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In perl DBI, you can bind a hash element value to a specific column of your query results.
Such that,
as you fetch each row, the hash element value is updated to the current row.

I'm trying to figure out if there's a way to accomplish that in core perl,
using an hash of (array of arrays).

The end goal is to be able to run something like this:

my $i;
my @a = (
  [1,2,3],
  [4,5,6],
  [7,8,9]
);
my %superhash{'first', 'second', 'third'} = (\$i[0], \$i[1], \$i[2]);
for $i (@a) {
  print ${$hash{'first'}} . "\n";
}

I'd love to be able to point $hash{'first'} to the first element in an arrayref, without having to have an array to point to beforehand.

Expected output:

1
4
7

Of course, that code doesn't work, because there are no elements that $i references to, thus they are undefined.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The tie interface is Perl's way of making magic variables. In this case, a bit of glob magic needs to be thrown in due to the way the for loop assigns to its loop variable.

my @a = (
    [1,2,3],
    [4,5,6],
    [7,8,9]
);

{package Tie::Rows;
    my %keys = qw(first 0 second 1 third 2);
    sub TIEHASH {bless [$_[1]]}               # store glob reference
    sub FETCH {$${$_[0][0]}[$keys{$_[1]}]}    # deref glob as array, lookup key
}

tie my %hash, 'Tie::Rows', *i;  # passing the glob here

for our $i (@a) {  # since the for loop aliases at that level
    print $hash{first} . "\n";
}

which prints

1
4
7

You can also exploit dynamic scope to solve this problem:

sub first  () {$$_[0]}  # each of these uses the array in $_
sub second () {$$_[1]}
sub third  () {$$_[2]}

for (@a) {              # for loop puts each array into $_
    print second, $/;
}

which prints

2
5
8
share|improve this answer
    
These are both awesome explanations. Thank you! –  totallymike Nov 8 '11 at 13:30

You could conjure something up with tie, i.e. it is possible to make code like this work:

for my $i (@a) {
    tie %hash, 'FirstSecondThird', $i;
    print $hash{first}, "\n";
}

The magic is in the definition of the package FirstSecondThird (note, this is not optimized):

package FirstSecondThird;

sub TIEHASH {
  my $class = shift;
  my $self = bless { array => shift,
                     keys => { first => 0, second => 1, third => 2 } }, $class;
  $self;
}

sub FETCH {
  my ($self, $key) = @_;
  my $i = $self->{keys}->{$key};
  $self->{array}->[$i];
}

1;

package main;

my @a = ( [1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9] );

for my $i (@a) {
  tie %hash, 'FirstSecondThird', $i;
  print $hash{first}+$hash{third}, "\n";
}

Yields:

4
10
16
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Unless your data is huge, it is probably best to simply copy each row into a hash, like this

 for my $i (@a) {
  my %data;
  @data{qw/first second third/} = @$i;
  print $data{first}, "\n";
}
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