Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a file path.. Is there any single command to see the file/directory permissions of all the intermediate directories in the path..?

share|improve this question
    
ls -l /path doesnt work? –  Mustafa Ekici Nov 7 '11 at 11:03
    
Here, I just rewrote it for you (twice). This should work better. –  tchrist Nov 7 '11 at 14:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I know of one such command, but it is almost 30 years old although it still works fine. It should be rewritten in sh or perl, but this works:

#!/bin/csh -f
# pup - print all dir perms from here up to root

if ( $#argv == 0 ) then
        set args = ( $cwd )
else
        set args = ( $argv )
endif

@ mult = ( $#argv > 1 )

foreach dir ( $args )
        if ( $mult ) echo "${dir}:"
        loop:
                if ( "$dir" == '' ) set dir = '/'
                ls -lLd "$dir"
                if ( "$dir" == '/' ) goto next_for
                set dir = ( `echo "$dir" | sed 's;/[^/]*$;;'` )
                goto loop
next_for:
end

And here is an example of running it:

% pup /usr/src/usr.bin/vi/vi
drwxr-xr-x  3 root  wsrc  1024 May 29  2008 /usr/src/usr.bin/vi/vi
drwxr-xr-x  13 root  wsrc  512 Aug  7  2008 /usr/src/usr.bin/vi
drwxr-xr-x  229 root  wsrc  4096 Aug  7  2008 /usr/src/usr.bin
drwxrwxr-x  18 root  wsrc  512 Aug  7  2008 /usr/src
drwxr-xr-x  22 root  wheel  512 Jan 28  2010 /usr
drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /

It default to the cwd. Yes, the output is not pretty. If I get motivated this morning, maybe I’ll rewrite it.


EDIT

Here’s a rewrite that uses your system ls program. It has advantages in how it deals with symlinks:

#!/usr/bin/env perl    
use strict;
use warnings;

use Cwd                qw( getcwd   abs_path );
use File::Basename      qw( dirname  );

sub ls { 0 == system("ls", "-lid", @_) }

@ARGV = getcwd() unless @ARGV;

for my $path (@ARGV) {
    if (-l $path) {
        ls($path);
        $path = abs_path($path);
    }
    while (ls($path) && $path !~ m{ \A /+ \z }x) {
        $path = dirname(abs_path($path));
    }
}

exit;

But I really hate the way ls formats things. For example:

chthon(tchrist)% pup1 /dev/null /dev/zero /dev/tty /dev/stdin /dev/fd/0 ~ Mail
79283 crw-rw-rw-  1 root  wheel    2,   2 Nov  7 07:53 /dev/null
77953 drwxr-xr-x  3 root  wheel  22016 Oct 17 21:15 /dev
2 drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /
79284 crw-rw-rw-  1 root  wheel    2,  12 Oct 25  2008 /dev/zero
77953 drwxr-xr-x  3 root  wheel  22016 Oct 17 21:15 /dev
2 drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /
79280 crw-rw-rw-  1 root  wheel    1,   0 Nov  4 15:17 /dev/tty
77953 drwxr-xr-x  3 root  wheel  22016 Oct 17 21:15 /dev
2 drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /
79285 crw-rw-rw-  1 root  wheel   22,   0 Oct 25  2008 /dev/stdin
77953 drwxr-xr-x  3 root  wheel  22016 Oct 17 21:15 /dev
2 drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /
79308 crw-rw-rw-  1 root  wheel   22,   0 Oct 25  2008 /dev/fd/0
77954 dr-xr-xr-x  2 root  wheel  1024 Oct 25  2008 /dev/fd
77953 drwxr-xr-x  3 root  wheel  22016 Oct 17 21:15 /dev
2 drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /
1143296 drwxr-xr-x  197 tchrist  wheel  48128 Nov  7 07:53 /home/tchrist
2 drwxr-xr-x  15 root  wheel  512 Aug 12  2008 /home
2 drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /
1146538 lrwx------  1 root  wheel  5 Oct 23  2008 Mail -> /mail
2 drwxr-xr-x  134 tchrist  wheel  5120 Nov  7 07:43 /mail
2 drwxr-xr-x  21 root  wheel  1024 Aug 23  2010 /

See what I mean? So here’s one that’s entirely built-in.

Took me forever to track down the major/minor macros, since the ls routine I stole from find2perl. It probably won’t do these right on other systems than the ones I test for.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $USE_SHELL_LS_PROGRAM = 0;

use Cwd                qw( getcwd   abs_path );
use File::Basename      qw( dirname  );

@ARGV = getcwd() unless @ARGV;

*ls = $USE_SHELL_LS_PROGRAM ? \&your_ls : \&my_ls;

for my $path (@ARGV) {
    if (-l $path) { 
        ls($path);
        $path = abs_path($path);
    }
    while (ls($path) && $path !~ m{ \A /+ \z }x) { 
        $path = dirname(abs_path($path));
    }
} 

exit;

########

sub your_ls {
    0 == system("ls", "-lid", @_);
} 

sub my_ls {

    use POSIX           qw( strftime );

    my $name = shift();

    my @rwx = qw(--- --x -w- -wx r-- r-x rw- rwx);

    my ($dev,$ino,$mode,$nlink,$uid,$gid,$rdev,$size,
        $atime,$mtime,$ctime,$blksize,$blocks) = CORE::lstat($name) 
    or do {
        printf STDERR "$0: cannot lstat $name: $!\n";
        return 0;
    };

    my $pname = $name;

    $blocks
        or $blocks = int(($size + 1023) / 1024);

    my $perms = $rwx[$mode & 7];
    $mode >>= 3;
    $perms = $rwx[$mode & 7] . $perms;
    $mode >>= 3;
    $perms = $rwx[$mode & 7] . $perms;
    substr($perms, 2, 1) =~ tr/-x/Ss/ if -u _;
    substr($perms, 5, 1) =~ tr/-x/Ss/ if -g _;
    substr($perms, 8, 1) =~ tr/-x/Tt/ if -k _;
    if    (-f _) { $perms = '-' . $perms; }
    elsif (-d _) { $perms = 'd' . $perms; }
    elsif (-l _) { $perms = 'l' . $perms; $pname .= ' -> ' . readlink($name); }
    elsif (-c _) { $perms = 'c' . $perms; $size = sizemm($rdev); }
    elsif (-b _) { $perms = 'b' . $perms; $size = sizemm($rdev); }
    elsif (-p _) { $perms = 'p' . $perms; }
    elsif (-S _) { $perms = 's' . $perms; }
    else         { $perms = '?' . $perms; }

    printf "%9u %-10s %4d %-8s %-8s %8s %s %s\n",
            $ino,
                $perms,
                      $nlink,
                          user($uid),
                               group($gid),
                                    $size,
                                       strftime("%F %T", localtime $mtime),
                                            $pname;

    return 1;

}

sub sizemm {
    my $dev = shift;

    # these are almost always wrong:
    my $major = ($dev >> 8) & 0xff;
    my $minor = $dev & 0xff;

    # now fix the ones we know how to
    for ($^O) {

        if (/openbsd/) { 
            $major = ($dev >> 8) & 0xff;
            $minor = ($dev & 0xff) | (($dev & 0xffff0000) >> 8);
        }

        if (/darwin/) { 
            $major = ($dev >> 24) & 0xff;
            $minor = $dev & 0xffffff;
        }

        if (/solaris/) {
            $major = ($dev >> 18) & 0x3fff;
            $minor = $dev & 0x3ffff;
        }

        if (/linux/) {
            $major = (($dev >> 8) & 0xfff) | (($dev >> 32) & ~0xfff);
            $minor = ($dev & 0xff) | (($dev >> 12) & ~0xff);
        } 

    } 

    return sprintf("%3d, %3d", $major, $minor);

}

# cache user number to name conversions
sub user {
    use User::pwent;
    my $uid = shift;
    our %user;
    $user{$uid} = getpwuid($uid)->name || "#$uid"
        unless defined $user{$uid};
    return $user{$uid};
}

# cache group number to name conversions
sub group {
    use User::grent;
    my $gid = shift;
    our %group;
    $group{$gid} = getgrgid($gid)->name || "#$gid"
        unless defined $group{$gid};
    return $group{$gid};
}

For example:

chthon(tchrist)% pup2 /dev/null /dev/zero /dev/tty /dev/stdin /dev/fd/0 ~ Mail
    79283 crw-rw-rw-    1 root     wheel      2,   2 2011-11-07 07:34:47 /dev/null
    77953 drwxr-xr-x    3 root     wheel       22016 2011-10-17 21:15:55 /dev
        2 drwxr-xr-x   21 root     wheel        1024 2010-08-23 11:43:46 /
    79284 crw-rw-rw-    1 root     wheel      2,  12 2008-10-25 08:03:50 /dev/zero
    77953 drwxr-xr-x    3 root     wheel       22016 2011-10-17 21:15:55 /dev
        2 drwxr-xr-x   21 root     wheel        1024 2010-08-23 11:43:46 /
    79280 crw-rw-rw-    1 root     wheel      1,   0 2011-11-04 15:17:35 /dev/tty
    77953 drwxr-xr-x    3 root     wheel       22016 2011-10-17 21:15:55 /dev
        2 drwxr-xr-x   21 root     wheel        1024 2010-08-23 11:43:46 /
    79285 crw-rw-rw-    1 root     wheel     22,   0 2008-10-25 08:03:50 /dev/stdin
    77953 drwxr-xr-x    3 root     wheel       22016 2011-10-17 21:15:55 /dev
        2 drwxr-xr-x   21 root     wheel        1024 2010-08-23 11:43:46 /
    79308 crw-rw-rw-    1 root     wheel     22,   0 2008-10-25 08:03:51 /dev/fd/0
    77954 dr-xr-xr-x    2 root     wheel        1024 2008-10-25 08:03:51 /dev/fd
    77953 drwxr-xr-x    3 root     wheel       22016 2011-10-17 21:15:55 /dev
        2 drwxr-xr-x   21 root     wheel        1024 2010-08-23 11:43:46 /
  1143296 drwxr-xr-x  197 tchrist  wheel       48128 2011-11-07 04:16:49 .
        2 drwxr-xr-x   15 root     wheel         512 2008-08-12 16:51:23 /home
        2 drwxr-xr-x   21 root     wheel        1024 2010-08-23 11:43:46 /
  1146538 lrwx------    1 root     wheel           5 2008-10-23 14:50:24 Mail -> /mail
        2 drwxr-xr-x  134 tchrist  wheel        5120 2011-11-07 07:43:59 /mail
        2 drwxr-xr-x   21 root     wheel        1024 2010-08-23 11:43:46 /
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks! it works. –  xyz Nov 7 '11 at 11:06
    
Why is it called pup? By analogy to dd? –  larsmans Nov 7 '11 at 11:14
    
That's ironic. The first instinct a person has on seeing this is to post a link to grymoire.com/Unix/CshTop10.txt (is there a more canonical link?). I admit some surprise that this was posted by tchrist! –  William Pursell Nov 7 '11 at 11:19
    
@WilliamPursell: Like tell me about it already. :( It was written in 1983 before I had taken up the holy war against csh. I see at least one bug in it, in that it doesn’t quote the backtick assignment. I think there are probably better links, but I don’t know about canon. Try this one. –  tchrist Nov 7 '11 at 11:23
1  
@larsmans I called it pup because it prints everything up. No, it doesn't make a lot of sense but it is easy to type. –  tchrist Nov 7 '11 at 14:59

You can run this code :

lsd() { local v="$1"; while :; do v="${v%/*}"; [[ "$v" && ! -f "$v" ]] || break; ls -ld "$v"; done; }


lsd /usr/share/doc/acl/README
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 14 mai   12:28 /usr/share/doc/acl/
drwxr-xr-x 145 root root 4096  4 nov.  06:23 /usr/share/doc/
drwxr-xr-x 263 root root 12288  4 nov.  06:23 /usr/share/
drwxr-xr-x 14 root root 4096 28 oct.  22:47 /usr/

Edit: added local keyword

Edit2: The last item error is resolved

share|improve this answer
    
I don't like the camelCase name one bit, and I don't like the way it resets a global variable, but +1 for the oneliner sh magic. –  larsmans Nov 7 '11 at 11:09
    
@larsmans Indeed, the command violates the v7 rules of shell command names, in which they are all lowercase and very short to type, at 8 or fewer characters. The only exception I can quickly think of is MAKEDEV. –  tchrist Nov 7 '11 at 11:11
    
You can put the name you want, it's not predifined or such ;) For the global, you can add local to the loop... –  sputnick Nov 7 '11 at 11:13
    
-1 the last iteration always throws the error: ls: : No such file or directory, because v is empty. You also have to make sure you add a / to the last directory or it will be missed. e.g. getPermForDirs /var/tmp prints drwxr-xr-x 40 root root 4096 Nov 6 05:09 /var/ ls: : No such file or directory –  dogbane Nov 7 '11 at 11:14
    
There's a new version ;) –  sputnick Nov 7 '11 at 11:20

Here is a simple while-loop which does the job:

f="$PWD"
while [ "$f" != "/" ]
do
    ls -ld "$f"
    f=$(dirname "$f")
done
share|improve this answer
    
There’s some weird thing on Linux where you can find yourself at a root of "//". Don’t remember how that works, though. –  tchrist Nov 7 '11 at 11:09
    
@tchrist: AFAIK no one uses it on any current Unix, so it's just treated the same as /. In this case I think listing / twice or listing // once would both be acceptable. That said, any use of // for / is probably not future proof. –  Sorpigal Nov 7 '11 at 13:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.