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I know that the template class definitions is like:

template <class TYPE>
class cars{
   public:
   TYPE myCar;
}

but somewhere I encountered to this piece of code:

template <class T>
class polynomialT {

    ...

}
************************************** 
class GFNUM2m {

...
}
**************************************
template class polynomialT<GFNUM2m>;

the last line is vague for me? any one knows what's up? is it an object of polynomialT class?(it seems not because it has no name) is it template?(it seems a duplicate because it has been templated once)

share|improve this question
template class polynomialT<GFNUM2m>;

Is a request to explicitly instantiate the template class polynomialT with GFNUM2m, including instantiating all its non-template functions.

Some cases when this is needed are:

  • When you want to avoid multiple template instantiation (that then get purged by the linker);
  • When you want to make sure that the full template can be instantiated even for those (non-template) functions not called;
  • When you want to provide template definitions within a .cpp file;
share|improve this answer
    
+1, and in what cases do you ever need to do that? – Seth Carnegie Nov 7 '11 at 22:29
    
@Seth Carnegie: When you want to avoid multiple template instantiation (that then get purged by the linker); when you want to make sure that the full template can be instantiated even for those functions not called; when you want to provide template definitions within a .cpp file; and probably some other cases... – K-ballo Nov 7 '11 at 22:32
    
This is potentially very useful, I'm surprised I never came across it before. – Mark Ransom Nov 7 '11 at 23:41

the last line is equivalent to:

class polynomialT {
  protected:
  GFNUM2m *coeff;                   // array of coefficients (? see below)
  int degree;
  ...

}

GFNUM2m *coeff is not an array, is simply a pointer to a GFNUM2m variable. Array and pointer are linked in some way, for example you can allocate dynamically an array with coeff = new GFNUM2m[10], but it is discouraged.

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2  
yes, but it's more like a forward declaration of a type that is used some lines after – azf Nov 7 '11 at 22:26
    
Dynamically allocating arrays isn't discouraged, it's absolutely necessary in some situations... Only discouraged when unnecessary. – Seth Carnegie Nov 7 '11 at 22:30

In fact, it is _explicit template instantiation. Use this to get the compiler to generate all (non-nested-template) members of the template class. This is convenient sometimes when linking externally to templated code, to prevent duplication of object code or missing externals (when methods get inlined).

Template specializations seem similar, but require template<> to announce the specialization of an already-declared template. Also, they would define an alternative class definition for that specific template parameter (as @rerun mentions).

Now, on the crosspoint of those, you could see

template<> class polynomialT<GFNUM2m>;

Which IS, in fact, a forward declared template specialization. This would serve to prevent the compiler from auto-instantiating the class template for that type parameter during the rest of the translation unit.

share|improve this answer
    
Template specializations have <...> after template. – K-ballo Nov 7 '11 at 23:21
    
@K-ballo: Hey I guess I worked out some useful extra information from that confusion. Thanks – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 23:25

The last line is a forward declaration of the polynomialT class template with a template parameter of GFNUM2m, which also instantiates the template class.

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@AnonymousDownVoter - Care to explain why the downvote? – Michael Price Nov 22 '11 at 17:15

it means template in the class polynomialT is now GFNUM2m class.

share|improve this answer
    
i beg your pardon? that is even vaguer to me. – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 22:28
    
I mean it's forward decleration for polynomialT's template data member. So we can create a polynomialT object which has a instance of GFNUM2m.. – Fatih Donmez Nov 7 '11 at 22:34
    
I'm sorry but that's just inaccurate. The whole idea of a forward declaration is to name an incomplete type. In this case, it rather instantiates a complete type (from the clas template). -1 – sehe Nov 7 '11 at 22:47

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