Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Java, a class can never be qualified to be either private or protected. It can simply be public all the times. It's quite obvious, there is no question about it.


Inner classes in Java however, can be designated with any of these modifiers private, protected or public. An inner class can also be defined within an individual block like a method. In such a case, an inner class can not be designated with any of these modifiers, private, public or protected.


The following simple program is compiled with no errors and works just fine.

package amazingjava;
final class Demo
{
    public class Really
    {
        public class Quite
        {
            public class Surprising
            {
                @Override
                public String toString()
                {
                    return( "it really works !" );
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

final public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println( "It may be hard to believe, but " + new Demo().new   
        Really().new Quite().new Surprising().toString());

        class Really
        {
            class Quite
            {
                class Surprising
                {
                    @Override
                    public String toString()
                    {
                        return( "it really works !" );
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.println( "It may be hard to believe, but " + new Really().new 
       Quite().new Surprising().toString());
    }
}

It produces the following output.

It may be hard to believe, but it really works !

It may be hard to believe, but it really works !


Now, my question is only that the inner classes declared inside the main() method in the above example can not have any modifiers. An attempt to qualify those classes with any of modifiers private, protected or even public issues a compile time error! Why? Which default modifier is used by the compiler in such cases?

share|improve this question
1  
How would you reference such classes from outside of the method? Is Java not verbose enough for you already? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 7 '11 at 15:13
    
My guest is that they cannot be accessed from any other class outside this static method so giving it a modifier does not make sense. –  gigadot Nov 7 '11 at 15:15
    
... cannot have any modifiers ... it looks like you can make them final or abstract:D –  OldCurmudgeon Nov 7 '11 at 15:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A inner class defined inside a method is treated as any variable declared in that method - and those variables are LOCAL. A local variable or class cannot have any modifiers besides FINAL.

The inner classes defined within another class are treated as instance variables, thus an instance class or a variable can be public private or have no identifier.

share|improve this answer
    
This pretty much sums up the response that I had in mind. –  Sid Nov 7 '11 at 15:20

That's because you declared it inside a method, not directly inside a class. You cannot decrease or increase the visibility of such a method-local class/variable. It would not make any sense anyway, it's always method-local only and you cannot access it from outside. The default modifier is just the "default" visibility (i.e. no additional modifiers).

share|improve this answer

In Java, a class can never be qualified to be either private or protected. It can simply be public all the times. It's quite obvious, there is no question about it.

I am sorry, it is wrong. Top level Java classes may be public and package-protected (when not modifier is defined).

The answer to second question is simple. When you are defining inner class it can be accessed from outside: new Outside.Inner(). But if you define inner class into method you cannot arrive to this class from outside the method therefore public modifier is irrelevant there.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for indicating my mistake. –  Bhavesh Nov 7 '11 at 15:33

The reason is that these classes are defined on the stack. All method arguments and local variables are declared and initialized on the stack. Its nature is to constraint the visibility inside the method body.

Inner classes are defined in the heap therefore they are visible from other classes and there's a sense to have different modifiers applicable. Some inner classes may be visible to the outside world and some other not.

Here's an article on differences between Stack and Heap in Java.

share|improve this answer

Those are local-inner classes (defined inside a method). Any access modifiers are not allowed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.