Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to construct a linq query that applies rules to a list of boolean functions from a domain derived from two input sets, A and B.

However, I want to "break" when a match is found, so I end up with at most one result for each element of A.

I hope this makes sense to the seasoned functional people out there - My sense is that I"m on a track that's consistent with how things get done in that world, but I'm not sure if I'm actually on the right track...

Here's the code, hopefully it's clear what I'm doing:

List<int> a = new List<int>();
a.Add(1);
a.Add(2);
List<int> b = new List<int>();
b.Add(1);
b.Add(2); 
Func<int, int, string> map = (i, j) => i + "->" + j;
var rules = new List<Func<int,int,Tuple<bool, Func<int, int, string>>>>(); 
rules.Add((i, j) => new Tuple<bool, Func<int,int,string>>(i == j, (ii, jj) => map(ii, jj)));                                  
rules.Add((i, j) => new Tuple<bool, Func<int,int,string>>(i+j == 2, (ii,jj) => map(ii,jj)));                            
var q = from ai in a
        from bi in b
        from rule in rules
        let tuple = rule(ai, bi)
        where tuple.Item1 == true
        select tuple.Item2(ai, bi);  

Which results in:

1->1

1->1

2->2

Desired result:

1->1

2->2

What I'd like to have happen is when the first rule matches 1->1, I can exclude the second 1->1. It seems that would allow me to have primary rules and fallback rules that get applied in order but produce no extra mappings.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

It sounds like you are looking for enumerable.TakeWhile(predicate)

Example from MSDN:

        string[] fruits = { "apple", "banana", "mango", "orange", 
                              "passionfruit", "grape" };

        IEnumerable<string> query =
            fruits.TakeWhile(fruit => String.Compare("orange", fruit, true) != 0);

        foreach (string fruit in query)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(fruit);
        }

        /*
         This code produces the following output:

         apple
         banana
         mango
        */
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very cool. For some reason I never knew about TakeWhile. –  Issun Nov 12 '11 at 11:09

This is where distinct comes into play. Since each rule is uniquely identified by its rule representation, you can simply perform a distinct on the output, meaning:

        var q = from ai in a
                from bi in b
                from rule in rules
                let tuple = rule(ai, bi)
                where tuple.Item1 == true
                select tuple.Item2(ai, bi);

        q = q.Distinct().ToArray();

will result in:

1->1 

2->2 

rather than

1->1   

1->1   

2->2   
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.