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I am making a c insertion sort and it works fine except that after the sort the first number is always a weird negative number and the program errors out.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

void insertionSort(int list[], int last){
     int hold;
     int walker;
     int current;
     int count;

     count = 0;
     for (current = 1; current <= last; current++){
         hold = list[current];
         for (walker = current - 1; 
             walker >= 0 && hold < list[walker]; walker--){
                    list[walker + 1] = list[walker];
             }
         list [walker + 1] = hold;
         count++;
     }
     printf("\n\nHow many passes to sort?\n%d\n\n", count);
     return;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  int numbers[100];
  int i;

  srand(time(NULL));
  for (i = 0; i < 100; i++){
      numbers[i] = rand() % 100;
  }
  printf("Unsorted Numbers\n-------- -------\n");
  for (i = 0; i < 100; i++){
      printf("%d,", numbers[i]);
  }
  insertionSort(numbers, 100);
  printf("\nSorted Numbers\n-------- -------\n");
  for (i = 0; i < 100; i++){
      printf("%d,", numbers[i]);
  }
  system("PAUSE");  
  return 0;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are going OVER the array size within the loop. When current = last, list[last] is list[100], the 101th element of the array... this is also not good.

Edit. I just tested this out and it worked for me. Only thing i changed was the <= in the outer loop to n <

void insertionSort(int list[], int last){
 int hold;
 int walker;
 int current;
 int count;

 count = 0;
 for (current = 1; current < last; current++){
     hold = list[current];
     for (walker = current - 1; 
         walker >= 0 && hold < list[walker]; walker--){
                list[walker + 1] = list[walker];
         }
     list [walker + 1] = hold;
     count++;
 }
 printf("\n\nHow many passes to sort?\n%d\n\n", count);
 return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
still does it after I change it –  shinjuo Nov 8 '11 at 4:00
    
did you go through the rest of your sort? For instance, walker = current - 1; will be -1 when current is 0, and your inner loop will never be accessed. –  aleph_null Nov 8 '11 at 4:04
    
no matter what I seem to change it says stack around the variable 'numbers' is corrupted –  shinjuo Nov 8 '11 at 4:11
    
it appears that the highest number is always the corrupted one. It spits out -858993460 –  shinjuo Nov 8 '11 at 4:18
    
you know what... now that I think about it, your outer loop should be for(current=1; current<last; current++). Also, i think that the line before count++ right before the second loops end should be list [walker] = hold;. haven't tested it out though. –  aleph_null Nov 8 '11 at 4:21

If you declare an array like

int numbers[100]

numbers[99] is the last element. In your sort function you are accessing numbers[100] as well.

share|improve this answer
    
It still does it after that –  shinjuo Nov 8 '11 at 3:59
    
It gives me runtime stack error 2 stack around variable numbers was corrupted –  shinjuo Nov 8 '11 at 4:05

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