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I was just staring at the following code and wondered if there was really a need to fill 12 lines of source.

    private static IUnityContainer _container;
    public static IUnityContainer Container
    {
        get
        {
            return _container;
        }
        set
        {
            _container = value;
        }
    }

My thought is, why not just one?

    public static IUnityContainer Container;

I think the answer is something like "you can't break encapsulation".. Is this more of a knee jerk reaction to conditioning, or are there some other reasons, subtle or otherwise?

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1  
It's exactly the same. See here for some more info. –  CodeCaster Nov 7 '11 at 15:58
3  
It's not exactly the same. Here he's talking about a field VS a property for which there are hundreds of discussions to be found via a simple Google. Your link talks about Automatic Properties and the differences. –  Jamie Dixon Nov 7 '11 at 16:01
1  
@CodeCaster its not exactly the same. Your link shows, that an automtic implementet property is the same than an manual implemented, but in this question it is a field and a property. –  DanielB Nov 7 '11 at 16:02
1  
His example is not an auto prop - no {get;set;} –  Richard Friend Nov 7 '11 at 16:02
    
Sorry, you're right, I missed the missing of the {get; set;} part. –  CodeCaster Nov 7 '11 at 16:04

2 Answers 2

Well, until you don't want to use reflection in some strange ways, like GetType().GetProperty("Container" ...) there are no drawbacks.

It is however considered unclean to expose a field, a property is usually cleaner from a purist point of view.

FxCop will warn you that it is a not nice thing, but there are not drawbacks.

If you want to be short but clean in the same time, you can just use automatic properties:

public static IUnityContainer Container { get; set; }

Automatic properties however works only since compiler version 3.0.

A possible drawback that can happen is if you or someone pass that field byref in some function, for example, Interlocked.Exchange(ref MyClass.MyStaticField, null); It will not work anymore if you change it with a property in the future, so you should be careful in not passing that field by reference. If you just use a property from the beginning you cannot have this problem. This problem cannot happen with static readonly fields, they cannot be passed by reference. Using static readonly fields is quite common.

A situation where fields should absolutely not be used instead of properties is when you have a class that inherits MarshalByRefObject, used for remoting (RPC, remote procedure call).

Here I post an example, and as I said, is not your case since the problem is with instance fields and not with static fields.

public class MyClass :
    MarshalByRefObject
{
    public int MyValue;
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var obj = new MyClass();

        // This will give you warning CS1690: Accessing a member on 'MyValue' may cause a runtime exception because it is a field of a marshal-by-reference class
        Console.WriteLine(obj.MyValue.ToString());
    }
}

Remote procedure call works only with methods and properties, for this reason the compiler gives you a warning, since a MarshalByRefObject can be called inside another AppDomain or by another process or another computer via TCP/IP for example.

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1  
Can you elaborate just a little on your comment about MarshapByReference? I didn't quite understand that, and would like to. Thanks for the helpful info. –  Aaron Anodide Nov 7 '11 at 16:03
1  
Automatic properties have to do with compiler not with the framework. You can target older framework and still use automatic properties in latest compiler. –  Hasan Khan Nov 7 '11 at 16:25
    
Yes right, thanks :) corrected. –  Salvatore Previti Nov 7 '11 at 16:33

Personally, I think of it this way. Let's say that at some later time, I want to establish an inavariant that "Container" is never null. If it's defined as a public field, the way to enforce this would be to seek out each and every client that uses it and put code in preventing it from being set to null. If I have it as a property, the same can be accomplished with something like:

private static IUnityContainer _container = new ContainerImpl();
public static IUnityContainer Container
{
    get
    {
        return _container;
    }
    set
    {
        _container = value ?? _container;
    }
}

Or, you could throw an exception on null value to be more expressive. The specifics aren't important, but the encapsulation angle is.

So, I think that's not simply a knee-jerk reaction, but a pragmatic and reasonable one, especially in the face of the static keyword. Without encapsulation, that's literally just a global variable. At least encapsulating the global state allows the provider some semblance of control over it, rather than leaking control all over the entire application and trusting/forcing clients to be consistent.

One might look at it as a matter of "Don't Repeat Yourself". Any common logic when it comes to a field will necessarily be duplicated all over the place.

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Well both if you have a field or an automatic property, you are always free to change the code without side effects, except of course you try to pass the field byref in some function. –  Salvatore Previti Nov 7 '11 at 17:22

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