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i created a linked list : struct Node and List Class and i used it outside with my main method,

#include "Lists.cpp"
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

int main(){


    Lists l = new Lists(1);

    l.add(2);
    l.add(3);
    l.add(4);
    l.add(5);



    system("pause");
    return 0;
        }

but it produces an error that says "invalid conversion from List* to int". Is my using of outside class right? Im a little confused how I will solve this.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Node{
       int data;
       Node *next;       
       Node(int i){
                data = i;
                next = NULL;
                }

       };

class List{
      Node *head;



      public:
      List(int i){
               head = new Node(i);
      }

      void addToHead(int i){
          Node *temp = new Node(i);
          temp->next = head;
          head = temp;
           }

      void add(int i){
                Node *currNode = head;
                while(currNode!= NULL){
                        if(currNode->next == NULL){
                          currNode->next = new Node(i);
                          break;         
                                }
                         else{
                          currNode = currNode-> next;      
                              }   
                                 }

                }
      void deleteNode(int i){
           Node *currNode = head;
           Node *prevNode = NULL;

           while(currNode!=  NULL){
                             if(currNode->data == i) {
                             if(prevNode== NULL){
                                           head = head->next;
                                           }                  
                              else{
                                   prevNode->next = currNode->next;
                                   }                                
                              }
                              prevNode = currNode;
                              currNode =  currNode -> next;                            
                             }
           }
      void insert(int position, Node *n){
           Node *currNode= head;
           Node *prevNode = NULL;

           for(int counter = 0; counter>= position && currNode!= NULL; counter++){
                   if(counter==position){
                              Node *temp = currNode;
                              n->next  =  currNode;
                              prevNode->next= n;                              
                              }                  
                   prevNode = currNode;
                   currNode = currNode-> next;
                   }
           }
      void traverse(Node *node){
           if(node!=NULL){
           cout<<  node-> data  <<endl;
           traverse(node->next);
                          }
           }

      };
share|improve this question
    
Usually it is a bad idea to include *.cpp file. – eugene_che Nov 7 '11 at 13:04
2  
Or to put it another way, if you're going to include a file it's usually a bad idea to call it .cpp. – Steve Jessop Nov 7 '11 at 13:06
    
then ill just include it as include "Lists"? – jko Nov 7 '11 at 13:12
1  
@jko: lists.hpp usually – Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 7 '11 at 13:21
    
Seriously, this kind of exercise is not a good way to learn how to work with pointers. Use the standard library containers. – Karl Knechtel Nov 7 '11 at 13:54
up vote 5 down vote accepted
Lists l = new Lists(1);

should be:

Lists *l = new Lists(1);

new provides a pointer.

The reason you get that specific error is that the line would be valid if the conversion chain Lists * -> int -> Lists were valid. The second is valid here because of the constructor but the first is not.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it solved the problem. But why do i have to declare it as a pointer? – jko Nov 7 '11 at 13:07
2  
@jko, because new provides a pointer. – Matthew Flaschen Nov 7 '11 at 13:08
    
@jko: That's just how dynamic allocation works. You don't get an object in the current scope: it's floating elsewhere in dynamic memory. The best you can do is have a pointer to it. – Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 7 '11 at 13:21
    
why is it when i tried insertng like, insert(2,new Node(100)); and traverse in it.. i dont get correct result; – jko Nov 7 '11 at 16:03
1  
@jko, you should probably ask a new question for that. – Matthew Flaschen Nov 8 '11 at 1:11

At which line do you get the mentionned error ? At first glance, Lists l = new Lists(1); is already wrong : Lists* l = new Lists(1); would be correct.

But this error does not correspond to the one you mention. Also note that you're defining List and trying to use Lists.

Is this the code you're trying to compile ?

share|improve this answer

Use List *l = new List(1); or std::shared_ptr<List> l = make_shared<List>( 1 ); if you want a dynamically-allocated List.

Or List l(1); if you want a List with automatic storage duration.

Be careful with the names, in the class definition you use List, and in the main function you use Lists.

share|improve this answer

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