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all I am new here. I am also new on C++ So here is the class and function i wrote.But i got the compiler error My class:

class fooPlayer
{
public:
       void fooPlayerfunc(){}//doing something here
       char askYesNo(std::string question);
};

class fooPlayerFactory
{
public:
   virtual std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer> MakePlayerX() const;
   virtual std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer> MakePlayerO() const;
private:
   std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer> MakePlayer(char letter) const;
   std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer> my_player;

};

Implement my class:

auto_ptr<fooPlayer> fooPlayerFactory:: MakePlayer(char letter) const
{
       my_player->fooPlayerfunc();
       return my_player;
}

auto_ptr<fooPlayer> fooPlayerFactory::MakePlayerX() const
{
      char go_first = my_player->askYesNo("Do you require the first move?");
      MakePlayer(go_first);
      return my_player;
}

auto_ptr<fooPlayer> fooPlayerFactory::MakePlayerO() const
{
    return my_player;
}

My main() function here:

int main()
{
    	  fooPlayerFactory factory;
    	  factory.MakePlayerX();
    	  factory.MakePlayerO();
}

I got the error: error C2558: class 'std::auto_ptr<_Ty>' : no copy constructor available or copy constructor is declared 'explicit'

I do not know how to change it even after reading the document on this link:

share|improve this question

The reason for the error is that you are calling the copy constructor of auto_ptr my_player in fooPlayerFactory::MakePlayerO() which is a const method. That means that is cannot modify its members.

However the copy constructor of auto_ptr DOES modify the right hand side so returning my_player trys to change its pointer to 0 (NULL), while assigning the original pointer to the auto_ptr in the return value.

The signature of the copy constuctor is

auto_ptr<T>::auto_ptr<T>(auto_ptr<T> & rhs)

not

auto_ptr<T>::auto_ptr<T>(const auto_ptr<T> & rhs)

The copy constructor of auto_ptr assigns ownership of the pointer to the left hand side, the right hand side then holds nothing.

I don't think you want to use auto_ptr here, you probably want boost::smart_ptr

It looks like you have mixed up two uses for auto_ptr

The first is as poor man's boost::scoped_ptr. This is to manage a single instance of a pointer in a class, the class manages the life time of the pointer. In this case you don't normally return this pointer outside your class (you can it is legal, but boost::smart_ptr / boost::weak_ptr would be better so clients can participate the life time of the pointer)

The second is its main purpose which is to return a newly created pointer to the caller of a function in an exception safe way.

eg

auto_ptr<T> foo() {
    return new T;
}

void bar() {
    auto_ptr<T> t = foo();
}

As I said I think you have mixed these two uses auto_ptr is a subtle beast you should read the auto_ptr docs carefully. It is also covered very well in Effective STL by Scott Meyers.

share|improve this answer

In your code:

auto_ptr<fooPlayer> fooPlayerFactory:: MakePlayer(char letter) const
{
       my_player->fooPlayerfunc();
       return my_player;
}

This is a const function, but fooPlayerfunc is not const - my compiler reports this error rather than the one you say you are getting. Are you posting the real code?

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was going to say. – Ray Hidayat Apr 29 '09 at 22:30
    
He didn't say exactly where the error he got was but I expect it was on the return statement of each function which calls the copy constructor. However your answer hilighted it to me +1 – iain Apr 30 '09 at 0:20

I don't think you actually want to constructing dynamic objects here.
A factory object creates and returns an object it normally does not keep a reference to it after creation (unless you are sharing it), and I don't actually see anywhere that you are creating the player.

If you only ever create one player internally in your (fooPlayerFactory). Then create an object and return references to it.

share|improve this answer

Edit: in response to the comment (which is correct, my bad), I left only the advice part.

Best practice is to have the factory methods just return a plain old pointer to the underlying object, and let the caller decide how to manage ownership (auto_ptr, scoped_ptr, or whatever).

share|improve this answer
    
Agree, my bad. Removed the wrong part from my answer. – thesamet Apr 29 '09 at 21:21
    
Absolutely Disagree. You should never be passing RAW pointers around There is just too much chance they will be dropped. If you are not sure return a std::auto_ptr<>. A shared_ptr<> has a constructor that accepts an auto_ptr<> and takes ownership from the returned auto_prt<> – Loki Astari Apr 29 '09 at 22:26
    
@martin - I for one disagree with you - I would rather the policy of dynamic memory management be decided by the user of the factory. – anon Apr 29 '09 at 22:43
    
I am with Martin on this. You must use auto_ptr or similar to preserve exception safety. However the use of auto_ptr in the case above looks bogus. – iain Apr 29 '09 at 23:52

Also your code is buggy, any class that implements virtual methods should have a virtual destructor.

share|improve this answer

I'm not seeing anywhere you construct my_player, so I have a feeling that some of the code is missing. Specifically, I think your constructor has this line:

my_player = new fooPlayer()

A fooPlayer object is not quite the same thing as an auto_ptr<fooPlayer> object, and auto_ptr is intentionally designed to prevent assigning from one to the other because, frankly, the alternative is worse. For the details, look up (1) conversion constructors, (2) the explicit keyword, and (3) copy constructors and destructive copy semantics.

You should change the constructor to either:

class fooPlayerFactory {
    public:
    fooPlayerFactory()
    {
        my_player = std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer>(new fooPlayer());
    }

Or (using a member initializer list):

class fooPlayerFactory {
    public:
    fooPlayerFactory() : my_player(std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer>(new fooPlayer()) { }

The solution isn't pretty but, like I said, the alternative is worse due to some really arcane details.


As a bit of advice, though, you're making life harder than it needs to be; and may in fact be causing strange bugs. auto_ptr exists to manage the lifetime of an object, but the only reason you need to worry about the lifetime of my_player is that you've allocated it with new. But there's no need to call new, and in fact there's no need to keep my_player. And unless fooPlayerFactory is meant to be the base class for some other factory, there's no need to mark functions virtual.

Originally I thought you could get away with simply returning copies of the my_player object, but there's a problem: before returning my_player from MakePlayer() you call a method on it, and I assume that method changes the internal state of my_player. Further calls to MakePlayer() will change the state again, and I think you're going to eventually have my_player in the wrong state. Instead, return a different fooPlayer object with each request. Don't do memory management, just promise to construct the object. That way the user can decide on memory allocation:

fooPlayerFaclotry factory;
fooPlayer on_stack = factory.MakePlayerX();
fooPlayer* on_heap_raw_pointer = new fooPlayer(factory.MakePlayerO());
std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer> on_heap_managed_scope
                         = std::auto_ptr<fooPlayer>(factory.MakePlayerX());

I would change fooPlayerFactory to look like this:

class fooPlayerFactory
{
private:
   fooPlayer MakePlayer(const char letter) const
   {
       fooPlayer result;
       result.fooPlayerfunc();
       return result;
   }

public:
   fooPlayer* MakePlayerX() const
   {
       char go_first = askYesNo("Do you require the first move?");
       return MakePlayer(go_first);
   }

   fooPlayer MakePlayerO() const
   {
       return fooPlayer();
   }
};
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