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Is there an implementation of MapReduce/Hadoop on Azure?

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14 Answers 14

Microsoft Research has DryadLINQ which is a powerful LINQ expression distribution engine. I hope they port this to Azure!

Automatic parallelization: from sequential declarative code the DryadLINQ compiler generates highly parallel query plans spanning large computer clusters. For exploiting multi-core parallelism on each machine DryadLINQ relies on the PLINQ parallelization framework.

It has an implementation of MapReduce like this:

public static IQueryable<Rs> MapReduce<Ts, Ms, K, Rs> (
    this IQueryable<Ts> source,
    Expression<Func<Ts, IEnumerable<Ms>>> mapper,
    Expression<Func<Ms, K>> keySelector,
    Expression<Func<IGrouping<K, Ms>, IEnumerable<Rs>>> reducer) {

    IQueryable<Ms> mapped = source.SelectMany (mapper);
    IQueryable<IGrouping<K, Ms>> groups = mapped.GroupBy (keySelector);
    return groups.SelectMany (reducer);
}

Amazingly simple implementation! With the power of DryadLINQ, I don't see why you need to be constrained to MapReduce - you can simply create the exact LINQ query that returns the information you're looking for.

NOTE: this is my approximation of their implementation - the PDF does not contain the exact method signature or implementation

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1  
DryadLINQ is for clusters and it does not work with Windows Azure. Neither it is available outside Microsoft. –  Rinat Abdullin Jun 18 '09 at 23:02
3  
Just because it's not available outside of microsoft right now doesn't mean it won't be in the future ;-) –  Joel Martinez Aug 14 '09 at 4:18
2  
I've been using DryadLinq (outside MS) for 3 months now and love it, and I agree with George about not needing to express the problem in MapReduce structure. The first thing I did in DryadLinq was implement an algorithm using the MapReduce function. Then write the algorithm using Linq. The linq implementation executed 5X faster because its not hampered with trying to express everything as KVPs. Its also not filling the hard disks with massive amounts of KVPs, so there is much less IO overhead. MapReduce is very parallizable but not very efficient. If you have a better way, use it. –  Turbo Jan 27 '10 at 16:10
1  
There is an academic release of Dryad research.microsoft.com/en-us/downloads/… –  Development 4.0 Feb 1 '11 at 5:50
3  
Microsoft has discontinued Dryad in favor of an Azure Hadoop implementation that is currently on beta. RIP Dryad –  Panagiotis Kanavos Feb 8 '12 at 15:38

Recently, Microsoft has released an implementation of MapReduce on Azure called Project Daytona. You can download it here (which includes documentation and sample projects).

As an example, the Map and Reduce functions to count words would look like this...

public IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, int>> Map(int key, string value, MapContext<int, string> context)
{
    foreach (string word in Regex.Split(value, "[^a-zA-Z0-9]", RegexOptions.Singleline).
        Where(tuple => !string.IsNullOrEmpty(tuple)))
    {
        yield return new KeyValuePair<string, int>(word, 1);
    }
} 

public IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, int>> Reduce(string key, IEnumerable<int> values, ReduceContext<string, int> context)
{
    yield return new KeyValuePair<string, int>(key, values.Sum());
}
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Just to share my knowledge on this. We have implemented a MapReduce on the Amazon cloud platform, using cloud services, such as queue (Amazon SQS), table (SimpleDB), and cloud storage(S3). The project is called Cloud MapReduce and it is in open source. The open source version only supports Amazon cloud, but it is fairly easy to port to Azure as Azure has the equivalent of SQS, SimpleDB and S3. Avanade has already ported Cloud MapReduce to Windows Azure, but unfortunately the source code is not open. You will have to contact Avanade to see how to use it. I would be happy to connect if anyone is interested. My contact info is at the Cloud MapReduce site.

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Check out Twister4Azure: http://salsahpc.indiana.edu/twister4azure/index.html

It's the closest thing I've seen to a true MapReduce pattern on Azure. It doesn't (and cannot) behave like Hadoop, but takes advantage of Azure features to deal with faults. From a programming model you can implement Map and Reduce methods as you'd expect.

From their word count sample:

protected override int Map(IntKey key, StringValue value, string programArgs,
                           List<KeyValuePair<NullKey, NullValue>> dynamicData,
                           IOutputCollector<StringKey, IntValue> outputCollector)
{
    string line = value.GetTextValue();
    string[] words = line.Split(' ');
    foreach (string word in words)
    {
        outputCollector.Collect(StringKey.GetInstance(word), IntValue.GetInstance(1));
    }
    return 0;
}

public override int Reduce(StringKey key, List<IntValue> values, string programArgs,
                           IOutputCollector<StringKey, IntValue> outputCollector)
{
    int count = values.Sum(value => value.Value);
    var outValue = new IntValue {Value = count};
    outputCollector.Collect(key, outValue);
    return 0;
}
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There were anouncements recently about Hadoop on Windows and Windows Azure, like this one

You might want to have a look at this video. Alex Stojanovic, who's working on isotope project talks about HDFS, Hadoop, Hive, Pig, Sqoop, Mahoot, Lucene, Pegasus in Windows and Windows Azure and there relationship with Microsoft Business Intelligence (BI) tools.

There's a CTP available now. You might want to go to www.hadooponazure.com and register yourself to get an invitation code.

You can have an idea of how this looks like in a blog post I wrote recently.

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I'm not sure there's an out-of-the-box solution in Azure, but AWS might have what you're looking for (in beta): http://aws.amazon.com/elasticmapreduce/

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No, there is not at the moment. And it does not look like there is one coming soon. Details

Cloud Computing: could Windows Azure catch up with Amazon?

PS: Elastic Map Reduce is not solution for .NET developers till Amazon starts including Mono that could be used with Hadoop Streaming.

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in other words, forget Azure - go straight to using Hadoop yourself, or via Amazon. –  gbjbaanb Aug 7 '09 at 14:21
2  
Another option is to wait for Microsoft to implement Dryad for Azure. They are already planning this (as discovered recently by looking at DryadLinq sources). –  Rinat Abdullin Aug 11 '09 at 12:00

If it is still not late to answer your question, yes Apache Hadoop is available on Windows Azure and currently in restricted CTP. You can learn great details on information on this regard in my MSDN blog and look for the tag "Hadoop": http://blogs.msdn.com/b/avkashchauhan/archive/tags/hadoop/

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Hadoop on Azure is currently an invite-only beta. I've been blogging, screencasting and writing about my tests of this beta- for more see my blog at http://www.LynnLangit.com

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You can sign up for the developer preview of Azure's new Hadoop offering here: https://www.hadooponazure.com/.

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Yes. Step by step instructions here with example on how to use it. The site also has more details on it.

http://www.amazedsaint.com/2013/03/taming-big-data-with-c-using-hadoop-on.html

BIG DATA for .NET Devs: HDInsight, Writing Hadoop Map Reduce Jobs In C# And Querying Results Back Using LINQ -

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