Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to implement a binary search tree using C++ for one of assignments. I've created the class, and attempted to implement the InsertItem, PrintTree, DeleteTree methods for the class, I think I did everything right but for some reason my program keeps crashing :(

Here's my code:

PrintTree Method

template <class TItem>
void BinarySearchTree<TItem>::PrintTree()
{
    PrintTree(RootNode);
}

template <class TItem>
void BinarySearchTree<TItem>::PrintTree(BinarySearchTreeNode* Node)
{
    if(Node == NULL)
        return;

    cout << Node->Data << endl;
    PrintTree(Node->LeftChild);
    PrintTree(Node->RightChild);
}

DeleteTree Method

template <class TItem>
void BinarySearchTree<TItem>::DeleteTree()
{
    DeleteTree(RootNode);
}

template <class TItem>
void BinarySearchTree<TItem>::DeleteTree(BinarySearchTreeNode* Node)
{
    if(Node == NULL)
        return;

    DeleteTree(Node->LeftChild);
    DeleteTree(Node->RightChild);

    delete Node;
}

My sequence of method calls up until the program crashes:

I insert items F,B,G,A,D,I,C,E,H: works fine

I call PrintTree(): works fine

I call DeleteTree(): works fine

I call PrintTree() again: program crashes

For some reason the expression if(RootNode == NULL) is not returning true after the DeleteTree() method is called, so the program tries to print something that doesn't exist and crashes. I'm not sure why this is happening, what am I doing wrong here?

Any and all help is appreciated. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
2  
this seems to be a dangling pointer : calling delete p ; on a pointer does not set it to 0. So in the end the memory pointed by RootNode is freed by the last call to delete Node ;. You should add RootNode = 0 ; in the end of ::DeleteTree() –  totem Nov 7 '11 at 22:20
    
Hey, this worked. Thanks! –  Saad Imran. Nov 7 '11 at 22:22
    
@totem - this solves the problem for the DeleteTree() method, but not if you pass in a specific node that isn't RootNode to DeleteTree(*Node) –  Brian Roach Nov 7 '11 at 22:26
    
@BrianRoach indeed, the best change (although not clean imo) with the provided code would be to pass the pointer as a Node**. But it's ugly –  totem Nov 7 '11 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Calling "delete" does not null out the pointer. You will want to do:

delete Node; 
Node = nullptr;

EDIT:

Pass the pointer by address so that you can clean up dangling pointers as you go:

void BinarySearchTree<TItem>::DeleteTree(BinarySearchTreeNode *&node);
share|improve this answer
1  
Or Node = NULL; if you don't have C++11. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 7 '11 at 22:21
    
No, you don't, since that wouldn't do anything outside the method ;) (That would require a pointer to a pointer) –  Brian Roach Nov 7 '11 at 22:21
    
@SethCarnegie Ah yes, good point. I am pretty sure the common compilers support this as of the C++0x working draft. Either way, to be consistent with your other code NULL would probably be better. –  Mranz Nov 7 '11 at 22:22
2  
@Nasgul You should also take the pointer by reference, so the function should accept a BinarySearchTreeNode*& Node. This way it will change the pointer in the tree, not just the local variable. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 7 '11 at 22:23
2  
@SaadImran. Like I said, you have to take the pointer by reference, so the function should accept a BinarySearchTreeNode*& Node. This way it will change the pointer in the tree, not just the local variable when you do Node = NULL; –  Seth Carnegie Nov 7 '11 at 22:26

I think the delete function should be changed to the following,

template <class TItem>
void BinarySearchTree<TItem>::DeleteTree(BinarySearchTreeNode** Node)
{
    if((*Node) == NULL)
        return;

    DeleteTree(&(*Node)->LeftChild);
    DeleteTree(&(*Node)->RightChild);

    delete (*Node);
    (*Node) = NULL;
}

Please correct me if I am wrong.

share|improve this answer
1  
This works, so I will upvote, but I will accept the other solution just because it's a little bit cleaner for my taste. Thanks though, appreciate the help. –  Saad Imran. Nov 7 '11 at 22:33
    
note that the pointer is still not nulled in initial answer –  totem Nov 7 '11 at 22:36
1  
This is still wrong because it doesn't set *Node to NULL, and also because (*Node)->LeftChild and ->RightChild aren't BinarySearchTreeNode**s (they're only BinarySearchTreeNode*s). You'll have to pass the address of RightChild and LeftChild. I think fixing those things should fix this though. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 7 '11 at 22:36
    
@SethCarnegie: edited. –  Ajai Nov 7 '11 at 23:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.