Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry for such a random title, but have no idea how to explain it better. And therefore, no idea if this is a duplicate question or not.

So, when declaring a new object, I'm looking to calculate the giga value:

var myObject = {
    super : 1,
    mega : 5,
    uber : 100,
    giga : this.super + this.mega + this.uber // super + mega + uber doesn't cut it either..
};

But this doesn't work, so, any ways of doing this while declaring, or not possible?

Hope I've made myself clear and thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of Self-references in object literal declarations –  Felix Kling Nov 7 '11 at 13:07
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In Javascript 1.5 you can use the get keyword to define a getter

var obj = {
    super : 1,
    mega : 5,
    uber : 100,
    get giga() {
        return this.super + this.mega + this.uber;
    }
};

alert(obj.giga) // 106

more on this http://robertnyman.com/2009/05/28/getters-and-setters-with-javascript-code-samples-and-demos/

share|improve this answer
    
That will completely fall over on non-ES5 browsers. Please use Object.defineProperty to define getter/setters –  Raynos Nov 7 '11 at 13:14
    
There is no specification whether I'm interested in ES5 or ES4 or ESx, I see no reason for the downvote. In fact, this is the cleanest answer so far. –  jolt Nov 7 '11 at 13:44
    
@Tom: But it will not work in IE8 for example. –  Felix Kling Nov 7 '11 at 13:52
    
I've never mentioned that I need IE8 support.. –  jolt Nov 7 '11 at 17:13
add comment

I assume you have a really good reason for the need to do this inline, otherwise such trickery is not really a good idea.

Here is what I came up with:

var myObject = (function(){
    this.giga = this.super + this.mega + this.uber;
    return this;
}).call({
    super : 1,
    mega : 5,
    uber : 100
});
share|improve this answer
add comment
var myObject = {
    super : 1,
    mega : 5,
    uber : 100
};
myObject.giga = myObject.super + myObject.mega + myObject.uber;
share|improve this answer
    
There is a trailing comma, I had it as well when copypasting :P –  Esailija Nov 7 '11 at 13:16
    
@Esailija why I copy paste fail? –  Raynos Nov 7 '11 at 13:22
    
I don't understand the question. I meant I had the same error as you because I copypasted the OP's message, so I thought you had done so as well. –  Esailija Nov 7 '11 at 13:27
    
@Esailija it was a joke... –  Raynos Nov 7 '11 at 13:31
    
lols, makes sense now :) –  Esailija Nov 7 '11 at 13:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.