow standard precedence rules. The operator -and should have a higher priority than -or yet they're evaluated strictly left-to-right.

For example, compare logical operators between PowerShell and Python (or virtually any other modern language):

# PowerShell
PS> $true -or $false -and $false
False

# Python
>>> True or False and False
True

...and bitwise operators:

# PowerShell
PS> 1 -bor 0 -band 0
0

# Python
>>> 1 | 0 & 0
1
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There are some tricks to building command lines, particularly for utilities that were not built with Powershell in mind:

  • To run an executable who's name starts with a number or has to be quoted because the path name contains spaces, preface it with an Ampersand (&).

    & 7zip.exe

    & "c:\path with spaces\command with spaces.exe"

  • Wrap parameters in quotes, which do not start with a letter or dash (-), are not a proper number or that contain spaces.

    C:\Path\utility.exe "/parameter1" "parameter1's Value" '2nd value'

  • If you want to wait for the application you have to do one of several tricks, the simplest being consuming the output either by saving it to a variable or piping it to something. I usually pipe the output to Write-Output.

    $output = ping.exe example.com

    ping.exe example.com | Write-Output

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This works. But almost certainly not in the way you think it's working.

PS> $a = 42;
PS> [scriptblock]$b = { $a }
PS> & $b
42
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This one has tripped me up before, using $o.SomeProperty where it should be $($o.SomeProperty).

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2  
This is only and always the case within quoted strings. –  JasonMArcher May 1 '09 at 2:07
1  
And double-quoted strings at that since single quoted strings and here strings don't support variable expansion, sub-expressions or escape chars. –  Keith Hill Aug 22 '10 at 22:12
# $x is not defined
[70]: $x -lt 0
True
[71]: [int]$x -eq 0
True

So, what's $x..?

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Two different comparisons, the first is $null to 0, which appears to be less than 1. The second is comparing 0 to 0. Interestingly, $null is less than 0, but greater than any negative number. –  JasonMArcher May 1 '09 at 2:10
    
I know, that was the weird behaviour I wanted to point out. $x is less than 0 and equal to 0 at the same time. –  stej Jun 11 '09 at 22:09
1  
$x is $null since it is undefined, which means $x is all values when you do an inequality comparison it will always be true. When you force null to an int value it will be 0. –  JNK Oct 27 '10 at 13:29
    
I'm used to null (in db contexts) always forcing boolean results to false, rather than true. I'm surprised at this result in PowerShell. –  Mike Shepard Sep 1 '11 at 17:25

Another one I ran into recently: [string] parameters that accept pipeline input are not strongly typed in practice. You can pipe anything at all and PS will coerce it via ToString().

function Foo 
{
    [CmdletBinding()]
    param (
        [parameter(Mandatory=$True, ValueFromPipeline=$True)]
        [string] $param
    )

    process { $param }
}

get-process svchost | Foo

Unfortunately there is no way to turn this off. Best workaround I could think of:

function Bar
{
    [CmdletBinding()]
    param (
        [parameter(Mandatory=$True, ValueFromPipeline=$True)]
        [object] $param
    )

    process 
    { 
        if ($param -isnot [string]) {
            throw "Pass a string you fool!"
        }
        # rest of function goes here
    }
}

edit - a better workaround I've started using...

Add this to your custom type XML -

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<Types>
  <Type>
    <Name>System.String</Name>
    <Members>
      <ScriptProperty>
        <Name>StringValue</Name>
        <GetScriptBlock>
          $this
        </GetScriptBlock>
      </ScriptProperty>
    </Members>
  </Type>
</Types>

Then write functions like this:

function Bar
{
    [CmdletBinding()]
    param (
        [parameter(Mandatory=$True, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$True)]
        [Alias("StringValue")]
        [string] $param
    )

    process 
    { 
        # rest of function goes here
    }
}
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PowerShell will automatically do any coversion it needs to that is available. You can see this with DateTime as well. –  JasonMArcher May 8 '09 at 1:45

Forgetting that $_ gets overwritten in blocks made me scratch my head in confusion a couple times, and similarly for multiple reg-ex matches and the $matches array. >.<

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Remembering to explicitly type pscustom objects from imported data tables as numeric so they can be sorted correctly:

$CVAP_WA=foreach ($i in $C){[PSCustomObject]@{ `
                County=$i.county; `
                TotalVote=[INT]$i.TotalBallots; `
                RegVoters=[INT]$i.regvoters; `
                Turnout_PCT=($i.TotalBallots/$i.regvoters)*100; `
                CVAP=[INT]($B | ? {$_.GeoName -match $i.county}).CVAP_EST }}

PS C:\Politics> $CVAP_WA | sort -desc TotalVote |ft -auto -wrap

County       TotalVote RegVoters Turnout_PCT    CVAP CVAP_TV_PCT CVAP_RV_PCT
------       --------- --------- -----------    ---- ----------- -----------
King            973088   1170638      83.189 1299290      74.893      90.099
Pierce          349377    442985       78.86  554975      62.959      79.837
Snohomish       334354    415504      80.461  478440      69.832       86.81
Spokane         227007    282442      80.346  342060      66.398      82.555
Clark           193102    243155      79.453  284190      67.911       85.52
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Mine are both related to file copying...

Square Brackets in File Names
I once had to move a very large/complicated folder structure using Move-Item -Path C:\Source -Destination C:\Dest. At the end of the process there were still a number of files in source directory. I noticed that every remaining file had square brackets in the name.

The problem was that the -Path parameter treats square brackets as wildcards.
EG. If you wanted to copy Log001 to Log200, you could use square brackets as follows: Move-Item -Path C:\Source\Log[001-200].log.

In my case, to avoid square brackets being interpreted as wildcards, I should have used the -LiteralPath parameter.

ErrorActionPreference
The $ErrorActionPreference variable is ignored when using Move-Item and Copy-Item with the -Verbose parameter.

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