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Java how to: Generic Array creation
Error generic array creation

I have been tasked with writing a Hash Table in Java, which must work with any data type. The rules on the code I am writing are as follows: - The hash table must have an array as the underlying data structures, of a size determined at the time the object is constructed - When a collision occurs, the element that collides should be placed into a linked list, which holds all of the elements at that index (key) in the hash table

Thus, for the underlying data type, I have made an array of type LinkedList (custom, not the Java API LinkedList).

private LinkedList<T>[] table;

The issue is, of course, instantiating this array. Here are some of my attempts:

public HashTable(int size) {
  table = new LinkedList<T>[size];
}

This throws a compile-time generic array creation error.

public HashTable(int size) {
  table = (LinkedList<T>[])(new Object[size]);
}

That causes a ClassCastException error at runtime (java.lang.Object cannot be cast to LinkedList).

The person heading the project is also unsure of how to deal with this issue. Is there any way I can change my code so that the hash table still has an array as its underlying data structure with the collisions being placed in a LinkedList?

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marked as duplicate by zengr, David Z, Paul Bellora, Dave Newton, Dori Nov 8 '11 at 3:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
See if stackoverflow.com/questions/3903196/… helps you –  David Z Nov 7 '11 at 23:52
1  
Another reason why whoever thought type erasure was a good way to implement generics should be shot. –  NullUserException Nov 8 '11 at 0:00
    
If this is homework, please mark it as such. –  Mike Samuel Nov 8 '11 at 0:12
    
@DavidZaslavsky, it seems that we've decided to use the solution proposed in the problem that you've posted a link to, using an ArrayList as the Collection. Thank you very much, and I need to work on my searching skills. –  Tanaki Nov 8 '11 at 0:33
    
I find it impossible to believe this isn't homework. –  Dave Newton Nov 8 '11 at 1:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This worked for me:

public class HashTable<T> {

    private LinkedList<T> table[];

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public HashTable(int size) {
        table = new LinkedList[size];
    }

}

For example:

HashTable<String> t = new HashTable<String>(10);
t.table[0] = new LinkedList<String>();
t.table[0].add("test");
System.out.println(t.table[0].get(0));

Yes, the constructor generated a warning (that explains the "unchecked" annotation), but afterwards the code works without more warnings.

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+1 for better answer. –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 8 '11 at 0:19

Just use Object[] as your data store, and manually cast it to the specific type. This is acceptable in building infrastructure stuff, where type relations can be harder than usual.

For what it's worth, this is the way to create generic array in Java:

@SafeVarargs
static <E> E[] newArray(int length, E... array)
{
    return Arrays.copyOf(array, length);
}

//used in your example

    private LinkedList<T>[] table;

    public HashTable(int size) {
        table = newArray(size);
    }
share|improve this answer

It isn't ideal, but you can do this sort of thing:

import java.util.LinkedList;

public class Test
{
    static class HashTable<T>
    {
        public HashTable(int size)
        {
            LinkedList<T>[] table = (LinkedList<T>[])java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(LinkedList.class, size);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        HashTable<Integer> table = new HashTable<Integer>(23);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Class -> Class<T> and don't trap and drop Exception e. And why not just pass LinkedList.class to newInstance? You don't need the forName lookup at all. –  Mike Samuel Nov 8 '11 at 0:13
    
@Mike: True enough. –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 8 '11 at 0:15
    
Array.newInstance(LinkedList.class, size) is exactly identical to new LinkedList[size] –  user102008 Nov 19 '11 at 8:15

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