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How to initialize an inner structure inside the outer structure?

struct TOuter
{
   struct TInner
   {
       bool b1, b2;
       TInner () : b1 (false), b2(false) {}
   };

   bool b3;

   TOuter (): TOuter::TInner(), b3(true) {} // Error
};
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Retagged C++, hoping it really is c++... –  jpalecek Nov 7 '11 at 12:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In this case, you have no object of the TInner struct, so there's no need to initialize anything.

Other than that, it's just the same as with any other class/struct type:

struct TOuter
{
   struct TInner
   {
       bool b1, b2;
       TInner () : b1 (false), b2(false) {}
   };

   bool b3;

   TInner foo;

   TOuter (): foo(), b3(true) { // member variable
     TInner x; // local variable
   }
};

TOuter::TInner out; // need qualified name, bc. TInner is not in scope
...
bar(TOuter::TInner()); // temporary
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Removed the unnecessary passage from this answer (as it's already present in the question). –  iammilind Nov 7 '11 at 12:20

You should create an instance of TInner inside TOuter.

struct TOuter
{
   struct TInner
   {
       bool b1, b2;
       TInner () : b1 (false), b2(false) {}
   };

   TInner inner;
   bool b3;

   TOuter (): inner(), b3(true) {}
};

You can also do it by writing the variable name right after the struct like this:

    struct TInner
    {
        bool b1, b2;
        TInner () : b1 (false), b2(false) {}
    } inner;
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