Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I created a tag on the master branch called v0.1 like this:

git tag -a v0.1

But then I realised there were still some changes I needed to merge into master for release 0.1, so I did that. But now my v0.1 tag is stuck on (to invoke the post-it note analogy) the wrong commit - I want it to be stuck on the most recent commit on master but instead it is stuck on the second most recent commit on master. How can I move it to the most recent commit on master?

share|improve this question
    
good to accept an answer if one worked for you –  Dave Amphlett Sep 19 '12 at 20:58
    
OK done. thanks. –  eedeep Sep 25 '12 at 2:03
    
Gave the 100th score. :-) –  Final Contest Jul 7 at 14:25
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 130 down vote accepted

Use the -f option to git tag:

-f
--force

    Replace an existing tag with the given name (instead of failing)

You probably want to use -f in conjunction with -a to force-create an annotated tag instead of a non-annotated one.

share|improve this answer
1  
Did you try specifying both the -a and -f options? That would replace an existing annotated tag with another annotated tag, which is what you want. –  Greg Hewgill Nov 8 '11 at 1:22
27  
It may be a good idea to delete the tag on any remote before you push too, by doing this: git push origin :refs/tag/<tagname> and then do git tag -fa <tagname> and then git push origin master --tags. Otherwise you might end up with strange stuff in the refs list on the remote with ^ and {} characters being appended. Thanks to Dan at codebasehq.com for pointing this out. –  eedeep Dec 13 '11 at 5:07
12  
@eedeep: Minor correction - instead of :refs/tag/<tagname> it should be :refs/tags/<tagname>. –  Ben Hocking Nov 1 '12 at 20:57
3  
This only works if you haven't pushed the code off your machine. If you have, the best answer is 'there's plenty of numbers in the world' as it's probably not worth the hassle. –  Chris Huang-Leaver Feb 25 '13 at 13:27
2  
If you had already pushed your tag you can still update the remote tag with a forced push git push -f origin <tagname> –  rc_luke Oct 16 '13 at 21:33
show 3 more comments

Delete it with git tag -d <tagname> and then recreate it on the correct commit.

share|improve this answer
    
The first response was the one I used and it worked well but this is good to know too. Thanks both responders. –  eedeep Nov 8 '11 at 0:58
1  
@eedeep: I think Greg's response is actually better here to be fair. –  Stuart Golodetz Nov 8 '11 at 1:03
2  
ha! Back to basics. This is a good solution as well –  Mark May 30 at 3:19
add comment

More precisely, you have to force the addition of the tag, then push with option --tags and -f:

git tag -f -a <tagname>
git push -f --tags
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.