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I have a problem with the jQuery click event when an element is inside another element. The code I am using is similar to the following:

<div class="a" id="a">
  <a class="b" id="b"></a>
</div>

$(".a,.b").click(function() {
  var current_id = $(this).attr("id"); 
  alert(current_id);
  ...do something...
});  

When I click on the tag class="b" it returns the encapsulated class="a" id instead of the id of class="b". How do I code it so that when I click on class="a" or class="b" it returns the correct corresponding id value?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you have to stop it from bubbling.

$(".a,.b").click(function() {
  var current_id = $(this).attr("id"); 
  alert(current_id);
  // ...do something...
  return false; // <-- stop propagation
}); 

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Q9njP/

EDIT: better way

$(".a,.b").click(function(event) {
  var current_id = event.target.id; 
  alert(current_id);
  // ...do something...
  event.stopPropagation();
}); 

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/xMGgA/1/

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2  
You should better use event.stopPropagation(). –  Felix Kling Nov 7 '11 at 22:34
    
@FelixKling in the question he wasn't using the event parameter. I just gave a working example with the least amount of changes. You are definitively correct though. –  ilia choly Nov 7 '11 at 22:37
    
'return false;' worked. Thank you. @FelixKling how would event.stopPropagation() work? –  Kevin Nov 7 '11 at 23:13
1  
@Kevin: have a look at the second example in this answer... the difference is that return false also prevents the default action of the browser which is not necessarily desired. stopPropagation is more expressive as well. –  Felix Kling Nov 7 '11 at 23:21
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You need to use the event target. This is the element where the event originated:

$(".a").click(function(event) {
  var current_id = event.target.id;
  alert(current_id);
  ...do something...
});  

Note that this is the same as $(event.target).attr('id'), but cleaner and faster, and that I've removed the reference to .b since all events fired on .b will be matched on .a anyway.

See jsFiddle example.

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Wouldn't this fire twice? –  FloydThreepwood Nov 7 '11 at 22:31
    
@FloydThreepwood YES -> jsfiddle.net/manseuk/xxBUW –  ManseUK Nov 7 '11 at 22:32
    
@ManseUK That doesn't do anything because you haven't added event as a parameter. –  lonesomeday Nov 7 '11 at 22:34
    
@lonesomeday jsfiddle.net/manseuk/xxBUW/4 –  ManseUK Nov 7 '11 at 22:36
    
But yes, @FloydThreepwood, it would fire twice. The handler should only be on the parent element, although whether this is the correct solution would depend on the actual real-world situation. –  lonesomeday Nov 7 '11 at 22:37
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