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When is it recommended to use git rebase vs. git merge?

Do I still need to merge after a successful rebase?

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See: stackoverflow.com/questions/457927/… –  TStamper Apr 29 '09 at 20:27
    
Added clarification on the two rebase scenario, as requested. –  VonC Apr 29 '09 at 21:10
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I found this blog post to be a great answer: gitguru.com/2009/02/03/rebase-v-merge-in-git –  Ztyx Jul 3 '12 at 9:08
    
This may also help with the bigger picture: stackoverflow.com/a/9204499/631619 –  Michael Durrant Apr 14 '13 at 21:01
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8 Answers

Short Version

  • Merge takes all the changes in one branch and merge them into another branch in one commit.
  • Rebase says I want the point at which I branched to move to a new starting point

So when do you use either one?

Merge

  • Let's say you have created a branch for the purpose of developing a single feature. When you want to bring those changes back to master, you probably want merge (you don't care about maintaining all of the interim commits).

Rebase

  • A second scenario would be if you started doing some development and then another developer made an unrelated change. You probably want to pull and then rebase to base your changes from the current version from the repo.
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+1 I really like your "short version". –  sleske Oct 9 '11 at 18:21
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Yeah, it's very succinct. Great for reference –  dmarges Nov 7 '12 at 16:22
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@Rob mentioned maintaining interim commits when merging. I believe by default merging branch B (a feature branch you've been working on) into branch M (the master branch) will create one commit in M for each commit that was made in B since the two diverged. But if you merge using the --squash option, all of the commits made on branch B will be "lumped together" and merged as a single commit on branch M, keeping the log on your master branch nice and clean. Squashing is probably what you want if you have numerous developers working independently and merging back into master. –  spaaarky21 Jan 24 '13 at 21:46
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I believe @spaaarky21's assumption about merging is not correct. If you merge a branch B into the master M, there will be only a single commit on M (even if B has multiple commits), regardless of whether you use a plain or --squash merge. What --squash will do is eliminate the reference to B as a parent. A good visualization is here: syntevo.com/smartgithg/howtos.html?page=workflows.merge –  jpeskin May 26 '13 at 15:19
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@spaaarky21 It looks like we're both half right. When a fast-forward merge is possible (as in your example), git will default to including all commits in the feature branch B (or as you suggest, you can use --squash to combine into a single commit). But in the case where there are two divergent branches M and B that you are merging, git will not include all of the individual commits from branch B if merged into M (whether or not you use --squash). –  jpeskin May 28 '13 at 1:36
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To complement my own answer mentioned by TSamper,

  • a rebase is quite often a good idea to do before a merge, because the idea is that you integrate in your branch Y the work of the branch B upon which you will merge.
    But again, before merging, you resolve any conflict in your branch (i.e.: "rebase", as in "replay my work in my branch starting from a recent point from the branch B)
    If done correctly, the subsequent merge from your branch to branch B can be fast-forward.

  • a merge impact directly the destination branch B, which means the merges better be trivial, otherwise that branch B can be long to get back to a stable state (time for you solve all the conflicts)


the point of merging after a rebase?

In the case that I describe, I rebase B onto my branch, just to have the opportunity to replay my work from a more recent point from B, but while staying into my branch.
In this case, a merge is still needed to bring my "replayed" work onto B.

The other scenario (described in Git Ready for instance), is to bring your work directly in B through a rebase (which does conserve all your nice commits, or even give you the opportunity to re-order them through an interactive rebase).
In that case (where you rebase while being in the B branch), you are right: no further merge is needed:

A git tree at default when we have not merged nor rebased

rebase1

we get by rebasing:

rebase3

That second scenario is all about: how do I get new-feature back into master.

My point, by describing the first rebase scenario, is to remind everyone that a rebase can also be used as a preliminary step to that (that being "get new-feature back into master").
You can use rebase to first bring master "in" the new-feature branch: the rebase will replay new-feature commits from the HEAD master, but still in the new-feature branch, effectively moving your branch starting point from an old master commit to HEAD-master.
That allows you to resolve any conflicts in your branch (meaning, in isolation, while allowing master to continue to evolve in parallel if your conflict resolution stage takes too long).
Then you can switch to master and merge new-feature (or rebase new-feature onto master if you want to preserve commits done in your new-feature branch).

So:

  • "rebase vs. merge" can be viewed as two ways to import a work on, say, master.
  • But "rebase then merge" can be a valid workflow to first resolve conflict in isolation, then bring back your work.
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merge after rebase is a trivial fast forward without having to resolve conflicts. –  obecalp Apr 30 '09 at 19:32
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@obelcap: Indeed, this is kind of the idea: you take all the problem-conflict in your environment (rebase master within your new-feature branch), and then co master, merge new-feature: 1 pico-second (fast-forward) if master had no evolutions –  VonC Apr 30 '09 at 21:29
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Rebase is also nice because once you do eventually merge your stuff back into master (which is trivial as already described) you have it sitting at the "top" of your commit history. On bigger projects where features may be written but merged several weeks later, you don't want to just merge them into the master because they get "stuffed" into the master way back in the history. Personally I like being able to do git log and see that recent feature right at the "top." Note the commit dates are preserved - rebase doesn't change that information. –  Sean Schofield Sep 3 '09 at 14:11
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@Joe: mentally, you are saying "replay any of my changes (done in isolation in my private branch) on top of that other branch, but leave me in my private branch once the rebase is done". That is a good opportunity to clean-up the local history, avoiding "checkpoint commits", broken bisect and incorrect blame results. See "Git workflow": sandofsky.com/blog/git-workflow.html –  VonC Aug 15 '11 at 17:57
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@scoarescoare the key is to see how you local changes are compatible on top of the latest upstream branch. If one of your commit introduces a conflict, you will see it right away. A merge introduce only one (merged) commit, which might trigger many conflict without an easy way to see which one, amongst your own local commits, did add said conflict. So in addition to a cleaner history, you get a more precise view of the changes you introduce, commit by commit (replayed by the rebase), as opposed to all the changes introduced by the upstream branch (dumped into one single merge). –  VonC Jan 25 '13 at 6:17
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I experimented with a test repository and I finally I got it :) :)!

It's simple, with rebase you say to use another branch as the new base for your work so...

If you have for example a branch master and you create a branch to implement a new feature, say you name it cool-feature, of course the master branch is the base for your new feature.

Now at a certain point you want to add the new feature you implemented in the master branch. You could just switch to master and merge the cool-feature branch:

$git checkout master
$git merge cool-feature

but this way a new dummy commit is added, if you want to avoid spaghetti-history and of course be sexier you can rebase:

$git checkout master
$git rebase cool-feature

Alternatively if you want to resolve conflicts in your topic branch as VonC suggested you can rebase you branch this way:

$git checkout cool-feature
$git rebase master

and then merge it in master:

$git checkout master
$git merge cool-feature

This time, since the topic branch has the same commits of master plus the commits with the new feature, the merge will be just a fast-forward ;)

Now the question is...is it correct? Is rebase just a smarter merge? Did I understand it well or I was dreaming? It's difficult to find good documentation on rebase. I hope this will help and it's correct.

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great summary complete with the relevant git commands. –  Malcolm Sparks Dec 21 '12 at 10:33
    
Thanks @MalcolmSparks ...and Happy New Year ;)! –  Aldo 'xoen' Giambelluca Jan 3 '13 at 15:11
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This really helped me understand the workflow better than many other tutorials and guides I've read, thanks! –  haventchecked Mar 15 at 19:01
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thank you @haventchecked : I'm glad it's helping :) –  Aldo 'xoen' Giambelluca Mar 20 at 20:27
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Merge means: Create a single new commit that merges my changes into the destination.

Rebase means: Create a whole new series of commits, using my current set of commits as hints. In other words, calculate what my changes would have looked like if I had started making them from the point I'm rebasing on to. After the rebase, therefore, you might need to re-test your changes and during the rebase, you would possibly have a few conflicts.

Given this, why would you rebase? Just to keep the development history clear. Let's say you're working on feature X and when you're done, you merge your changes in. The destination will now have a single commit that would say something along the lines of "Added feature X". Now, instead of merging, if you rebased and then merged, the destination development history would contain all the individual commits in a single logical progression. This makes reviewing changes later on much easier. Imagine how hard you'd find it to review the development history if 50 developers were merging various features all the time.

That said, if you have already pushed the branch you're working on upstream, you should not rebase, but merge instead. For branches that have not been pushed upstream, rebase, test and merge.

Another time you might want to rebase is when you want to get rid of commits from your branch before pushing upstream. For example: Commits that introduce some debugging code early on and other commits further on that clean that code up. The only way to do this is by performing an interactive rebase: git rebase -i <branch/commit/tag>

UPDATE: You also want to use rebase when you're using Git to interface to a version control system that doesn't support non-linear history (subversion for example). When using the git-svn bridge, it is very important that the changes you merge back into subversion are a sequential list of changes on top of the most recent changes in trunk. There are only two ways to do that: (1) Manually re-create the changes and (2) Using the rebase command, which is a lot faster.

UPDATE2 : One additional way to think of a rebase is that it enables a sort of mapping from your development style to the style accepted in the repository you're committing to. Let's say you like to commit in small, tiny chunks. You have one commit to fix a typo, one commit to get rid of unused code and so on. By the time you've finished what you need to do, you have a long series of commits. Now let's say the repository you're committing to encourages large commits, so for the work you're doing, one would expect one or maybe two commits. How do you take your string of commits and compress them to what is expected? You would use an interactive rebase and squash your tiny commits into fewer larger chunks. The same is true if the reverse was needed - if your style was a few large commits, but the repo demanded long strings of small commits. You would use a rebase to do that as well. If you had merged instead, you have now grafted your commit style onto the main repository. If there are a lot of developers, you can imagine how hard it would be to follow a history with several different commit styles after some time.

UPDATE3: Does one still need to merge after a successful rebase? Yes, you do. The reason is that a rebase essentially involves a "shifting" of commits. As I've said above, these commits are calculated, but if you had 14 commits from the point of branching, then assuming nothing goes wrong with your rebase, you will be 14 commits ahead (of the point you're rebasing onto) after the rebase is done. You had a branch before a rebase. You will have a branch of the same length after. You still need to merge before you publish your changes. In other words, rebase as many times as you want (again, only if you have not pushed your changes upstream). Merge only after you rebase.

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A merge with master could result in a fast forward. In a feature branch there may be some commits, which have minor bugs or dont't even compile. If you do only unit testing in a feature branch, some errors in integration my slip through. Before merging with master, integration tests are required and can show some bugs. If these are fixed, the feature could be integrated. As you don't wish to commit buggy code to master, a rebase seems neccessary in order to prevent an all-commits-fast-forward. –  mbx Jul 15 '12 at 18:15
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before merge/rebase:

A <- B <- C    [master]
^
 \
  D <- E       [branch]

after git merge master:

A <- B <- C
^         ^
 \         \
  D <- E <- F

after git rebase master:

A <- B <- C <- D' <- E'

(A, B, C, D, E and F are commits)

this example and much more well illustrated info about git can be found here: http://excess.org/article/2008/07/ogre-git-tutorial/

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The pro git book as a really good explanation on the rebasing page.

Basically a merge will take 2 commits and combine them.

A rebase will go to the common ancestor on the 2 and incrementally apply the changes on top of each other. This makes for a 'cleaner' and more linear history.

But when you rebase you abandon previous commits and create new ones. So you should never rebase a repo that is public. The other people working on the repo will hate you.

For that reason alone I almost exclusively merge. 99% of the time my branches don’t differ that much, so if there are conflicts it's only in one or two places.

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Git rebase is used to make the branching paths in history cleaner and repository structure linear.

It is also used to keep the branches created by you private, as after rebasing and pushing the changes to server, if you delete your branch, there will be no evidence of branch you have worked upon. So your branch is now your local concern.

After doing rebase we also get rid of an extra commit which we used to see if we do normal merge.

And yes one still needs to do merge after a successful rebase as rebase command just puts your work on top of the branch you mentioned during rebase say master and makes the first commit of your branch as a direct descendant of the master branch. This means we can now do a fast forward merge to bring changes from this branch to master branch.

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A lot of answers here say that merging turns all your commits into one, and therefore suggest to use rebase to preserve your commits. This is wrong if you have pushed your commits already.

Merge does not obliterate your commits. Merge preserves history! (just look at gitk) Rebase rewrites history, which is a Bad Thing after you've pushed it.

Use merge -- not rebase whenever you've already pushed.

Here is Linus' (author of git) take on it. It's a really good read. Or you can read my own version of the same idea below.

Rebasing a branch on master:

  • provides an incorrect idea of how commits were created
  • pollutes master with a bunch of intermediate commits that may not have been well tested
  • could actually introduce build breaks on these intermediate commits because of changes that were made to master between when the original topic branch was created and when it was rebased.
  • makes finding good places in master to checkout difficult.
  • Causes the timestamps on commits to not align with their chronological order in the tree. So you would see that commit A precedes commit B in master, but commit B was authored first. (What?!)
  • Produces more conflicts because individual commits in the topic branch can each involve merge conflicts which must be individually resolved (Further lying in history about what happened in each commit).
  • is a rewrite of history. If the branch being rebased has been pushed anywhere (shared with anyone other than yourself) then you've screwed up everyone else who has that branch since you've rewritten history.

In contrast, merging a topic branch into master:

  • preserves history of where topic branches were created, including any merges from master to the topic branch to help keep it current. You really get an accurate idea of what code the developer was working with when they were building.
  • master is a branch made up mostly of merges, and each of those merge commits are typically 'good points' in history that are safe to check out because that's where the topic branch was ready to be integrated.
  • all the individual commits of the topic branch are preserved, including the fact that they were in a topic branch, so isolating those changes is natural and you can drill in where required.
  • merge conflicts only have to be resolved once (at the point of the merge) so intermediate commit changes made in the topic branch don't have to be resolved independently.
  • can be done multiple times smoothly. If you integrate your topic branch to master periodically, folks can keep building on the topic branch and it can keep being merged independently.
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