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I am a bit confused about something

Let me start with this

vector<Type> vect; //allocates vect on stack and each of the Type (using std::allocator) also will be on the stack

vector<Type> *vect = new vector<Type>; //allocates vect on heap and each of the Type will be allocated on stack

vector<Type*> vect; //vect will be on stack and Type* will be on heap. 

What I would like to know is, are all of the above statements true?

How is the memory allocated for Type internally in a vector or any other STL container for that matter?

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up vote 85 down vote accepted
vector<Type> vect;

will allocate the vector, i.e. the header info, on the stack, but the elements on the free store ("heap").

vector<Type> *vect = new vector<Type>;

allocates everything on the free store.

vector<Type*> vect;

will allocate the vector on the stack and a bunch of pointers on the free store, but where these point is determined by how you use them (you could point element 0 to the free store and element 1 to the stack, say).

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1  
But I am having a scenario, where I am getting a segmentation fault when Type is growing big on the second declaration. I was assuming that it was because Type was being allocated on the stack. – Phelodas Nov 7 '11 at 12:35
    
The same works properly when I am using the third declaration and allocates Type explicitly on the heap. Any thoughts on this? – Phelodas Nov 7 '11 at 12:37
    
@Phelodas: without seeing your code, this is impossible to assess. Please open a new question. – larsmans Nov 7 '11 at 12:48
    
Alright thanks larsman. Will try and do that – Phelodas Nov 7 '11 at 13:01
1  
@flyrain: vectors clean up after themselves. Read up on RAII. – larsmans Sep 25 '13 at 12:08

Assuming an implementation which actually has a stack and a heap (standard C++ makes no requirement to have such things) the only true statement is the last one.

vector<Type> vect;
//allocates vect on stack and each of the Type (using std::allocator) also will be on the stack

This is true, except for the last part (Type won't be on the stack). Imagine:

  void foo(vector<Type>& vec) {
     // Can't be on stack - how would the stack "expand"
     // to make the extra space required between main and foo?
     vec.push_back(Type());
  }

  int main() {
    vector<Type> bar;
    foo(bar);
  }

Likewise:

 vector<Type> *vect = new vector<Type>; //allocates vect on heap and each of the Type will be allocated on stack

True except the last part, with a similar counter example:

  void foo(vector<Type> *vec) {
     // Can't be on stack - how would the stack "expand"
     // to make the extra space required between main and foo?
     vec->push_back(Type());
  }

  int main() {
    vector<Type> *bar = new vector<Type>;
    foo(bar);
  }

For:

vector<Type*> vect; //vect will be on stack and Type* will be on heap. 

this is true, but note here that the Type* pointers will be on the heap, but the Type instances they point to need not be:

  int main() {
    vector<Type*> bar;
    Type foo;
    bar.push_back(&foo);
  }
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in what sort of context would you not have a stack? I understand you're saying the standard doesn't require it, but practically speaking, when would you be without a stack? – Nerdtron Nov 7 '11 at 14:59
2  
@Nerdtron - IIRC on some small microcontrollers you have a call stack that can store nothing other than the PC (program counter) at the point of the last call, ready for a RET. Your compiler might therefore choose to place "automatic storage" (for non-recursive functions) in a fixed location with little/no relation to the flow of execution. It could quite sensibly flatten the whole program out. Even for the recursive case you could have a "stack per function" policy or a separate stack for automatic variables and return addresses, which makes the phrase "the stack" somewhat meaningless. – Flexo Nov 7 '11 at 15:36
    
You could use heap based allocation for everything and have a "cleanup stack" that manages automatic storage (and possibly delete too). – Flexo Nov 7 '11 at 15:38
vector<Type> vect; //allocates vect on stack and each of the Type (using std::allocator) also will be on the stack

No, vect will be on the stack, but the array it uses internally to store the items will be on the heap. The items will reside in that array.

vector<Type> *vect = new vector<Type>; //allocates vect on heap and each of the Type will be allocated on stack

No. Same as above, just the vector class will be on the heap.

vector<Type*> vect; //vect will be on stack and Type* will be on heap. 

vect will be on the stack, its items (pointers to Type) will be on the heap, and you can't tell where will be the Types the pointers point to. Could be on stack, could be on the heap, could be in the global data, could be nowhere (ie. NULL pointers).

BTW the implementation could in fact store some vectors (typically of small size) on the stack entirely. Not that I know of any such implementation, but it can.

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You should have made this a comment instead of an answer. – the_drow Nov 7 '11 at 12:38
1  
@the_drow: care to tell why? It doesn't look like a comment to me. – jpalecek Nov 7 '11 at 12:50
    
It does not now :) – the_drow Nov 7 '11 at 16:35

Only this statement is true:

vector <Type*> vect; //vect will be on stack and Type* will be on heap.

Type* pointers are allocated on heap, because amount of the pointers can change dynamically.

vect in this case is allocated on stack, because you defined it as a local stack variable.

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