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I have transparent images [shown below] and I am trying to overlay it with aishack.in cvOverlayImage() function to overlay it on camera source

cvOverlayImage()

    void cvOverlayImage(IplImage* src, IplImage* overlay, CvPoint location, CvScalar S, CvScalar D)
    {
     int x,y,i;

      for(x=0;x < overlay->width -10;x++)
        {
            if(x+location.x>=src->width) continue;
            for(y=0;y < overlay->height -10;y++)
            {
                if(y+location.y>=src->height) continue;
                CvScalar source = cvGet2D(src, y+location.y, x+location.x);
                CvScalar over = cvGet2D(overlay, y, x);
                CvScalar merged;
                for(i=0;i<4;i++)
                merged.val[i] = (S.val[i]*source.val[i]+D.val[i]*over.val[i]);
                cvSet2D(src, y+location.y, x+location.x, merged);
            }
        }
    }

calling cvOverlayImage()

cvOverlayImage(image_n, neg_img, cvPoint(0, 0), cvScalar(1.0,1.0,1.0,1.0), cvScalar(0.1,0.1,0.1,0.1));

Inputs to cvOverlayImage()

  1. Camera Capture

Camera Capture

  1. Negative Image

Negative Image

Output from cvOverlayImage()

Output

As you can see I am not getting what I need.Please help me.

share|improve this question
1  
If your problem is because of the rectangle that ruins your image, than you should only overlay the pixels that are not white(if background white), otherwise you should make a mask of the image(maybe a Threshold above the background) and then overlay those pixels completely, replacing the ones under them. That should give a nicer result :) – Adrian Popovici Nov 8 '11 at 6:47
    
you are right, but the glasses will still appear transparent :) – Smash Nov 8 '11 at 15:58
    
@Smash I didnt got what you commented...Have you tried what Adrian Popovici suggested...Please help with the code if you got through it... – Wazzzy Nov 8 '11 at 16:31
    
@WasimKarani Where you able to really solve this? – karlphillip Aug 22 '12 at 18:07
    
@karlphillip No I didn't, else I would have posted my answer – Wazzzy Aug 23 '12 at 4:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This isn't tested, but shouldn't S[i]+D[i] = 1 to preserve the total intensity ?

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for answering.I tried that but didnt worked. – Wazzzy Nov 8 '11 at 5:09

One solution I used is to simply detect where the white is present and in those cases simply use the pixel from the source picture. Otherwise use the overlay picture's pixel. Worked well for me for a similar situation. Also, if the picture you load has the alpha channel and can be used as a mask, that's even better.

void cvOverlayImage(IplImage* src, IplImage* overlay, CvPoint location, 
CvScalar S, CvScalar D)
{
 int x,y,i;

  for(x=0;x < overlay->width;x++)
    {
        if(x+location.x>=src->width) continue;
        for(y=0;y < overlay->height;y++)
        {
            if(y+location.y>=src->height) continue;
            CvScalar source = cvGet2D(src, y+location.y, x+location.x);
            CvScalar over = cvGet2D(overlay, y, x);
            CvScalar merged;
            if(over.val[0] == 255 && over.val[1] == 255 && over.val[2] == 255 && over.val[3] == 255)
            {
                // White pixel so don't overlay
                for(i=0;i<4;i++)
                    merged.val[i] = (source.val[i]);
            }
            else
            {
                for(i=0;i<4;i++)
                    merged.val[i] = (over.val[i]);

            }

            cvSet2D(src, y+location.y, x+location.x, merged);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1...good thought...But if I would have got some code to do that, it will be more cool.... – Wazzzy Oct 4 '12 at 4:23

I think what you want to achieve is not addition but multiplication:

int multiplicator = over.val[i] / 255 // 0 for black, 1 for white
merged.val[i] = source.val[i] * multiplicator;

This way the pixel value will be the original value for a white overlay pixel and black for a black overlay pixel.

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