Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

1) Given 2 arrays containing elements of a complete Binary tree(level by level), without actually reconstructing a tree(i.e. by only doing swaps in an array), how can I find whether those 2 arrays are isomorphic or not ?

2) A better solution if one isomorphic tree forms a Binary Search Tree.

update e.g.

     5 
    / \
    4  7
   /\  /\
  2  3 6 8

can be represented in array as 5 4 7 2 3 6 8

Isomorphic trees are trees which can be converted to one another by rotation about nodes

     5 
    / \
    4  7
   /\  /\
  2  3 6 8



     5 
    / \
    4  7
   /\  /\
  3  2 6 8



     5 
    / \
    4  7
   /\  /\
  3  2 8 6



     5 
    / \
    7  4
   /\  /\
  8  6 3 2
share|improve this question
    
can you define "isomorphic arrays"? –  amit Nov 7 '11 at 18:45
    
If they represent 2 isomorphic trees –  user401445 Nov 7 '11 at 18:47
    
what's "order by order" and how do you represent the tree in an array (how do you know the connections?) first element is the root, 2nd and 3rd are the left and right childs and so on...? –  Karoly Horvath Nov 7 '11 at 19:21
    
Can you provide an example? On the face of it - assuming BST is Binary Search Tree - the order used by searching defines the relative location of the keys placed in the tree, and since both trees are complete, I would expect the arrays to be identical if the trees are isomorphic. –  mcdowella Nov 7 '11 at 19:26
    
@mcdowella: complete trees are "complete" except for the deepest level where the nodes are filled from the left. –  Karoly Horvath Nov 7 '11 at 19:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the first problem:

A bit of notation:

  • t0, t1 - trees
  • value(t) - the number stored at node
  • left(t) - the left subtree
  • right(t) - the right subtree

t1 and t2 are isomorphic, iff t1 and t2 are empty,

or value (t1) == value (t2)

and

either left(t1) is isomorphic to left(t2) and right(t1) is isomorphic to right(t2),

or left(t1) is isomorphic to right(t2) and right(t1) is isomorphic to left(t2)

Assuming the trees are stored in an arrays, such that element 0 is the root and and if t is an index of an internal node 2t+1 and 2t+2 are indices of its immediate children, straightforward implementation:

#include <stdio.h>

#define N 7

int a[] = { 5, 4, 7, 2, 3, 6, 8 };
int b[] = { 5, 7, 4, 6, 8, 2, 3 };

int
is_isomorphic (int t1, int t2)
{
  if (t1 >= N && t2 >= N)
    return 1;

  if (a [t1] != b [t2])
    return 0;

  return ((is_isomorphic (2*t1 + 1, 2*t2 + 1)
           && is_isomorphic (2*t1 + 2, 2*t2 + 2))
          || (is_isomorphic (2*t1 + 1, 2*t2 + 2)
              && is_isomorphic (2*t1 + 2, 2*t2 + 1)));
}

int main ()
{
  printf ("%s\n", (is_isomorphic (0, 0) ? "yes" : "no"));
  return 0;
}

For the second problem, at each step, we compare the subtree of a with the smaller root to the subtree of b with the smaller root and then the subtree of a with the bigger root to the subtree of b with the bigger root (smaller and bigger than the current roots of a and b).

int
is_isomorphic_bst (int t1, int t2)
{
  if (t1 >= N && t2 >= N)
    return 1;

  if (a [t1] != b [t2])
    return 0;

  int t1l, t1r, t2l, t2r;
  if (a [2*t1 + 1] < a [t1] && a [t1] < a [2*t1 + 2])
    {
      t1l = 2*t1 + 1;
      t1r = 2*t1 + 2;
    }
  else if (a [2*t1 + 1] > a [t1] && a [t1] > a [2*t1 + 2])
    {
      t1l = 2*t1 + 2;
      t1r = 2*t1 + 1;
    }
  else
    return 0;

  if (b [2*t2 + 1] < b [t2] && b [t2] < b [2*t2 + 2])
    {
      t2l = 2*t2 + 1;
      t2r = 2*t2 + 2;
    }
  else if (b [2*t2 + 1] > b [t2] && b [t2] > b [2*t2 + 2])
    {
      t2l = 2*t2 + 2;
      t2r = 2*t2 + 1;
    }
  else
    return 0;

  return is_isomorphic_bst (t1l, t2l) && is_isomorphic_bst (t1r, t2r);
}
share|improve this answer
    
for second part it is possible that none of them are BST. We only know that one of their isomorphic form is BST. It can be either of them or none of them –  user401445 Nov 8 '11 at 15:27
    
@user401445, ok then at each step, we compare the subtree with smaller root from one tree to the subtree with smaller root from the other tree and then compare the other couple of subtrees, I will edit the function in a minute. –  chill Nov 8 '11 at 15:44

You could do an in-order tree walk on both of them simultaneously and check whether the elements are the same.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question. Can you give an example for your solution –  user401445 Nov 8 '11 at 3:41
    
that's not a BST!! –  Karoly Horvath Nov 8 '11 at 10:54

Taking part (2) first, swap pairs of nodes - and their descendants - at each level, as necessary to turn each tree into a binary search tree, with left nodes <= right nodes. This will take time n log n. Once you have done this, if you had a binary search tree and a tree isomorphic with a binary search tree, you now have two binary search trees. As pointed out by yi_H, this means that an in-order tree walk will show the same elements in the same order if both trees are isomorphic. But an in-order tree walk, in a tree stored in an array as in your examples, is just a peculiar way of visiting all the elements of the array, so if the trees are isomorphic the two arrays must be identical.

The easiest way to handle part (1) is if you can find additional space. For the lowest level of each tree, build a hash table for each tree holding the leaves. Compare the two hash tables and exit if they do not hold the same set of nodes. Give each leaf an identifier that identifies it, where the identifiers are the same if the leaves are the same. For the parents of those leaves, build another hash table, using the values at each parent and the identifiers of those children. Again, check that the two sets are the same and exit if not. Assign each parent an identifier that is the same if the value at the node is the same and the identifiers of its children are the same. You can carry on in this way up the tree until you reach the root. If all the sets are the same all the way up, you have two isomorphic trees, and the identifiers give you the correspondence at each level. This is more complex than part (1) and takes extra space, but only linear time.

share|improve this answer

For BST:

  1. Take the first elements of both arrays and match. If not equal then BST are not be same.
  2. Find the first left children that has not been scanned (at the positions leftPos1 and leftPos2) and match. If not matched then BST are not same.
  3. Find the first right children that has not been scanned (at the positions rightPos1 and rightPos2) and match. If not matched then BST are not same.
  4. If both left and right children match, the perform the same operations recursively on the two pair of sublists/subtree (from leftPos1 and leftPos2) and (from rightPos1 and rightPos2). The parent of these subtree is the first element of the array.

While searching the left and right children in the sublist, there may be elements that are already scanned. To find out such elements, verify that element that it can be the children of the current subtree. If the current subtree is at left hand side of the parent, then compare the element with the parent, if it belong to the right hand side then ignore that element.

#include <stdio.h>

#define BOOL int
#define TRUE 1
#define FALSE 0

BOOL isLeft(int parent, int child) {
    return child <= parent;
}

BOOL isRight(int parent, int child) {
    return child > parent;
}

BOOL isBelongToChild(int parent, int child, int value) {
    if (isLeft(parent, child) && (isLeft(parent, value))) {
        return TRUE;
    }
    if (isRight(parent, child) && (isRight(parent, value))) {
        return TRUE;
    }
    return FALSE;
}

int getLeftPosition(int * array, int size, int parent, BOOL parentExists) {
    int i;

    int first = *array;
    for (i = 1; i < size; i++) {
        int value = *(array + i);
        if (! isBelongToChild(parent, first, value)) {
            continue;
        }
        if (isLeft(first, value)) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

int getRightPosition(int * array, int size, int parent, BOOL parentExists) {
    int i;

    int first = *array;
    for (i = 1; i < size; i++) {
        int value = *(array + i);
        if (! isBelongToChild(parent, first, value)) {
            continue;
        }
        if (isRight(first, value)) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

BOOL areSame(int * array1, int pos1, int * array2, int pos2) {
    if (pos1 == -1 && pos2 == -1) {
        return TRUE;
    } else if (*(array1 + pos1) == *(array2 + pos2)) {
        return TRUE;
    } else {
        return FALSE;
    }
}

BOOL isSameBst(int * array1, int size1, int * array2, int size2, int parent, BOOL parentExists) {
    if (0 == size1 && 0 == size2) {
        return TRUE;
    }
    if (*array1 != *array2) {
        return FALSE;
    }

    int leftPos1 = getLeftPosition(array1, size1, parent, parentExists);
    int leftPos2 = getLeftPosition(array2, size2, parent, parentExists);
    if (! areSame(array1, leftPos1, array2, leftPos2)) {
        return FALSE;
    }
    int rightPos1 = getRightPosition(array1, size1, parent, parentExists);
    int rightPos2 = getRightPosition(array2, size2, parent, parentExists);
    if (! areSame(array1, rightPos1, array2, rightPos2)) {
        return FALSE;
    }

    if (leftPos1 > -1) {
        int result = isSameBst((array1 + leftPos1), size1 - leftPos1, (array2 + leftPos2), size2 - leftPos2, *array1, TRUE);
        if (FALSE == result) {
            return FALSE;
        }
    }
    if (rightPos1 > -1) {
        int result = isSameBst((array1 + rightPos1), size1 - rightPos1, (array2 + rightPos2), size2 - rightPos2, *array1, TRUE);
        if (FALSE == result) {
            return FALSE;
        }
    }
    return TRUE;
}

int main ()
{
    int a[] = { 5, 6, 2, 7, 4 };
    int b[] = { 5, 6, 7, 2, 4 };
    printf ("%s\n", (isSameBst(a, 5, b, 5, 0, FALSE) ? "yes" : "no"));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.