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LINQ's AsParallel returns ParallelQuery. I wonder if it's possible to change this behavior so that I could compare the LINQ statement run with and without parallelism without actually changing the code? This behavior should be similar to Debug.Assert - when DEBUG preprocessor directive is not set, it's optimized out. So I'd like to be able to make AsParallel return the same type without converting it to ParallelQuery.

I suppose I can declare my own extension method (because I can't override AsParallel) and have that preprocessor directive analyzed within it:

    public static class MyExtensions
    {
#if TURN_OFF_LINQ_PARALLELISM
        public static IEnumerable<T> AsControllableParallel<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
        {
            return enumerable;
        }
#else
        public static ParallelQuery<T> AsControllableParallel<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
        {
            return enumerable.AsParallel();
        }
#endif
    }

I wonder if there is any other way. Am I asking for too much?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What about

            var result = 
                source
#if TURN_ON_LINQ_PARALLELISM
                .AsParallel()
#endif
                .Select(value => value.StartsWith("abcd"));
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good point. It will clutter the code a little bit but I'd say it's as simple as it gets :) –  Schultz9999 Nov 7 '11 at 22:47

You can create your own extension methods and forward these to the "real" AsParallel method in release builds and use the sequential ones in debug builds. Extension methods are resolved by checking for method in the current namespace and then are the "outer" namespaces searched (instance methods are still preferred).

   class NonParallelQuery 
    {
        IEnumerable _data;
        public NonParallelQuery(IEnumerable data)
        {
            _data = data;

        }
        public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
        {
            return _data.GetEnumerator();
        }
    }

    static class Extensions
    {
        public static NonParallelQuery AsParallel(this IEnumerable source)
        {
#if DEBUG
            return new NonParallelQuery(ParallelEnumerable.AsParallel(source));
#else
            return new NonParallelQuery(source);
#endif
        }
    }


    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {

        public Form1()
        {
            var data = new string[] { "first", "second" };
            foreach (var str in data.Select(x => x.ToString()).AsParallel())
            {
                Debug.Print("Value {0}", str);
            }
            InitializeComponent();
        }
share|improve this answer
    
The extension method in my post is no good? –  Schultz9999 Nov 7 '11 at 22:33
    
Ups. To use other more complicated means you could use an IL rewriter like Postsharp to intercept the calls and replace it with something different for your debug builds for example. –  Alois Kraus Nov 8 '11 at 16:57

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