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I wish there is an efficient way to print out my format. As I know convert to string may occur performance issue. Is there any better method?

package main

import "fmt"

type T struct {
  order_no [5]byte
  qty int32
}
func (t T)String() string {
  return fmt.Sprint("order_no=", t.order_no, 
    "qty=", t.qty)
}

func main() {
        v := T{[5]byte{'A','0','0','0','1'}, 100}

    fmt.Println(v)
}    

The output is order_no=[65 48 48 48 49]qty=100 I wish it will be order_no=A0001 qty=100.

BTW, why func (t T)String() string work and func (t *T)String() string can not work.(on goplay)

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1  
v is a T, not a *T. Therefore, its method set doesn't include methods on *T (though a *T does have the methods of T). Go lets you call *T methods on v anyways (as a special case), but only as long as v is addressable. The value in an interface isn't addressable, so when you pass v as an interface parameter to fmt.Println, fmt.Println can't call a func (t *T) String() string on it, but it can call a func (t T) String() string. To get around this, you could pass &v. –  SteveMcQwark Nov 8 '11 at 4:07
    
Thanks, Steve, in my case, should I use fmt.Println(&v) instead of fmt.Println(v) to prevent a copy struct? –  Daniel YC Lin Nov 10 '11 at 4:24
    
Generally, yes, though you could also declare v as v := &T{...} and pass that directly. Sometimes it makes sense to pass around a struct by value, but here, since you're passing it to an interface and it's larger than a machine word, there really isn't one. –  SteveMcQwark Nov 13 '11 at 18:55
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
package main

import "fmt"

type T struct {
    order_no [5]byte
    qty      int32
}

func (t T) String() string {
    return fmt.Sprint(
        "order_no=", string(t.order_no[:]),
        " qty=", t.qty,
    )
}

func main() {
    v := T{[5]byte{'A', '0', '0', '0', '1'}, 100}
    fmt.Println(v)
}

Output:

order_no=A0001 qty=100
share|improve this answer
    
Does the string() convert create new memory allocate? If that's a C's null string, can I use the same way? –  Daniel YC Lin Nov 8 '11 at 3:41
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