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I'm in the process of creating a Backbone.js app using Require.js. Each view file corresponds to one resource (e.g. 'News'). Within each view file, I declare a backbone view for each action ('index', 'new', etc). At the bottom of the view file I receive the necessary info from the router and then decide which view to instantiate (based on the info passed in from the router).

This all works well, but it requires lots of code and doesn't seem to be the 'backbone.js way'. For one thing, I'm rellying on the url to manage state. For another, I'm not using _.bind which pops up in a lot of backbone.js examples. In other words, I don't think I'm doing it right, and my code base smells... Any thoughts on how to structure my app better?

router.js

define([
  'jquery',
  'underscore',
  'backbone',
  'views/news'], 
  function($, _, Backbone,  newsView){
    var AppRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
        routes:{
            'news':'news',
            'news/:action':'news',
            'news/:action/:id':'news'
        },

        news: function(action, id){
            newsView(this, action, id).render();
        }
    });


    var intialize = function(){
        new AppRouter;
        Backbone.history.start()
    };

    return{
        initialize: initialize;
    };
}

news.js ('views/news')

define([
  'jquery',
  'underscore',
  'backbone',
  'collections/news',
  'text!templates/news/index.html',
  'text!templates/news/form.html'

  ], function($, _, Backbone, newsCollection, newsIndexTemplate, newsFormTemplate){

    var indexNewsView = Backbone.View.extend({
        el: $("#content"),

        initialize: function(router){
            ...
        },

        render: function(){
            ...
        }
    });

    var newNewsView = Backbone.View.extend({
        el: $("#modal"),

        render: function(){
            ...
        }
    });

    ...

    /*
     *  SUB ROUTER ACTIONS
     */

    var defaultAction = function(router){
      return new newsIndexView(router);
    }

    var subRouter = {
      undefined: function(router){return defaultAction(router);},

      'index': function(router){ return defaultAction(router);},

      'new': function(){
        return new newNewsView()
      },

      'create': function(router){
        unsavedModel = {
          title : $(".modal-body form input[name=title]").val(),
          body  : $(".modal-body form textarea").val()
        };
        return new createNewsView(router, unsavedModel);
      },

      'edit': function(router, id){
        return new editNewsView(router, id);
      },

      'update': function(router, id){
        unsavedModel = {
          title : $(".modal-body form input[name=title]").val(),
          body  : $(".modal-body form textarea").val()
        };

        return new updateNewsView(router, id, unsavedModel);
      },
    }

    return function(router, action, id){
      var re = /^(index)$|^(edit)$|^(update)$|^(new)$|^(create)$/
      if(action != undefined && !re.test(action)){
        router.navigate('/news',true);
      }
      return subRouter[action](router, id);
    }


  });
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

While I feel like it's important to emphasize that there isn't really a "Backbone.js way", it does seem like you're replicating work Backbone should be doing for you.

I agree that it makes sense to have a specialized Router for each independent section of your application. But it looks at first glance like what you're doing in your "sub-router" section is just recreating the Backbone.Router functionality. Your AppRouter doesn't need to deal with /news URLs at all; you can just initialize a NewsRouter with news-specific routes, and it will deal with news-related URLs:

var NewsRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
    routes:{
        'news':             'index',
        'news/create':      'create',
        'news/update/:id':  'update',
        'news/edit/:id':    'edit'
    },

    index: function() { ... },

    create: function() { ... },

    // etc
});

As long as this is initialized before you call Backbone.history.start(), it will capture URL requests for its routes, and you never have to deal with the AppRouter. You also don't need to deal with the ugly bit of code at the bottom of your view - that's basically just doing what the core Backbone.Router does for you.

share|improve this answer
    
What if you want your application to be more modular and for each module you dont want them to have to know about other modules? For small apps having everything in one router works but as things grow having modules being able to resolve their own routes helps a lot! Not saying that implementation above is perfect, just that it can (and for us is) useful. Shame that you can't modify the router after Backbone.history.start() :) –  Tom Tu Nov 8 '11 at 8:22
1  
you can add routes dynamically using router.route: http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/#Router-route –  timDunham Nov 8 '11 at 14:50
    
@nrabinowitz in your opinion is better to have one route for each action OR have one route for a resource, and use events to handle actions? –  LDK Nov 8 '11 at 16:39
1  
@LDK - it depends on your app. Usually I'd have one route per action if each action required a different view, e.g. /resource/edit needs an editor view. The main questions are, do you want users to be able to bookmark or use their back button with the route? –  nrabinowitz Nov 8 '11 at 16:54
    
@nrabinowitz excellent point re: routes and bookmarking. What about modal views? Most of the view stays the same, except a modal appears. I suppose it depends if I want the user to see the previous view in the background or not. –  LDK Nov 8 '11 at 17:12
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I'm using require.js and backbone as well I think the main difference that i'd suggest is that each file should return just one view, model, router or collection.

so my main html page requires my main router. That router is a module that requires a few views based on each of it's routes, and a bootstrapped model. Each router method passes the relevant bootstrapped model piece to the relevant view.

From there it stays really clean as long as each file is just 1 backbone thing (model, collection, view, router) and requires just the elements it uses. This makes for a lot of js files (I have about 100 for my current project) but that's where require.js optimization comes into play.

I hope that helps.

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Over all I like the approach, but my worry is that you have to pass in many modules via require.js. For instance, wouldn't the router module require many many view modules? –  LDK Nov 8 '11 at 16:23
    
possibly, but if you start getting 5,6,7 routes in one router, you should start considering splitting them up. so you would have a main.js that would require router1, router2, router3, create all 3 of them and start history. Then you've just split things up logically again. –  timDunham Nov 8 '11 at 19:44
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Why don't you structure your routes like this:

        routes:{
            'news':'news',
            'news/edit/:id':'editNews',
            'news/new':'newNews',
            ...
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Doing that would create many many functions. If an app had 4 resources, and each resource had 7 actions, that's 28 functions that need to be defined in the route file. I'm also not keen on having to retype all that for every resource. –  LDK Nov 8 '11 at 0:22
    
Than write a function that takes a number of resources and returns the routes for each resource. Besides, the functions have to be written anyway, it's even in the example code. It's just moved it into a subrouter with added more boilerplate. btw, I agree with @nrabinowitz on the multiple routers. –  Chris Biscardi Nov 8 '11 at 1:01
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