Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently do a review of a C# app in which I see that :

public static bool ServiceExists(string servicename)
{
    ServiceController[] services = ServiceController.GetServices();
    foreach (ServiceController s in services)
    {
        if (s.ServiceName == servicename)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

In this answer, Henk said that the non-use of Dispose() (or using) will not generate memory leaks, true or false?

Can I keep the previous code has it is or should I write someting like :

public static bool ServiceExists(string servicename)
{
    ServiceController[] services = ServiceController.GetServices();
    bool exists = false;

    foreach (ServiceController s in services)
    {
        using(s)
        {
            if (s.ServiceName == servicename)
            {
                exists = true;
            }
        }
    }

    return exists;
}

What are the risks to no using Dispose() (or using) in this case?

share|improve this question
    
Wrong example. This method does not own th services. It shouldn't Dispose() them. And the 2nd version only disposes some of them. –  Henk Holterman Nov 7 '11 at 16:50
    
@HenkHolterman: I edited the 2nd version including your remark. On what can I base me to know if yes or no I should call Dispose()? –  Arnaud F. Nov 7 '11 at 16:59
    
Only when the GetServices() method clearly documents that the responsibility shifts to the caller. Your version could very well result in runtime errors. –  Henk Holterman Nov 7 '11 at 17:05
1  
The object that OWNS the ServiceControllers should be the one to initiate Dispose on them. If GetServices() is creating new instances of ServiceControllers, then you should initiate Dispose in this method. Otherwise, the Dispose method should be called by the object that 'owns' these ServiceControllers. –  docmanhattan Nov 7 '11 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A correctly written object shouldn't cause a memory leak if it's Dispose method isn't called. These days a .Net object which controls unmanaged resources should be doing so via a SafeHandle instance. These will ensure the native memory is freed even if Dispose is not called.

However it's very possible for objects which aren't written correctly to produce memory leaks if Dispose isn't called. I've seen many examples of such objects.

In general though if you are using an IDisposable instance which you own you should always call Dispose. Even if the object is correctly written it's to your benefit that unmanaged resources get cleaned up earlier instead of later.

EDIT

As James pointed out in the comments there is one case where not calling Dispose could cause a memory leak. Some objects use the Dispose callback to unhook from long lived events which if they stayed attached to would cause the object to reside in memory and constitute a leak. Yet another reason to always call Dispose

share|improve this answer
1  
What about the case of the event handler which is unhooked in Dispose? –  James L Nov 7 '11 at 16:36
1  
@JamesL i'll update my answer to talk about that. –  JaredPar Nov 7 '11 at 16:38

It all depends on what ServiceController.GetServices() is doing. If it is creating new instances of ServiceControllers when it is called, then it could cause a memory leak depending on what it needs to do (the ServiceController) in its Dispose method.

That said, adding 'using' in this case wouldn't fix it anyway as if you DID need to call dispose (implicitly via 'using' in this case) on each instance, it WOULDN'T as it returns whenever it finds a ServiceController with a matching name.

Therefore, if your first iteration found a matching ServiceController, all the other ServiceControllers wouldn't get disposed of anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, I edited the 2nd example –  Arnaud F. Nov 7 '11 at 16:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.