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In my program using java nio, the socketchannel.write() becomes very slow when it tries to write 10 KB messages consecutively. The measured time for writing a complete 10 KB message is between 160 ms and 200 ms. But the time for writing a complete 5 KB message is only takes 0.8 ms.

In the selector, I only have Selection.OP_READ and do not handle Selection.OP_WRITE. When a large complete message is received, it is written to another receiver 4 times.

Is anyone accounter same problem? There is a post about socketchannel.write() slow. My question is how to alternate change between OP_READ and OP_WRITE?

If I add an inerval e.g, 150 ms, the response time is reduced. Is there any way to find when the buffer is full so I can let the program waits. My operating system is windows xp.

Thanks.

I follow EPJ suggestion by checking the number of written bytes. But the response time is still high. I post part of my code here and would like to examine whether there is wrong with my code.

// this is the writeData() part using nio:

      while (buffer.hasRemaining()) {   
        try {           
                buffer.flip();                  
                n = socket.write(buffer);           
                if(n == 0) {                
                    key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_WRITE);
                    key.attach(buffer);             
                    break;
                }                               
        } catch (IOException e) {               
            e.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            buffer.compact();
        }
    }   

    if(buffer.position()==0) {                  
        key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_READ);
    }
share|improve this question
    
I guess it is trying permanently to send one single TCP packet of 10KB, which fails a lot. –  Martijn Courteaux Nov 7 '11 at 20:33
    
The messages are published consecutively. The topology is a chain of nodes. The message interval is 100 ms –  susan Nov 7 '11 at 21:07
    
@MartijnCourteaux No. TCP packetization happens at a lower level. It won't try to send an IP packet > the path MTU. –  EJP Nov 8 '11 at 0:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If write takes more than 20 micro-seconds, I would suggest you have a buffer full issue. I assume you are using blocking NIO. When the send buffer is not full it usually takes between 5 - 20 micro-seconds. In the past I have configured my server to kill any slow consumer which takes 2 ms to write. (Possibly a bit aggressive. ;)

You could try increasing the size of the send buffer (Socket.setSendBufferSize(int), which is also available for SocketChannels), but it would appear you are trying to send more data than your bandwidth allows.

10 KB is not a large message, the typical send buffer size is 64 KB, so for it to be full you would need to have 6-7 messages unsent. This might explain way 5KB is relatively fast.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. But I am using Java non-blocking socket. When a server receive a message, it forwards it to the next hop 4 times. I do not change the selection key to OP_WRITE. When I write the selection key is OP_READ. I guess my problem is tcp buffer full. If my guess is right, how to fix this problem? Will it be helpful to shutdown the socketchannel? –  susan Nov 7 '11 at 21:53
    
It would be helpful to determine why you don't have enough bandwidth or a slow consumer and fix it. If you have no control over either, closing the socket is a last resort. BTW: If you are using non-blocking, it shouldn't block on write, it should just fail to write any data !? –  Peter Lawrey Nov 7 '11 at 21:57

I suggest that your reading process is slow and that this is causing its receive buffer to back up, which is causing your send buffer to back up, which stalls your sends.

Or else you haven't written the code correctly for non-blocking mode. If you get a zero result from the write() method, you must (a) change the interestOps to OP_WRITE and (b) return to your select loop. When you get OP_WRITE you must then repeat the write; if you wrote all the data, change the interestOps back to OP_READ, otherwise leave everything as is and wait for the next OP_WRITE. If you attempt to loop while writing in non-blocking mode even in the presence of zero-length writes you will just spin, wasting CPU cycles and time.

Modulo bugs:

while (buffer.position() > 0)
{
  try
  {
    buffer.flip();
    int count = ch.write(buffer);
    if (count == 0)
    {
      key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_WRITE);
      break;
    }
  }
  finally
  {
    buffer.compact();
  }
}
if (buffer.position() == 0)
{
  key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_READ);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@susan You are doing a whole new registration. I said to change the interestOps to OP_WRITE, and I also said to change them back to OP_READ when you get a successful write. You aren't doing that. Another problem is that you should always compact() after flip() and write() regardless of the write status, otherwise the buffer is left in an invalid state. Another is that write() never returns < 0: see the Javadoc. –  EJP Nov 8 '11 at 22:54
    
If there is some sample code, it will be very helpful. Is it helpful to change the windows system tcp buffer ? –  susan Nov 8 '11 at 23:02
    
@susan See above. The Windows socket send and receive buffers are notoriously much too small at 8k and it is always helpful to bump them to 32k or 48k. However I believe you have a coding problem, which it won't address. –  EJP Nov 8 '11 at 23:27
    
Thank you. I appreciate your help. I am stuck here for a while so I become very worried. Do u know how to increase windows socket buffer size? I will continue fix my coding problem. Adding an interval between messages is a solution, however, it may not be a good solution. –  susan Nov 8 '11 at 23:54
    
SocketChannel.socket().setSend/ReceiveBufferSize(). Don't sleep between messages: that is literally a waste of time. TCP will handle the flow control correctly, but if you're using non-blocking I/O you do have to program the OP_READs and OP_WRITEs correctly. –  EJP Nov 9 '11 at 1:04

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