Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a simple control-flow GOTO question, nothing about resource allocation.

There are two levels of checking if a piece of data is "good". If and only if it passes the first check, we do the second check. If the data fails either test, we use a default value instead.

The second check involves a few steps with intermediate data, so we can't just put it in a short-circuited || condition. Furthermore, if the second test passes, we use the output of the second test instead of the original data.

This is the inner loop in a real-time processing situation, so efficiency is very important. We don't want to do any of the calculations more than once.

if (firstCheck(data)) {
    result = analyze(data);
    if (secondCheck(result)) {
        use_result(result);
    }
    else {
        goto FAIL;
    }
}
else {
FAIL:
    use_result(DEFAULT_VALUE);
}

This GOTO seems to satisfy all my requirements with maximal efficiency. I can think of some other ways to do it, but all would involve extra storage or conditionals. I am wary of GOTOs though. In fact, if I use this, it will be the first time I have ever used a GOTO. So please, help me find the way out!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use continue to go to next loop iteration

if (firstCheck(data)) {
    result = analyze(data);
    if (secondCheck(result)) {
        use_result(result);
        continue;
    }
}
use_result(DEFAULT_VALUE);
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting that both answers use "tricks" to make it work: continue is basically a restricted goto, and C's "assignment is an expression" idiom is a hack-provoking language feature IMO. Accepting this one because it gives me more flexibility with analyze() and secondCheck(), but upvoting both. –  japreiss Nov 7 '11 at 21:39

Well we can fix this without much work, but using a goto in this way isn't necessarily bad behavior - e.g. the linux kernel uses this convention for doing error handling in only one spot as well and I think the code is quite clear as is.

Using exceptions to fix this is obviously one solution, but this does cost performance in the error case, so I assume that's out of the question.

So if you want to, this should be fine:

if (firstCheck(data) && secondCheck(result = analyze(data)) {
    use_result(result);
}
else {
    // fail
}
share|improve this answer
    
use_result(result) is gonna fail because result is not defined. Plus, OP don't want to analyze more then once. –  gustavotkg Nov 7 '11 at 19:57
    
Oh you're right, better fix that. I don't see where we're analyzing more than once though.. –  Voo Nov 7 '11 at 20:00
    
Now you're not analyzing more than once, but I was afraid of use_result(analyze(data)) which was not used in your current code. –  gustavotkg Nov 7 '11 at 20:05
    
Where? I have only one call to analyze in there and the call sequence is equivalent to the given one: firstCheck, [analyze, secondCheck] if firstCheck true, [use_result] if secondCheck true. Ok we have to use a function for the second code block if it's larger than one statement, but with an inline function that's no loss. –  Voo Nov 7 '11 at 20:37
    
You can reduce the performance hit of exceptions either by making an exception subclass which prevents its stack-trace from being filled in, or by creating the exception object just once, caching it, and then repeatedly throwing the cached exception. In the case where you're using the exception just for flow control you don't care about the stack trace. –  Matthew Cline Nov 7 '11 at 20:52

You are not just using a goto. You are using a goto that goes into another scope. Much simpler:

if (firstCheck(data)) {
    result = analyze(data);
    use_result (secondCheck (result) ? result : DEFAULT_VALUE);
}
else {
    use_result(DEFAULT_VALUE);
}

Cleaner, no code duplication, and scalable:

int result = DEFAULT_VALUE;
if (firstCheck(data)) {
    int tmpResult = analyze(data);
    if (secondCheck (tmpResult))
        result = tmpResult;
}
use_result (result);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.