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Let's say one creates a priority property as a string, using the constraint:

priority(inList:['Critical', 'Major', 'Normal', 'Enhancement'])

An alternative might be using an enum this way:

enum Priority { CRITICAL, MAJOR, NORMAL, ENHANCEMENT }  or
enum Priority { CRITICAL('Critical'), MAJOR('Major'), NORMAL('Normal'), ENHANCEMENT('Enhancement')

Priority priority
    ...

and possibly the following, depending on how enum is defined above:

static mapping = { priority enumType:"ordinal"} 

My question is, will adding future enum values work perfectly well with the database, as long as they are added at the end? Also, if I do wish to change what an enum value is interpreted as, is the best way to do this, for example, as:

 ... NORMAL('Minor')

or will things work well, if I simply change the 3rd item in the list however I want, e.g.

    MINOR or  MINOR('Minor')
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It shouldn't matter the order in which they appear. Internally, Grails will just do a valueOf lookup given the string representation. Now, changing the name of one will cause problems if you don't update the database appropriately. If you know this is going to happen, when in production, you might reconsider enums and go with a type table for reference. That way, you're just using the ID so it doesn't matter what the string value is.

I tend to use some sort of combination of the 2. Enums for hard and fast constants that I know are generally going to stay steady in production. But type tables for instances where users need to be able to add/modify/delete various values or if I know that I'm going to have a data warehouse of some sort, type tables are better / quicker due to foreign keys, with your run of the mill storage systems (MySQL, Postgres, etc).

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Super explanation, thank you –  Ray Nov 7 '11 at 23:30
    
Follow up question: what if I use the "ordinal" mapping mechanism? Does this give me some good "management" capabilities in your mind? –  Ray Nov 7 '11 at 23:33

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