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UPDATE based on the answer by @BrianFisher below, I tried this:

SELECT np.id AS people_id, np.first_name, np.last_name, ur.rid
FROM new_people np
LEFT JOIN institute.users_roles ur ON np.institute_uid = ur.uid
AND ur.rid =8
LEFT JOIN roster r ON np.id = r.people_id
WHERE np.company_id =1
AND np.active =1
AND (r.roster_id IS NULL OR NOT (r.status =  'pending' OR r.status =  'submitted'))
ORDER BY np.last_name, np.first_name

It seems to work; it does return what I want returned. Can anyone tell me if there's a reason it shouldn't work, or might not work with a larger data set? (i.e. is it just coincidence that it worked this time? Is it bad practice to nest statements inside an AND like that?)

===================================

SELECT np.id AS people_id, np.first_name, np.last_name, ur.rid
FROM new_people np
LEFT JOIN institute.users_roles ur ON np.institute_uid = ur.uid
AND ur.rid =8

LEFT JOIN roster r ON np.id = r.people_id
WHERE np.company_id =1
AND np.active =1
AND NOT (
r.status =  'pending'
OR r.status =  'submitted'
)
ORDER BY np.last_name, np.first_name

EDIT - I've also tried the query like this with the same result:

SELECT np.id AS people_id, np.first_name, np.last_name, ur.rid
FROM new_people np
LEFT JOIN institute.users_roles ur ON np.institute_uid = ur.uid
AND ur.rid =8

LEFT JOIN roster r ON np.id = r.people_id AND NOT (r.status =  'pending'
OR r.status =  'submitted')

WHERE np.company_id =1
AND np.active =1

ORDER BY np.last_name, np.first_name

new_people:
id      first_name      last_name   institute_uid   company_id
==      ==========      =========   =============   ==========
1       Tester          Jones       100             1
2       Tester          Smith       200             1
3       Tester          Brown       300             1
4       Tester          White       400             1

users_roles:
uid    rid
===    ===
100    8
200    8
300    8
400    8

roster:
roster_id   people_id   company_id   status
=========   =========   ==========   ======
8           1           1            completed
15          2           1            submitted
23          3           1            pending

What I want this query to return is records for Tester Jones (people_id 1) because his roster record is not either pending or submitted, and Tester White, because he doesn't have a roster record at all. The query as it is returns Tester Jones, but not Tester White. How do I get it to include someone from the new_people table specifically because they DON'T have a record in the roster table? I've tried JOIN, LEFT JOIN, RIGHT JOIN, INNER JOIN on the roster table; they all return the same thing.

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try

SELECT np.id AS people_id, np.first_name, np.last_name, ur.rid
FROM new_people np
LEFT JOIN institute.users_roles ur ON np.institute_uid = ur.uid
AND ur.rid =8

LEFT JOIN roster r ON np.id = r.people_id 

WHERE np.company_id =1
AND np.active =1
AND (r.roster_id IS NULL OR r.status =  'pending' OR r.status =  'submitted')

ORDER BY np.last_name, np.first_name
share|improve this answer
    
That returns two copies of Tester Jones, but still does not return Tester White. Also, I need items where r.status <> pending and <> submitted, not equal to. However, this did prompt me to try something else. I'm editing the original post to display what SEEMS to work. –  EmmyS Nov 7 '11 at 17:26
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