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I have a list as follows:

A= [('1', 3), ('2', 7), ('3', 5), ('1', 7), ('2', 5), ('3', 1)]

From the list A, I would like to generate the output list like this:

Average = [('1', 5), ('2', 6), ('3', 2)]

Any tips would be really grateful! =)

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2  
how do you compute your average for the "3" key ? –  Cédric Julien Nov 7 '11 at 16:01
    
@Cédric: I'd assume it is a typo. Any other value is indeed the average. –  Felix Kling Nov 7 '11 at 16:02

4 Answers 4

from collections import defaultdict
a = [('1', 3), ('2', 7), ('3', 5), ('1', 7), ('2', 5), ('3', 1)]
d = defaultdict(list)
for k, v in a:
    d[k].append(v)
avg = [(k, sum(v) // len(v)) for k, v in d.iteritems()]
print avg

prints

[('1', 5), ('3', 3), ('2', 6)]

Note that this uses integer division to compute the averages. You might want to use floating point division instead.

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Thank you so much for your tip! :) Yes, I was thinking of how to use floating point division here.... any tips? Again, thanks so much!! :) –  maria Nov 7 '11 at 16:19
    
@maria: Use sum(v, 0.0) / len(v) instead of sum(v) // len(v). –  Sven Marnach Nov 7 '11 at 16:27
    
@ Sven: can I ask you one more question? when I put float number as a value, it doesn't work. for example,>>> print result {'1': [3.2, 7.3, 4.2], '3': [5.2, 1.6, 6.3], '2': [7.7, 5.1, 2.5]} >>> avg = [(k, sum(v, 0.0) / len(v)) for k, v, in result.iteritems()] Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: 'float' object is not callable –  maria Nov 7 '11 at 16:55
    
@maria: Can't reproduce the error -- it seems to work fine. (Please click the link.) Maybe you overwrote the built-in sum() function by a variable of the same name? –  Sven Marnach Nov 7 '11 at 17:14
    
Got it. For some reason, it didn't work in the one server while it works in the other server. I guess it happened due to the different python version. Thank you so much for your wonderful help Sven! :D –  maria Nov 7 '11 at 17:20

In a simple way :

result = {}
for key, value in A:
   result.setdefault(key, []).append(value)

print [(k, sum(v) // len(v) for k,v in result.iteritems()]
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If you're always using setdefault then a defaultdict is definitely the way to go. –  agf Nov 7 '11 at 16:12
1  
@agf: I don't agree. In this case, code readability of both versions is the same, and this version is shorter and faster. –  Sven Marnach Nov 7 '11 at 16:35
    
@agf : right, let's say I'm compatible with python2.4 and older ;) –  Cédric Julien Nov 7 '11 at 16:36

Do you like to abstract code and reuse patterns? If that's the case, this group function is a useful pattern to have in your toolset. It's similar to itertools.groupby, but it works with non-consecutive elements and categorizes/maps in a single iteration (credits for the idea to Ruby Facets' map_by):

def group(seq, callback=None):
    result = {}
    for category, item in (callback(seq) if callback else seq):
        result.setdefault(category, []).append(item)
    return result 

average = dict((k, sum(vs)/len(vs)) for (k, vs) in group(xs).items())
print(average)
# {'1': 5.0, '3': 3.0, '2': 6.0}
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One-liner.

a= [('1', 3), ('2', 7), ('3', 5), ('1', 7), ('2', 5), ('3', 1)]
map(lambda f:(f[0][0], (lambda g:sum(g)/len(g))(f[1])), map(lambda e:zip(*e), map(lambda c:filter(lambda d:d[0]==c, a), set(map(lambda b:b[0], a)))))
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Your code is clever and I'm sure it was fun to write, but you get a -1 for succumbing to one-liner-itis. Also, this code will be inscrutable to many. And terribly inefficient. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 7 '11 at 19:07

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