Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a collection of lists with each containing around 6 to 7 values. Like,

list1 = 2,4,7,4,9,5
list2 = 4,3,7.3,9,8,1.2
list3 = 2,2.4,7,9,8,5
list4 = 9,1.6,4,3,4,1
list5 = 2,5,7,9,1,4
list6 = 6,8,7,2,1,5
list7 = 4,2,5,2,1,3

Now I want to sort these with index1 as primary and index3 as secondary and index2 as tertiary and so on. That is, the output should be like:

 2,2.4,7,9,8,5
 2,4,7,4,9,5
 2,5,7,9,1,4
 4,2,5,2,1,3
 6,8,7,2,1,5
 9,1.6,4,3,4,1

I want the list order to be sorted for index1 first and if the values are same for index1 than sorting is done on index3 and if further same than on index2. Here the number of lists are less which can increase to 20 and the indexes can grow up to 20 as well.

The algorithm I want to know is the same as that of iTunes song sorting, in which songs with the same album are sorted first and then by artist and then by rank and then by name. That's the album's if album names are the same then sorting is done on the artist if same, then by rank and so on. The code can be in C/C++/tcl/shell.

share|improve this question
    
Will it really be index3 before index 2? If yes, then the and so on in your explanation is not enough to explain the sorting predicate. –  Christian Rau Nov 7 '11 at 15:02
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
sort -n -t ',' -k 1 -k 3 -k 2

Feed the lists as individual lines into it.

share|improve this answer
    
Will that process the numbers as strings or integers, though? –  Rup Nov 7 '11 at 14:57
1  
@Rup: as floats, due to the -n. –  jpalecek Nov 7 '11 at 15:00
    
sort -n -t ',' -k 1 -k 3 -k 2 works fine. –  user954134 Nov 7 '11 at 20:29
    
Is there any possible solution on tcl side. :) –  user954134 Nov 7 '11 at 20:29
add comment

To do this in Tcl, assuming there's not huge amounts of data (a few MB wouldn't be “huge”) the easiest way would be:

# Read the values in from stdin, break into lists of lists
foreach line [split [read stdin] "\n"] {
    lappend records [split $line ","]
}

# Sort twice, first by secondary key then by primary (lsort is _stable_)
set records [lsort -index 1 -real $records]
set records [lsort -index 0 -real $records]

# Write the values back out to stdout
foreach record $records {
    puts [join $record ","]
}

If you're using anything more complex than simple numbers, consider using the csv package in Tcllib for parsing and formatting, as it will deal with many syntactic issues that crop up in Real Data. If you're dealing with a lot of data (where “lot” depends on how much memory you deploy with) then consider using a more stream-oriented method for handling the data (and there are a few other optimizations in the memory handling) and you might also want to use the -command option to lsort to supply a custom comparator so you can sort only once; the performance hit of a custom comparator is quite high, alas, but for many records the reduced number of comparisons will win out. Or shove the data into a database like SQLite or Postgres.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats what i did at first place but i need not to make new files and storing in data structure was not easy.. Thanks for your input. :) –  user954134 Nov 8 '11 at 14:05
    
@user954134: The more detail of what you are really looking for, the more likely you are to get something directly useful. In particular, stating the desired data sources and sinks and how much data is to be handled, these would all have helped hugely. (There's a big difference between sorting 1MB and 1TB!) –  Donal Fellows Nov 8 '11 at 14:15
add comment

You can use STL's sort, and then all you have to do is to write a comparison function that does what you want (the example in the link should be good enough).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Since you asked for a Tcl solution:

set lol {
   {2 4 7 4 9 5}
   {4 3 7.3 9 8 1.2}
   {2 2.4 7 9 8 5}
   {9 1.6 4 3 4 1}
   {2 5 7 9 1 4}
   {6 8 7 2 1 5}
   {4 2 5 2 1 3}
}

set ::EPS 10e-6
proc compareLists {ixo e1 e2} {
   foreach ix $ixo {
      set d [expr {[lindex $e1 $ix] - [lindex $e2 $ix]}]
      if {abs($d) > $::EPS} {
         return [expr {($d>0)-($d<0)}]
      }
   }
   return 0
}

foreach li [lsort -command [list compareLists {0 2 1}] $lol] {
   puts $li
}

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot.. :) –  user954134 Nov 8 '11 at 14:02
add comment

Here is a C++ solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

template <typename Array, typename CompareOrderIndex>
struct arrayCompare
{
   private:
      size_t
         size ;
      CompareOrderIndex
        index ;
   public:

      arrayCompare( CompareOrderIndex idx ) :  size( idx.size() ), index(idx)  { }

      bool helper( const Array &a1, const Array &a2, unsigned int num ) const
      {
         if( a1[ index[size-num] ] > a2[ index[size-num] ] )
         {
            return false ;
         }

         if( !(a1[ index[size-num] ] < a2[ index[size-num] ]) )
         {
            if( 1 != num )
            {
               return helper( a1, a2, num-1 ) ;   
            }
         }

         return true ;
      }

      bool operator()(  const Array &a1, const Array &a2 ) const
      {
         return helper( a1, a2, size ) ; 

      }
} ;

int main()
{
   std::vector< std::vector<float> > lists = {     { 2, 4,   7,   4, 9, 5},
                                                   { 4, 3,   7.3, 9, 8, 1.2 },
                                                   { 2, 2.4, 7,   9, 8, 5 },
                                                   { 4, 2,   5,   2, 1, 3 },
                                                   { 9, 1.6, 4,   3, 4, 1 },
                                                   { 2, 5,   7,   9, 1, 4 },
                                                   { 6, 8,   7,   2, 1, 5 },
                                                   { 4, 2,   5,   2, 1, 1 },
                                                };
   //
   // Specify the column indexes to compare and the order to compare.
   // In this case it will first compare column 1 then 3 and finally 2.
   // 
   //std::vector<int> indexOrder = { 0, 2, 1, 3, 4 ,5  } ;
   std::vector<int> indexOrder = { 0, 2, 1  } ;

   arrayCompare< std::vector<float>, std::vector<int>> compV( indexOrder ) ;

   std::sort( lists.begin(), lists.end(), arrayCompare< std::vector<float>, std::vector<int>>( indexOrder )  ) ;

    for(auto p: lists) 
    {
       for( unsigned int i = 0; i < p.size(); ++i )
       {
          unsigned int idx = ( i > (indexOrder.size() -1) ? i : indexOrder[i] ) ;

          std::cout << p[idx] << ", " ;
       }
       std::cout << std::endl ;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.