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I am trying to obscure the index positions on an edi file... I had a situation where 2 or 3 things could be at an index based on the situation. It'd be cool to use an enum to hide the "magic numbers" and was suprised to see that you could assign multiple enums to the same value like this:

public enum Color
{
    Red = 1,
    Blue = 1,
    Green = 1
}

and the compiler is happy with this. I didn't expect this to work. I don't need to cast back to the enum so I'm not worried about trying to go back, but this smells funky. Why does the CLR allow multiple values for enums and should I use a struct for this? (A struct seemed heavier duty than an enum and this seems to work)

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2  
This is invariably best answered with the opposite question: why would it not allow this? It is handy when you, say, include a First and Last enum member. –  Hans Passant Nov 7 '11 at 21:47
1  
how to you want to use "struct for this"? –  wiero Nov 7 '11 at 21:49
    
I could use a struct to get the enum "look" and I wouldn't have to cast. something like "public static int Red { get{ return 1; }}" –  Rikon Nov 7 '11 at 21:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Actually your'e already defining a struct... Behind the scenes an enum is just a struct (but which derives from System.Enum) and the values of the enum are defined as constants (you can verify this with ILDASM).

Your enum definition translates into the following pseudo C# code:

public struct Color : System.Enum
{
    public const int Red = 1;
    public const int Blue = 1;
    public const int Green = 1;
}

The above code won't compile in C# because the compiler doesn't allow defining a struct with an explicit base class, but that's what it emits for an enum definition.

Since there is no problem with a type that contains an multiple constants that have the same value, there is no problem with the enum definition.

But since the enum does not have unique values you might have an issue when converting into this enum. For example the following two line of codes will return the enum value Red, because the first value is arbitrarily selected.

Color color1 = (Color)1;
Color color2 = (Color)Enum.Parse(typeof(Color), "1");

Strictly speaking the enum value is not Red, it is 1, but when you print out the value you'll see Red.

Also, the following boolean is true which looks a bit weird...

// true (Red is Green??)
bool b = Color.Red == Color.Green;

At the bottom line this is perfectly legal, but it's up to you to use it when it makes sense...

Here is a direct link to the section of my .NET tutorial that discusses enumerations under the hood: http://motti.me/c1E

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1  
+ 1 for the win: I appreciated the detail and CLR insite! thanks! –  Rikon Nov 8 '11 at 0:44
    
Also see: stackoverflow.com/questions/1425777/… –  LosManos Oct 30 '12 at 14:44
4  
Some of us are red-green colorblind, so the last line of code there makes perfect sense ;-) –  rmayer06 Mar 17 '13 at 6:37
    
@rmayer06 made my laugh loudly :D (I'm red-green colorblind) –  Abbas Dec 20 '13 at 9:29

That's perfectly legal C#. From the C# Language specification version 4.0, section 14.3:

Multiple enum members may share the same associated value. The example

enum Color 
{
   Red,
   Green,
   Blue,
   Max = Blue
}

shows an enum in which two enum members—Blue and Max—have the same associated value.

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The same numeric value but different name is nothing else as an alias. It could be e.g.

public enum Color
{
   DefaultColor = 1,
   Red = 1,
   Blue = 2
}

It can make sense in some cases but not many. When you parse the values back and call colorValue.ToString() you will get the last value as stringified value back (Red in this case) but you will loose the conept of default colors since it is the same thing. At least in the way you did model your data. If you want to keep it separate use different values for different things.

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This is a good "why" example: because you want to enumerate the values, but also name a default (or a min/max). –  Jim Mischel Nov 7 '11 at 21:58

If you think of each enum value as a constant, it makes sense. There's no reason why you shouldn't be able to have two constants with the same value:

public enum MyColor 
{ 
    Blue = 2,         
    Yellow = 3,
    Green = 4
    BlueAndYellow = 4,        
} 

Is the same as:

public enum MyColor 
{ 
    Blue = 2,         
    Yellow = 3,
    Green = 4,
    BlueAndYellow = Green,        
} 

Essentially you just have the same constant with two different names. BlueAndYellow is an alias for Green.

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