Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm attempting to eliminate the duplication accross two ASP.NET web projects that use exactly the same code to create a DI container.

I ran into the problem of not being able mark a static as abstract.

Here's the code that is duplicated:

namespace LendingTreeLib
{
    public class Global : HttpApplication, IContainerAccessor
    {
        void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            BuildContainer();
        }

        void Application_End(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            CleanUp();
        }

        protected static void CleanUp()
        {
            if (Container != null)
            {
                Container.Dispose();
            }
        }

        private static IUnityContainer _container;

        public static IUnityContainer Container
        {
            get
            {
                return _container;
            }
            set
            {
                _container = value;
            }
        }

        IUnityContainer IContainerAccessor.Container
        {
            get
            {
                return Container;
            }
        }

        protected static void BuildContainer()
        {
            IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();

//     ----------------------------------------------------------------
// --> this is where a call to an virtual/abstract seems to be required
//     ----------------------------------------------------------------

            Container = container;
        }
    }
}

Any thoughts on how I can achieve my goal?

UPDATE: I think I may have asked this when I could solve it myself, however, I'm going to post my solution here because it would have been helpful to me before I learned it..

Since Application_Start is only called once, and it is also an instance method, there doesn't appear to be any harm in simply switching to non-static methods for my solution.

Here it is (with extra indirection taken out):

namespace DAgents.Common.Web
{
    public abstract class GlobalBase : HttpApplication, IContainerAccessor
    {
        void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            var container = new UnityContainer();
            RegisterTypes(container);
            GlobalBase.Container = container;
        }

        protected abstract void RegisterTypes(IUnityContainer container);

        public static IUnityContainer Container { get; set; }

        void Application_End(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if (Container != null)
                Container.Dispose();
        }

        IUnityContainer IContainerAccessor.Container { get { return GlobalBase.Container; } }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Does BuildContainer() need to be static? If it can be made an instance member, then I think that would solve the problem, right? Also, have you seen WebActivator and PreApplicationStartMethod? - ilearnable.net/2010/11/22/… May be able to solve reusability with this instead –  Russ Cam Nov 7 '11 at 17:03
    
maybe i gave up too quickly... that's the problem sometimes when you know people who know more than you are an SO quest. away :) –  Aaron Anodide Nov 7 '11 at 17:04
1  
The short answer is no, the long answer is here: [Why can't I have abstract static methods in C#?][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/3284/… –  rick schott Nov 7 '11 at 17:05
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In response to the question,

No.

A static method cannot be abstract, since static methods are not inherited.

An abstract cannot be static, since static methods must have an implementation.

C# and Java don't work this way (as yet.) It leads me to the moot and unhelpful question, are static methods Object Orientated?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.