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When i tried to convert the following class instance to JSON (using Jackson)

public class RPCRespond<Result> {

    private int code;
    private Result result;
    private boolean success;
    private String failureReason;

    public RPCRespond() {
        this.code = 0;
        this.success = true;
        this.result = null;
    }

    public RPCRespond(Result result) {
        this.code = 0;
        this.success = true;
        this.result = result;
    }

    public RPCRespond(int code, String failureReason) {
        this.code = code;
        this.success = false;
        this.failureReason = failureReason;
    }

    public RPCRespond(int code, String failureReason, Object... args) {
        this.code = code;
        this.success = false;
        this.failureReason = String.format(failureReason, args);
    }

    public Result getResult() {
        return result;
    }


    public void setSuccess(boolean success) {
        this.success = success;
    }

    public String getFailureReason() {
        return failureReason;
    }

    public void setFailureReason(String failureReason) {
        this.failureReason = failureReason;
    }

    public int getCode() {
        return code;
    }

    public boolean getSuccess() {
        return success;
    }

    @Transient
    public String getAsJSON() {

        String json = "";

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        json = mapper.writeValueAsString(this) ; 

        return json ;
    }

}

it get into infinite loop of:

 at sun.reflect.GeneratedMethodAccessor48.invoke(Unknown Source)    at
 sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:43)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:601)     at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.BeanPropertyWriter.get(BeanPropertyWriter.java:483)
    at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.BeanPropertyWriter.serializeAsField(BeanPropertyWriter.java:418)
    at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.std.BeanSerializerBase.serializeFields(BeanSerializerBase.java:150)
    at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.BeanSerializer.serialize(BeanSerializer.java:112)
    at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.StdSerializerProvider._serializeValue(StdSerializerProvider.java:610)
    at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.StdSerializerProvider.serializeValue(StdSerializerProvider.java:256)
    at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper._configAndWriteValue(ObjectMapper.java:2566)
    at
 org.codehaus.jackson.map.ObjectMapper.writeValueAsString(ObjectMapper.java:2088)

The initiation of the RPCRespond is done by

User u = new User() ;
u.setFirstName("aaaa") ;
RPCRespond<User> result = new RPCRespond<User>(u) ;

result.setSuccess(true) ;

return result.getAsJSON() ;

How can I convert RPCRespond to JSON?

share|improve this question
1  
Totally unrelated, but the ctor signatures leave me a little cold--I'd rather see little factories that explicitly name success/failure status rather than a ctor with spooky semantics. Also not sure why you set the string to blank then immediately overwrite it with the JSON. –  Dave Newton Nov 7 '11 at 16:27
    
I removed some code for simplicity of the question –  oferbu Nov 7 '11 at 17:26
1  
Did you try using the @JsonIgnore annotation? I don't know if it'll skip @Transient properties by default. Is this a Hibernate entity? –  Dave Newton Nov 7 '11 at 17:30
    
user is pojo object with no hibernate annotations, yet. I do plan to add them later. where do you suggest to add @jsonignore? –  oferbu Nov 7 '11 at 18:08
    
To the getter that's likely causing the infinite loop. –  Dave Newton Nov 7 '11 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 30 down vote accepted

By default Jackson will serialize via get methods. Once it hits the getAsJson method, poom, infinite loop. Mark it with the @JsonIgnore annotation.

@JsonIgnore
public String getAsJSON() {
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    return mapper.writeValueAsString(this) ; 
}

You can also configure Jackson to serialize based on properties only, which may eliminate the need for the @JsonIgnore, but that may or may not meet your needs.

I believe the latest Jackson allows the choice of using the Hibernate @Transient annotation, although I'm not sure how to configure it (recent change).

share|improve this answer
8  
(An explanation/exposition on downvoting is generally appreciated.) –  Dave Newton Jan 8 '13 at 0:04
    
@JsonIgnore saved my day –  Tanmay Mandal Dec 4 '13 at 7:22

As others have suggested, this is most likely due to cyclic references; by default Jackson does not handle such dependencies.

You can either try skipping serialization of that property, or, if it's of parent/child type linkage, annotate it as such (see "bi-directional references" entry at Jackson Wiki for more details).

For what it's worth, generic types do not cause this (i.e. it's probably just a coincidence here); cyclic types are perfectly fine.

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