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I've been asked to create a financial report, which needs to give a total commission rate between two dates for several 'referrers'. That's the easy part.

The difficult part is that the commission rate varies depending not only on the referrer but also on the type of referral and also on the number of referrals of that type that have been made by a given referrer.

The tracking of the number of referrals needs to take into account ALL referrals, rather than those in the given date range - in other words, the commission rate is on a sliding scale for each referrer, changing as their total referrals increase. Luckily, there are only a maximum of 3 commission levels for each type of referral.

The referrals are all stored in the same table, 1 row per referral, with a field denoting the referrer and the type of referral. An example to illustrate:

ID   Type    Referrer    Date
1    A       X           01/12/08
2    A       X           15/01/09
3    A       X           23/02/09
4    B       X           01/12/08
5    B       X           15/01/09
6    A       Y           01/12/08
7    A       Y           15/01/09
8    B       Y           15/01/09
9    B       Y           23/02/09

The commission rates are not stored in the referral table - and indeed may change - instead they are stored in the referrer table, like so:

Referrer    Comm_A1    Comm_A2    Comm_A3    Comm_B1    Comm_B2    Comm_B3
X           30         20         10         55         45         35
Y           45         35         25         60         40         30

Looking at the above referral table as an example, and assuming the commission rate level increased after referral number 1 and 2 (then remained the same), running a commission report for December 2008 to February 2009 would return the following:

[Edit] - to clarify the above, the commission rate has three levels for each type and each referrer, with the initial rate Comm_A1 for the first referral commission, then Comm_A2 for the second, and Comm_A3 for all subsequent referrals.

Referrer    Type_A_Comm    Type_A_Ref    Type_B_Comm    Type_B_Ref
X           60             3             100            2
Y           80             2             100            2

Running a commission report for just February 2009 would return:

Referrer    Type_A_Comm    Type_A_Ref    Type_B_Comm    Type_B_Ref
X           10             1             0              0
Y           0              0             40             1

Edit the above results have been adjusted from my original question, in terms of the column / row grouping.

I'm quite sure that any solution will involve a sub-query (perhaps for each referral type) and also some kind of aggregate / Sum If - but I'm struggling to come up with a working query.

[Edit] I'm not sure about writing an equation of my requirements, but I'll try to list the steps as I see them:

Determine the number of previous referrals for each type and each referrer - that is, irrespective of any date range.

Based on the number of previous referrals, select the appropriate commission level - 0 previous = level 1, 1 previous = level 2, 2 or more previous = level 3

(Note: a referrer with no previous referrals but, say, 3 new referrals, would expect a commission of 1 x level 1, 1 x level 2, 1 x level 3 = total commission)

Filter results according to a date range - so that commission payable for a period of activity may be determined.

Return data with column for referrer, and a column with the total commission for each referral type (and ideally, also a column with a count for each referral type).

Does that help to clarify my requirements?

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3  
"assuming the commission rate level increased at referral number 1 and 2" -- wouldn't you need some data in your database to determine WHEN the rate increases? With the data you've presented now, I think this cannot be solved. –  Arjan Apr 29 '09 at 18:24
    
That's a very valid point. I was thinking the syntax would be something along the lines of "CASE referral_type_a_count WHEN 0 THEN Comm_A1 WHEN 1 THEN Comm_A2 ELSE Comm_A3 END AS comm_a_rate" - where "referral_type_a_count" was the result of sub-query (the referral types are finite, currently only two - A or B). –  BrynJ Apr 29 '09 at 18:39
    
I doubt I understand correctly, but it seems you're stating that when there's NO referrals, there is still a commission amount of Comm_A1? And 2 referrals or more yield Comm_A3? So this is supposed to be hardcoded for all referrers? Please update the question then. :-) –  Arjan Apr 29 '09 at 18:50
    
Your assumption is correct, in the case of no referrals then the selected rate would be Comm_A1 - but as per Adam Robinson reply, this value would be multiplied by zero, so the outcome is the same - zero commission. I'm not sure if my statement, makes sense - sorry :-) –  BrynJ Apr 29 '09 at 19:08
    
I would find it useful if you could show the equation, even if it is in multiple parts, as that would take out ambiguity and help us help you. :) –  James Black Apr 29 '09 at 19:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming that you have a table called type that lists your particular referral types, this should work (if not, you could substitute another subselect for getting the distinct types from referral for this purpose).

select
    r.referrer,
    t.type,
    (case 
    	when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) < @max1 then 
    		(case 
    			when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) < @max1 then isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) 
    			else @max1 - isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) 
    		end) 
    	else 0 
    end) * (case t.type when 'A' then r.Comm_A1 when 'B' then r.Comm_B1 else null end) +
    (case when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) > @max1 then
    	(case 
    		when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) < @max2 then 
    			(case 
    				when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) < @max2 then isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) 
    				else @max2 - isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) 
    			end) 
    		else 0 
    	end) -
    	(case 
    		when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) < @max1 then 
    			(case 
    				when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) < @max1 then isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) 
    				else @max1 - isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) 
    			end) 
    		else 0 
    	end)
    else 0 end) * (case t.type when 'A' then r.Comm_A2 when 'B' then r.Comm_B2 else null end) +
    (case when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) > @max2 then
    	(isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0)) -
    		(
    			(case when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) > @max1 then
    				(case 
    					when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) < @max2 then 
    						(case 
    							when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) < @max2 then isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) 
    							else @max2 - isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) 
    						end) 
    					else 0 
    				end) -
    				(case 
    					when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) < @max1 then 
    						(case 
    							when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) < @max1 then isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) 
    							else @max1 - isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) 
    						end) 
    					else 0 
    				end)
    			else 0 end) +
    			(case 
    				when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) < @max1 then 
    					(case 
    						when isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) + isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) < @max1 then isnull(ref_period.referrals, 0) 
    						else @max1 - isnull(ref_prior.referrals, 0) 
    					end) 
    				else 0 
    			end)
    		)   				
    else 0 end) * (case t.type when 'A' then r.Comm_A3 when 'B' then r.Comm_B3 else null end) as Total_Commission

from referrer r

join type t on 1 = 1 --intentional cartesian product
left join (select referrer, type, count(1) as referrals from referral where date < @start_date group by referrer, type) ref_prior on ref_prior.referrer = r.referrer and ref_prior.type = t.type
left join (select referrer, type, count(1) as referrals from referral where date between @start_date and @end_date group by referrer, type) ref_period on ref_period.referrer = r.referrer and ref_period.type = t.type

This assumes that you have a @start_date and @end_date variable, and you'll obviously have to supply the logic missing from the case statement to make the proper selection of rates based upon the type and number of referrals from ref_total.

Edit

After reviewing the question, I saw the comment about the sliding scale. This greatly increased the complexity of the query, but it's still doable. The revised query now also depends on the presence of two variables @max1 and @max2, representing the maximum number of sales that can fall into category '1' and category '2' (for testing purposes, I used 1 and 2 respectively, and these produced the expected results).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer Adam - I'm going to try to create the actual query now, and I'll report on progress. –  BrynJ Apr 29 '09 at 19:15
    
See the edit for more specific logic –  Adam Robinson Apr 29 '09 at 19:28
    
I've managed to get your query to run after some minor syntax changes (IFNULL in MySQL, instead of ISNULL) - I'm testing the data at the moment. One thing, which is absolutely my fault, I realise now that displaying the as 'Referrer, Type_A_Commission, Type_B_Commission' would be far tidier, and I've updated my question as such. My apologies for that. –  BrynJ Apr 29 '09 at 20:48
    
@Bryn, you're on your own with that one! Seriously, though, the logic in this is complicated enough. You'll end up with some serious code duplication and even more of a maintenance nightmare (I fully admit that the query above is--to put it mildly--dense) than it already is. If you want it that way, I would recommend using a pivot table in your reporting tool rather than doing all of that in the SQL. As for adding the counts, that's trivial. Just use ref_period.referrals. –  Adam Robinson Apr 29 '09 at 22:19
    
@Adam, I'll certainly consider taking a different approach on this one. BUT, your query appears to work great, returning the expected data - and I realised after I'd posted how easy it would be to add the number of referrals, and restructure the query to return the data in 1 row for each referrer. It was a long day yesterday! Many thanks for your answer, because I'm certain I'd have not had the solution without it :-) –  BrynJ Apr 30 '09 at 6:35

Adam's answer is far more thorough than I'm going to be but I think trying to write this as a single query might not be the right approach.

Have you thought about creating a stored procedure which creates and then populates a temporary table, step by step.

The temporary table would have the shape of the results set you're looking for. The initial insert creates your basic data set (essentially the number of rows you're looking to return with key identifiers and then anything else you're looking to return which can be easily assembled as part of the same query).

You then have a series of updates to the temporary table assembling each section of the more complex data.

Finally select it all back and drop the temporary table.

The advantages of this are that it allows you to break it down in your mind and assemble it a bit at a time which allows you to more easily find where you've gone wrong. It also means that the more complex bits can be assembled in a couple of stages.

In addition if some poor sod comes along and has to debug the whole thing afterwards it's going to be far easier for him to trace through what's happening where.

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EDIT: this answer does not take the following requirement into account, but there seems to be a bunch of new explanations so I guess I'll leave it here as is...

The tracking of the number of referrals needs to take into account ALL referrals, rather than those in the given date range

Ok, assuming the report period is monthly, and using a CASE where actually an IF could distinguish the two valid rates (for count = 1 and count > 1) as well, what about:

select
  ref.month, 
  ref.referrer, 
  ref.type,
  ( ref.count * 
      case ref.type
        when 'A' then
          case ref.count
            -- not useful: when 0 then com.Comm_A1
            when 1 then com.Comm_A2
            else com.Comm_A3
          end case
        when 'B' then
          case ref.count
            -- not useful: when 0 then com.Comm_B1
            when 1 then com.Comm_B2
            else com.Comm_B3
          end case
      end case 
  ) as total_commission
from
  ( select
      date_format(date, '%Y-%m') as month,
      referrer,
      type,
      count(*) as count
    from referrals
    group by month, referrer, type
  ) as ref,
join commissions com on com.referrer = ref.referrer

(I guess the names such as 'ref' and 'count' are not too well chosen above.)

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your help regardless, Arjan. Sorry I could not be more clear from my original question - I did think the following sentence sufficient: "The tracking of the number of referrals needs to take into account ALL referrals, rather than those in the given date range" :-) –  BrynJ Apr 29 '09 at 21:23
    
Sure, I certainly missed that part and then "in the case of no referrals then the selected rate would be Comm_A1 - but as per Adam Robinson reply, this value would be multiplied by zero, so the outcome is the same - zero commission" somehow made that worse. :-) And things like "(Note: a referrer with no previous referrals but, say, 3 new referrals, would expect a commission of 1 x level 1, 1 x level 2, 1 x level 3 = total commission)" seem new, right...? ;-) I've not looked at Adam's answer, but assume it works; if not then let us know. –  Arjan Apr 29 '09 at 21:52
    
@Arjan: Maybe Bryn and I just have the same mental dysfunction ;) That was the condition that I had realized when I did the edit of my procedure above, and that's why it's so freaking complicated now! –  Adam Robinson Apr 29 '09 at 22:16
    
@All: I agree, my explanations could have been clearer - I think my clarifications, if anything, confused matters. –  BrynJ Apr 30 '09 at 6:38

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