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Could anyone give me very general idea of how elements like air conditioning controllers so the parts where in a car you setting up temperature, with led displays etc are programmed nowadays? So assuming we have a plastic panel with buttons on it, led display and what not, and when I press "+" I want temperature to be increased or some mechanical parts to take action.

  1. I'm guessing that there is ROM and some CPU chips where software controlling the parts is stored. Now this software is usually written in Java or low level C(++?) or even lower?

  2. Are there any libraries commonly used for this sort of thing? Or the chips come preprogrammed with these and maybe some basic operating systems?

  3. how that chip is programmed with software? There is some sort of ROM writing device needed is that right?

  4. is this something that would be able to play around at home via my laptop and if so what equipment I would need in addition to laptop?

Would anyone be able to point me to resources where I could read more on it? I'm trying to get general idea of how it works, how involving it is and what skills someone would need to get this working. I understand this is huge topic but want to get an idea of how this is done and even though I wont be able to do anything like that myself I would like to understand the process and what's involved

Again, if the questions and my explanation is confusing I apologise. I found it very hard to explain

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This is the world of microcontrollers and often though changing the world of 8/16 bit processors from Microchip, Atmel, TI and others. You might want to look over at electronics.stackexchange.com. Typically these microcontrollers have everything built-in and only have a small amount of external I/O to interface to the outside world. Often and mostly now programmed in C. – kenny Nov 8 '11 at 1:28
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@kenny, you have never really programmed a driver until you have programmed it on both sides! And yes, Electronics.stackexchange.com covers a lot of this and has many questions available. – Kortuk Nov 8 '11 at 3:10
    
This cvel.clemson.edu/auto/auto_buses01.html describes the various networks that might be found in current automobiles. This company matrixmultimedia.com/eblocks.php makes a build what you want system that includes CAN and LIN modules. – dbasnett Nov 12 '11 at 14:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

More general answers:

There's generally flash memory for storage. There may be a tiny ROM with a boot loader.

Java is rarely used for a variety of reasons; C/C++ is pretty common. I prefer Forth, Scheme, etc. because they're more interactive, and still pretty fast, but C is fine. Assembly is still used, but generally rarely, and then usually for low-level, time-critical things.

OSes are all over the place. Depending on needs, some will be an RTOS (real-time OS when things must be deterministic). Could just be a small Linux kernel, OS-9, uCos, home-spun, you name it.

There are some general-purpose embedded libraries or abstraction layers, but many embedded systems are very specialized, making such things not as useful. SOC (System on chip) manufacturers will generally have an SDK that makes interfacing with their particular hardware easier.

These days chips are generally flashed via USB/etc.

Arduino was already mentioned. There are a million different little tiny computers; check out any issue of Circuit Cellar for enough ads to make you dizzy. Some are more fun than others, like the TI Watch dev system or USB-dongle-sized wee machines.

Robotics are a great place to get started, because they mix in just about every embedded system need into one fun package just waiting to take over the world.

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Take a good hard look at Arduino. It's a good introduction to using Atmel ATMega microcontrollers. It's coded in a language similar to C++ called Processing.

Sample commands:

Check if a button is pressed, and if it is, turn an LED on. Button is on pin 3 (to ground), 4 is to LED.

if(digitalRead(3) == HIGH){
   digitalWrite(4, HIGH);
}

Blink an LED. (Pin 13)

while(1){
   digitalWrite(13, HIGH);
   delay(100);
   digitalWrite(13, LOW);
   delay(100);
}

Arduino programs the microcontroller over USB, using a built-in usb to serial adapter. You can control anything with it - suppose you wanted to switch a 110V AC adapter. You can just hook up a relay that runs a coil off of 5V to switch it on. You can also read in switches, temperature sensors, light sensors, magnetic sensors, accelerometers, serial, TTL, SPI, 1-wire, etc... Once you get started the only thing that will stop you will be your budget!

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It might be worth noting that it can program over USB because it is loaded with a bootloader and is writing to its own ROM. Many microcontrollers in embedded applications have hardware internal and an external programmer that writes the ROM the first time. – Kortuk Nov 8 '11 at 3:11
    
Good point, but for the questioner's point of view, all he needs to know is that the code flows through the USB cable to his LEDs. I'm sure it's a situation he'll face eventually on his journey :) – Tim Gostony Nov 8 '11 at 3:23
    
Also worth noting that Arduino programs (or Sketches as the project bizarrely refers to them), are a simplified subset of C. The development tool in fact generates C code and compiles it, so is a sort of pre-processor. – Clifford Nov 8 '11 at 21:55
    
Sure that Arduino is one way to do it, but I don't think there are many appliances out there actually using it. Most manufacturers use plain microcontrollers directly. Which doesn't mean there is anything wrong with Arduino, it is just a matter of cost and I'm not sure if the advantages of arduino have value in industrial designs. That being said, I agree that Arduino is an extremely good resource for the OP to get introduced in the microcontroller world. – payala Nov 9 '11 at 5:34

Start with something simple and build over it. You have asked a very broad question.

Start here: Controlling The Real World With Computers

And: Use the right tool for the job: embedded programming

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Check out the PIC microcontroller by Microchip. You will need some type of programmer or development board. These usually connect to a PC via USB for programming purposes. There are many compilers for PIC. The most popular ones implement a C-like language.

Here is a catalog that lists development kits for PIC by CCS.

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I'm guessing that there is ROM and some CPU chips where software controlling the parts is stored.

Yes. Software on all embedded systems is executed from ROM (flash), rather than from RAM as in your PC. Data that needs to be preserved is stored in ROM (eeprom/flash) as well.

Now this software is usually written in Java or low level C(++?) or even lower?

All modern automotive firmware development is most likely done in C. Older firmware is likely written in assembler. C++ is used in some rare cases. Java is not used at all.

Are there any libraries commonly used for this sort of thing? Or the chips come preprogrammed with these and maybe some basic operating systems?

No, all hardware drivers are typically developed by each manufacturer, there are no standard libraries as such, save for the big buzzword in automotive right now, AUTOSAR, which is an attempt to standardize common drivers and have them pre-made in hardware, to reduce software bugs.

how that chip is programmed with software? There is some sort of ROM writing device needed is that right?

Yes. You have a "pod" of some sort that burns the output of your linker into on-chip ROM. The most common, industry de-facto interface is JTAG, but in addition to that, each MCU manufacturer tends to have their own non-standard solutions as well.

is this something that would be able to play around at home via my laptop and if so what equipment I would need in addition to laptop?

Certainly, all you need is a "starter kit" from a MCU vendor. These typically include a pre-made evaluation board, a programming pod and a compiler. I would not necessarily go with the current market hype, I really don't see how Atmel or ARM would be more beginner-friendly than anything else. If you are interested in a certain, specific car model, you should find out what MCU that model is using and pick the same one. I believe Renesas/NEC and Freescale holds most of automotive MCU market, though I can't cite any report. Those two certainly have the best reputation for automotive MCUs anyhow.

Would anyone be able to point me to resources where I could read more on it

A beginner guide to C programming on MCUs/embedded systems can be found here. It is using the obsolete automotive MCU 68HC12 by Motorola/Freescale, but the principles are universal for any MCU.

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You've asked a fairly broad question -- generally not Good Form on SO, but breaking it up into smaller pieces probably couldn't improve the answers, so I'll answer it as it is.

Many embedded devices are EEPROM-programmable. You can buy your own EEPROM burning tools. Some embedded devices are ASIC chips, which are an affordable way to get custom-programmed chips which offer good customization via a programming language somewhat cheaper than a CPU, which might require far more memory to host something akin to an OS and a programming environment.

Back in the day, I understand FORTH was a common choice for embedded environments, as it didn't provide much and didn't ask much -- it was pretty simple. C is another good choice, as the language run-time environment doesn't demand much and can be pared back very far without losing too many niceties. (Dynamic memory allocation is often unavailable.)

Some small chips are designed specifically for Java -- but I don't know how well that has survived in modern industry.

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You will want an automotive grade microcontroller. There are many vendors and flavors. Yes they include a flash and some ram of some sort. You burn the program into the rom in various ways, sometimes a special programmer, or jtag or there is a serial bootloader.

Sounds like you are not very familiar with this environment, start slow, blink an led, sample a button, work your way up to lcd panels and the like then worry about a complete application like the controller you are talking about. Dont worry about getting the automotive grade nor worry about building your own board, there are a ton of eval boards under $50 as well as under $25.

the msp430 from TI is good, they are giving them away, up to 3 per order at $4.30, you cant argue with that, everything you need for under five bucks (plus free downloads). The PIC from microchip used to be wildly popular but most have passed them by, they probably have the cheapest one time programmables as there is so little to the processor. For a while now the avr from atmel is wildly popular with hobbyist. They were popular before the arduino came out but now that that has happened it has given them another boost. there are many flavors. I think the uno has everything onboard, some of the others though you want to buy the little ftdi based serial to usb thing that plugs in the side. sparkfun has a couple of snap kits a lillypad version and perhaps arduino pro mini version or something like that. oh, other than say the msp430 from ti and some others, sparkfun.com is a great source for a lot of these boards. you can get the msp430 launchpad board there for a little over five bucks as well. anyway you are looking at aboug $40 to $50 to get into an arduino. There is a free sandbox to play with if you are into that or you can write lower level code as well and not be stuck in the sandbox. ARM is taking over everything, they have a good foundation to build upon. You can only help your career by learning something about ARM processors. They can compete in this market as well as the high end as well as dominate the battery powered market (phones, cameras, mp3 players, etc). horsepower to price and size and so they say power, you cannot compete. the older ones are arm7 based, lots of olimex header boards at sparkfun and elsewhere around the world, the sam7 for example on sale for like $20, lpc's and others. The cortex-m series is taking over the microcontroller sized arms and you have things like the stellaris back at ti (is dripping with all the things you are interested in for your A/C controller for $50 - $100) or the stm32 family from st and some lpcs. The mbed2 board on sale at sparkfun and others is very easy to use, lpc based, about $45 to $50 avoid the lpcxpresso board btw. you can get into an stm32 based board for around $10 the stm32 value line series, there are a few of them, do not confuse it with the stm8 value line discovery.

I have an ever increasing list of boards and low level example programs (Blink the led, send some bytes out the uart, get your feet wet so that you can take the next step without fear) at github.com/dwelch67. I also have a couple of simulators so you can play with the tools and programming without having to invest any money. step one is getting your program compiled and running, step two is some simple I/O then a lot of learning about various interfaces (spi, i2c, etc) and peripherals (timers, lcd controllers, pwm, etc). Then you can consider a complete application like the one you are talking about.

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I believe Freescale, Renesas/NEC and Infineon hold the largest automotive MCU market shares by far. So if you are aiming to work with automotive apps, it might be wiser to pick one of those instead. – Lundin Nov 9 '11 at 13:44

The part with the user interface (the head unit) need not be the one which does the work, these may be different units connected by a bus (most of the time in a car it's CAN, but there's also the cheaper and simpler LIN and some others). There are a lot of little computers in a modern car (say 50).

  1. Most contain microcontrollers with integrated flash and RAM, the bigger ones also have external memory. It starts at a few KB and goes up to tens or hundreds of MB. Most of the time they are programmed C, or C++ for bigger stuff like a head unit. Java exists but is rare, though some people now work on head units with Android.

  2. It's a mess. The smallest ones don't have much of an OS to speak of, or maybe OSEK, the bigger ones have some real-time operating system (RTOS, I know of VxWorks, QNX, µItron) or not so real-time OS (Linux, Windows CE, Android). As for libraries, much is written from scratch because of the lack of resources (especially memory) or due to special needs, some code (e.g. OS, codecs) is licensed or even open-source.

  3. It's a mess. The devices usually contain flash memory, but every manufacturer or even each device family has its peculiar method for programming, often via debuggers, which often use JTAG. Or via bootloaders connected to the serial port. Or USB. Or FTP via Ethernet via USB-Adapter. Often you have to make some funny moves in the correct sequence for programming (pressing some buttons, giving some commands via various interfaces, rebooting).

  4. Arduino is a nice and gentle start, and you can also program the underlying AVR in C later if you like. The next logical step after the 8-bit AVR would be some cheap developer board with a 32-bit ARM Cortex M3, for example the Olimex LPC-P1343. Though in my experience the automotive industry uses a lot of Renesas controllers, which are somewhat harder to get as a hobbyist. But for getting started with embedded programming that doesn't matter much.

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I'm guessing that there is ROM and some CPU chips where software controlling the parts is stored.

Many embedded systems use a micro-controller(MCU) or system-on-a-chip (SoC), these include on a single chip one or more CPU cores, plus ROM (usually Flash) memory, RAM, and a selection of peripheral devices and interfaces such as UART, USB, GPIO, ADC, DAC, SPI, I2C, Timer/Counters, Ethernet controller, CAN, SDIO, LCD controller and many more. Because of die space limitations and the relative low density of Flash and SRAM, an MCU may also have external ROM or RAM memory, and may have an SDRAM controller to allow high density and inexpensive SDRAM to be used.

Often the code is stored in on-chip Flash or OTP ROM (one-time programmable ROM), but external memory may be used. Some systems execute code directly from ROM, others copy the ROM image to RAM for execution (which is often faster, and the ROM image may be compressed to reduce its footprint). If code is not executed from ROM, but copied to RAM, it can be stored in cheap, high density NAND Flash.

Now this software is usually written in Java or low level C(++?) or even lower?

Running Java requires a JVM and usually an OS. Phone apps, and Android applications are often written in java, but it is not a systems level language. The core OS and the JVM itself would be written in a low-level natively executed language. Some chips include partial Java bytecode execution in hardware (such as ARM's Jazelle unit), but that is intended to accelerate Java execution rather than directly implement a complete JVM in hardware.

C is the most commonly uses systems and application level language in deeply embedded systems, increasingly C++ is used, especially on larger systems. Assembler code is more often used only for the lowest level bootstrap and initialisation code; once a C runtime environment is established, higher level languages are more common. Some very small 8 bit systems are still likely to be entirely coded in assembler. While if you system is large enough to run Linux for example, it could even use scripting languages for some elements of the application. A lot of time critical DSP functions are often coded in assembler as well, though common standard functions and algorithms are typically provided as libraries to a higher level language by either the tool or chip vendor (who are sometimes the same).

Are there any libraries commonly used for this sort of thing? Or the chips come preprogrammed with these and maybe some basic operating systems?

There is an extensive ecosystem of embedded systems libraries both commercial and open-source. These may include RTOS kernels, complete operating systems, file-systems, and peripheral libraries. Often the chip-vendor will provide a library of drivers or on-chip peripherals. These drivers are usually "bare-metal" (i.e. not OS dependent), provided as source-code, and typically low-level. If you uses them within an OS you might typically have to use them to build a higher-level and more OS friendly driver.

Devices do not typically come pre-programmed. Some development and evaluation hardware may be preprogrammed with demonstration code, larger evaluation hardware may be pre-loaded with Linux or WinCE.

how that chip is programmed with software? There is some sort of ROM writing device needed is that right?

There are may ways. Many modern MCUs include on-chip debug and programming hardware (usually a JTAG interface, though proprietary interfaces are also commom), this allows on-chip, and in many cases off-chip Flash memory to be programmed from a PC host using a JTAG debugger or programmer.

To allow programming without often expensive JTAG programmers, many MCUs include a pre-programmed bootrom. This is a small program that allows code to be loaded and executed via an interface such as UART (serial) or USB. The bootrom may include Flash programming code, or it may be even simpler than that, and require a secondary bootloader to be loaded and executed in RAM and have that program the Flash.

For volume production, chips can preprogrammed before being placed on the board by a gang-programmer. This is often a service provided by the device vendor or board assembler.

is this something that would be able to play around at home via my laptop and if so what equipment I would need in addition to laptop?

The answer to that question would depend entirely on your budget. You can get started for a few ten's of dollars. For serious development you will want some debug hardware that will allow you to run the chip in a PC based source-level debugger as you might a PC app.

Would anyone be able to point me to resources where I could read more on it?

A professional resource is Embedded.Com (now renamed but less easily remembered as EETimes Embedded), but that would be rather starting at the deep-end! You might be more comfortable with something like the relatively simple Arduino project or the somewhat higher-end BeagleBoard project.

A great hobbyist resource if you happen to opt for the Atmel AVR range of MCUs is AVR Freaks. AVR has the advantage of being I think the only 8bit device supported by the GNU compiler.

Another resource if you want to develop projects using open-source tools on an ARM platform (or which there are many), on Windows is Martin Thomas's excellent ARM-Projects site. He hosts hist own GNU tools distribution, but also has links to others that may be more up-to-date and maintained.

I'm trying to get general idea of how it works, how involving it is and what skills someone would need to get this working.

It can take a while to get anything interesting up-and-running on your own, but there are many examples and application notes with code that can get you more instant gratification. A knowledge of electronics is useful. While most development and evaluation boards have a range of interfaces, switches, buttons, indicators, and sometimes LCD displays or other devices, they are normally primarily intended to interface with application specific hardware that you might build yourself. This is especially true for mechatronic systems where you will need additional hardware to drive and control high-current devices such as motors and actuators, or to interface with sensors.

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