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I have a simple question that I am having trouble trying to find an answer for. I want to create a string that after 50 characters will replace everything after it with three dots? So as a quick example:

(The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog) would become something like: (The quick brown fox jumped over the la...)

If someone could give me a quick answer or point me to an answered question that would be much appreciated?

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2  
Have you tried the simplest approach of using Substring to get the first 50 characters? What pitfalls did you run into, such as inputs not of the appropriate length, perhaps unfortunate breaking inside words or after punctuation, etc? –  Anthony Pegram Nov 7 '11 at 20:53
    
see similar questions on SO: stackoverflow.com/search?q=truncate+c%23+string and on the web: bing.com/search?setmkt=en-US&q=truncate+a+c%23+string –  Mark Nov 7 '11 at 20:54
1  
did you try something as google? it's very hard to believe, you can't find something such simple... –  sasjaq Nov 7 '11 at 20:56
    
Well i'm a programming student and i'm just starting out, i had a look online but i guess i was searching the wrong thing? –  Aaron Nov 7 '11 at 21:12
    
possible duplicate of minimize length of string in C# –  Mike Samuel Nov 8 '11 at 0:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted
if (text.Length > 50) 
    text = text.Substring(0,50) + "...";
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Thanks you very much this works perfectly –  Aaron Nov 7 '11 at 21:10

Try the following code:

string mystring;
myString = (orig_string.Length > 50) ? orig_string.SubString(0, 50) + "..." : orig_string;
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string shortened = s.Length > 50 ? s.Substring(0, 50) + "..." : s;

Might need a bit of tweaking since this one would also replace a single character by the ellipsis which, if you do it for display length purposes is probably not adequate.

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Curses. You saved time by using single character variables. –  Joel Etherton Nov 7 '11 at 20:53
    
Psh, I also rewrote the code to use a conditional expression instead of an if statement :-P –  Joey Nov 7 '11 at 20:54
2  
Is it allowed in C# to use reserved keywords as variable names? –  Uwe Keim Nov 7 '11 at 20:54
1  
maybe you can write @short... short is reserved –  sasjaq Nov 7 '11 at 20:58
1  
sorry uwe, I'm blind :( –  sasjaq Nov 7 '11 at 20:59

It also might be nice to implement this as an extension method. Like this:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string Truncate(this String str, int length)
    {
        return str.Substring(0, length) + "...";
    }
}   
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1  
+1 I've also become an extension method addict. –  Joel Etherton Nov 7 '11 at 21:02

Use substring: (yourstringvariable.Length > 50 ? yourstringvariable.Substring(0, 50) + "..." : yourstringvariable);

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My assumption here is that you want at most maxLength characters.

if(string.Length >= maxLength)  
{   
    string newString = string.Substring(0, maxLength - 3);  
    newString += "...";  
}   
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That would leave 47 characters instead. He just wants three dots after 50 characters, unless of course maxLength == 53. :) –  drwelden Nov 7 '11 at 20:53
    
string.length() What C# dialect are you using? ;-) –  Uwe Keim Nov 7 '11 at 20:53
1  
@UweKeim java sharp =p –  Woot4Moo Nov 7 '11 at 20:54
    
@drw there is a note at the top of my answer about maxLength. –  Woot4Moo Nov 7 '11 at 20:55

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