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Passing this code through jsHint:

var A = function (spec) { 
  "use strict";
  var a = function () {
    return b();
  };

  var b = function () {
    return 5;
  };

  a();
};

returns this error:

Line 4: return b();
'b' is not defined.

I understand this might have to do with "hoisting" as explained here: JavaScript function order: why does it matter?

However, the following code returns the same error:

var A = function (spec) { 
  "use strict";
  function a () {
    return b();
  }

  function b () {
    return 5;
  }

  a();
};

If I understand correctly, at least the second code snippet should not return an error. Am I mistaken?

Even considering the hoisting mechanism, I still do not understand why the first code snippet should be wrong. Function a is only called after function b is defined, so b would be in a's closure. Is my code wrong or is jsHint wrong?

I understand that this question is purely academic, because the code works as expected in all browser. Nevertheless, I'd like to know why jsHint throws an error.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a false positive in jsLint.
Both of your code snippets work fine.

Ignore the warning.

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I don't know why jsLint (and its fork) ignores function statement hoisting. –  SLaks Nov 7 '11 at 18:31
    
I thought that this is covered by several issues in their github: 61, 47, 29. 29 is closed in March 2011 with comment that the issue is fixed (in their master branch anyways). –  jonemo Nov 7 '11 at 19:01

The first example is a hoisting problem because a() references b() before it's declared. The solution is to have 'var a, b;' after your "use strict"; statement.

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jsHint is trying to help you by pointing out potential problems and non-conventional code.

In this case, it's not happy because it might be difficult for a human to understand -- even though it's perfectly valid Javascript.

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