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This is just a question out of curiosity but I am looking at a database and pulling data from a table with a query on one of the columns. The column has four possible values null, 0, 1, 2. When I run the query as:

SELECT * FROM STATUS WHERE STATE != '1' AND STATE != '2';

I get the same results as running:

SELECT * FROM STATUS WHERE STATE = '0';

I.e. rows with a null value in the top command in the queried column seem to be omitted from the results, does this always happen in SQL?

I'm running my commands through Oracle SQL Developer.

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"does this always happen in SQL?" -- short answer: no. SQL exhibits three-valued logic (3VL). I say "exhibits" very deliberately because the specs for SQL's 3VL are inconsistent and incomplete. You simply have to learn all the edge cases. The best approach IMO is to avoid nulls in SQL. –  onedaywhen Nov 7 '11 at 15:25
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I know this adds no insight, but should the OR be an AND? –  Pumbaa80 Jul 22 at 8:58
    
From what I can remember when I was doing this having it as OR is correct i.e. I only wanted STATE 0 rows but I was also getting NULL rows. I wasn't aware of the three-valued logic as @Vash describes in his answer. I should have used STATE NOT IN('1','2') as Michael Durrant pointed out. My SQL's a lot better then it was back then lol. –  Alexei Blue Jul 22 at 13:58
    
I feel a bit stupid just remembering this but it just occurred to me that @Pumbaa80 is right, I did mean AND, OR wouldn't make any sense. STATE NOT IN(...) is also correct. –  Alexei Blue Jul 23 at 12:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In several languages NULL is handled differently: Most people know about two-valued logic where true and false are the only comparable values in boolean expressions (even is false is defined as 0 and true as anything else).

In Standard SQL you have to think about three-valued logic. NULL is not treated as a real value, you could rather call it "unknown". So if the value is unknown it is not clear if in your case state is 0, 1, or anything else. So NULL != 1 results to NULL again.

This concludes that whereever you filter something that may be NULL, you have to treat NULL values by yourself. Note that the syntax is different as well: NULL values can only be compare with x IS NULL instead of x = NULL. See Wikipedia for a truth table showing the results of logic operations.

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I see, cheers for the quick answer Vash :) I will definitely keep that in mind in the future. –  Alexei Blue Nov 7 '11 at 15:08
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I think at stackexchange you will receive answers very fast in general. If you try answering questions yourself you will find out that it is hard to find an unanswered question that you are able to answer and you want to answer. However this was a short answer as well, and now that I am at home I will update it too, to reflect three-valued logic. –  Vash Nov 7 '11 at 17:32

multiple or's with where's can quickly become hard to read and uncertain as to results.

I would recommend extra parenthesis plus the use of the IN statement (NOT IN in this case), e.g.

SELECT * FROM STATUS WHERE (STATE NOT IN ('1', '2')) or STATE is null;

Implmentations can vary between database vendor but the above explicit syntax should make sure of the results.

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Yest it's normal, you can maybe put a database settings to fixed that

But you could modify your code and do something like that :

SELECT * FROM STATUS WHERE STATE != '1' OR STATE != '2' or STATE is null;

Look at this for more info : http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_null_values.asp

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