Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have 2 classes, one being the parent with the following:

public class Parent {
    ...
    public void method1() {
        method2();
    }

    public void method2() {
    }
}

And then in the subclass

public class Child extends Parent {
    ...
    public void method2() {
        ...
    }
}

If I run the following code:

Child c = new Child();
c.method1();

Which version of method2 gets called?

share|improve this question
3  
Why don't you run the code through a debugger and include some println statements? –  mre Nov 7 '11 at 13:57
1  
Why don't you just quickly implement this in a test program and find out? –  Tudor Nov 7 '11 at 13:58
    
Write a learning test and find out: users.csc.calpoly.edu/~djanzen/tdl/learningtest –  Roy Truelove Nov 7 '11 at 14:02
1  
Testing it would provide the answer, but not the reason. And that's probably what the asker wants to know, even though he didn't explicitly ask it. It'd be better to suggest reading up on Java tutorials or even specs, but finding the best resources or making sense of them isn't always as straightfoward for someone new to Java or programming. Sometimes we gotta read between the lines. –  G_H Nov 7 '11 at 14:11
2  
(Nothing to do with the question being asked, but it's generally a good idea to use @Override on overrides, and where reasonable avoiding overriding non-abstract methods.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 7 '11 at 14:23
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

All methods are virtual in Java, which means that it is the Child.method2 that will be called (even if the call is done from the context of Parent).

If the correctness of Parent.method1 relies on the implementation of method2, you should design it differently:

public class Parent {
    ...
    public void method1() {
        method2impl();
    }

    public void method2() {
        method2impl();
    }

    // make it private or final.
    public final method2impl() {
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
As soon as I wrote the comment I saw your update. Now I have deleted my comment and this series of comments is just going to confuse everyone else ;) –  DaveJohnston Nov 7 '11 at 14:04
add comment

Child#method2 will be called, as it overrides that of the parent.

share|improve this answer
    
Out of interest, is the notation Class#method some convention for making clear it's an instance method and not a static one? Because that'd be useful for future use if so. –  G_H Nov 7 '11 at 14:43
    
I don't know how prominent the notation is, but at least that is the way I was thought it :) I know it is a standard in ruby at least. –  jornb87 Nov 7 '11 at 14:50
    
I've seen it being used here before. It's not a bad convention, think I'll start using it as well. –  G_H Nov 7 '11 at 15:25
add comment

Once you've created an object of type Child, that's its runtime type. This won't change, regardless of casts or whatever you do to it. When you call a method, the implementation of that runtime type is going to be executed. If that type doesn't have an implementation of its own, it'll delegate to the parent class.

Even though you call method1 which was defined in Parent, once that method calls method2 it'll resolve to the implementation of the runtime type of the object. If that's Child, then that's the class' method which will be called.

Mind that this dynamic behaviour is different than selecting a method based on parameter types, which is done statically. Take the following, with your class definitions...

public void methodTest(Parent p) {} //Let's call this "first method"
public void methodTest(Child c) {} //Let's call this "second method"

Parent p = new Parent();
Child c = new Child();

//Assume a is a variable of some type that implements the above methods
a.methodTest(p); //Will call first method
a.methodTest(c); //Will call second method
a.methodTest((Parent)c); //WILL CALL FIRST METHOD!

So selecting a method based on parameter types is done statically. It won't select a different method based on runtime type.

But selecting a method based on what object it's being called on depends on that object's runtime type. That's what allows us to override method behaviour in subclasses.

share|improve this answer
add comment
public class Parent {
    public void method1() {
        method2();
    }
    public void method2() {
        System.out.println("parent m 2");
    }
}
public class Child extends Parent {
    public void method2(){
        System.out.println("child m 2");
    }
}
public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Child c = new Child();
        c.method1();
        System.out.println("________________");
        c.method2();
    }
}

And the output will be:

child m 2
________________
child m 2
share|improve this answer
add comment

I have some more questions for you:

public interface CanDoMethod1 {
    public void method1();
}

public class Parent implements CanDoMethod1 {
    public void method1() {
        System.err.println("Parent doing method1");
    }
}

public class Child extends Parent {
    public void method1() {
        System.err.println("Child doing method1");
    }    
}

Now you run the following code:

CanDoMethod1 instance = new Parent();
instance.method1();

What is the output?

And when you run:

CanDoMethod1 instance = new Child();
instance.method1();

Then what is the output?

And when you run:

Parent instance = new Child();
instance.method1();

Then what is the output? Why is no cast needed here?

And when you run:

Child instance = (Child) new Parent();
instance.method1();

Does this compile? If so, then what is the output?

In summary, notice that the method called is always the method of the implementation class you created, no matter what you cast or assign it to.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.