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unsure how to go about describing this but here i go:

For some reason, when trying to create a release build version of my game to test, the enemy creation aspect of it isn't working.

Enemies *e_level1[3];
e_level1[0] = &Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -250, 32, 32, 0, 1);
e_level1[1] = &Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -325, 32, 32, 3, 1);
e_level1[2] = &Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -550, 32, 32, 1, 1);

Thats how i'm creating my enemies. Works fine when in the debug configuration but when i switch to the release config, it doesn't seem to initialize the enemies correctly.

To me, this seems a bit strange that it works in debug but not in release, any help appreciated on what mostly is what i've done wrong.

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That's really common. If Debug and Release were the same what would the point be :) But Debug is going to make things "safer", and easier to debug. Answer below has good suggestions. –  Joe McGrath Nov 8 '11 at 0:33
1  
MSDN has a whole article about it. –  Joe McGrath Nov 8 '11 at 0:39
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Other people have already pointed out the error, namely that the temporaries are getting destroyed straight away, but all of the answers so far are using manual memory management - it's more idiomatic in C++ to use e.g. std::vector for something like this, e.g.

std::vector<Enemies> enemies;
enemies.push_back(Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -250, 32, 32, 0, 1));
enemies.push_back(Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -325, 32, 32, 3, 1));
enemies.push_back(Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -550, 32, 32, 1, 1));

Then you just access the Enemies instances as enemies[0] through enemies[2] and they get cleaned up automatically when the vector goes out of scope.

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Thanks alot :), didn't think to use vectors. Even though i'm using them already to hold map data. –  Danran Nov 8 '11 at 17:28
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e_level1[0] = &Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -250, 32, 32, 0, 1);

doesn't do what you think it does. If it is the constructor call, it creates a temporary and its address is stored in e_level1[0]. When e_level1[1] is initialized e_level1[0] destructor is probably already called.

You probably want to do

Enemies* e_level1[3] = 
    {
        new Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -250, 32, 32, 0, 1) , 
        new Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -325, 32, 32, 3, 1) , 
        new Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -550, 32, 32, 1, 1)
    };
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3  
NO! Don't do that! If any of the news fail then you will leak memory. –  Mankarse Nov 8 '11 at 0:39
    
@Mankarse: Indeed, +1 –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 8 '11 at 0:42
    
I felt the op was new to C++, shared_ptr or vector might be too much !! –  parapura rajkumar Nov 8 '11 at 0:43
    
Technically speaking, you don't necessarily leak if any of the news fail - the first one can fail with no leak (you haven't allocated any memory beforehand, so there's nothing to leak). But that's wanton pedantry :) –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 8 '11 at 0:44
    
@parapura: For a newbie, using vector is significantly easier than getting your head round pointers IMHO, but I do see where you're coming from at least. –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 8 '11 at 0:46
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Most debug modes initialise all memory to zero for you. In normal execution it may be random.

Make your compiler as fussy as possible (you should have done this already) and fix all the warnings.

If it still persists, you should run it in a memory checking tool like valgrind.

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The code initializes the pointers to point to temporary objects that are immediately destroyed. Accessing temporaries that no longer exist through pointers or references is undefined behavior. You want:

Enemies *e_level1[3];
e_level1[0] = new Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -250, 32, 32, 0, 1);
e_level1[1] = new Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -325, 32, 32, 3, 1);
e_level1[2] = new Enemies(sdlLib, 500, 2, 3, 128, -550, 32, 32, 1, 1);
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You seem to be creating the Enemies object on the stack, which means that the moment they go out of scope, your e_level1 pointers are pointing to objects that have been destroyed. (proof: put a breakpoint in the Enenmies class destructor and seee when that gets hit) Therefore, when you try to de-reference them, you'll get garbage.

What you want is:

for( size_t i = 0; i < 3; i++ )
    e_level1[i] = new Enemies( sdlLib, ... );

That will create the object on the heap. It also means you will need to destroy the objects using:

for( size_t i = 0; i < 3; i++ )
    delete ( e_level + i );
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Your code corrects the problem, but your explanation is wrong. They were not just getting created on the Stack. –  Joe McGrath Nov 8 '11 at 0:46
    
Which part is wrong? –  C.. Nov 8 '11 at 0:48
    
Enemies myEnemy; *e_level1[0] = myEnemy would be creating on the stack and returning an invalid pointer. Your explanation is of the wrong problem, but has a correct solution. –  Joe McGrath Nov 8 '11 at 1:01
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