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I got the runtime error message Write T1 binary.Read: invalid type main.T1

package main

import (
    "encoding/binary"
    "net"
)

type T1 struct {
    f1 [5]byte
    f2 int
}

func main() {
    conn, _ := net.Dial("tcp", ":12345")
    l1 := T1{[5]byte{'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'}, 1234}
    binary.Write(conn, binary.BigEndian, &l1)
}

I wish to use the endian auto convert function, how could I do? By the way, is there more efficient way?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use exported fixed size fields. For example,

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "encoding/binary"
    "fmt"
)

type T struct {
    F1 [5]byte
    F2 int32
}

func main() {
    var t1, t2 T
    t1 = T{[5]byte{'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'}, 1234}
    fmt.Println("t1:", t1)
    buf := new(bytes.Buffer)
    err := binary.Write(buf, binary.BigEndian, &t1)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    err = binary.Read(buf, binary.BigEndian, &t2)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
    }
    fmt.Println("t2:", t2)
}

Output:

t1: {[97 98 99 100 101] 1234}
t2: {[97 98 99 100 101] 1234}
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Quoting exactomundo from binary/encoding docs:

A fixed-size value is either a fixed-size arithmetic type (int8, uint8, int16, float32, complex64, ...) or an array or struct containing only fixed-size values.

And therefore:

type T1 struct {
    f1 [5]uint8
    f2 int32
}

works here.

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