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I use boost::serialization for my classes. Since I have some inheritance, I have to use BOOST_CLASS_EXPORT to "register" my class. Hope I did not misunderstand anything.

I use this macro:

BOOST_CLASS_EXPORT(MyClass)

Or even I use this:

BOOST_CLASS_EXPORT_GUID(MyClass, "MyClass")

in one header file, e.g. MyClass.h, which also contains the definition of MyClass. However, even I tried to put the macro in one of my source (*.cpp) file, it fails again.

I get a segmentation fault at the end of main(). Stacktrace shows the call stack is almost the same with this problem. I cannot find a solution or workaround for this problem. I think the problem is because of the destructor, but I don't know how to solve it. I even cannot say this is my fault or a bug in boost. (I hope it's my fault that I can fix it by myself)

Is there any solution/workaround for this? And why does the problem occur?

My build environment is: Ubuntu 10.04 64-bit server (kernel 2.6.32), gcc 4.4.3, boost 1.40. (I found it on /usr/include/boost/version.hpp and use apt-cache show libboost-dev to see the version)

I am using -Wall -g3 -O0 as the compiler option.

Strangely, the problem occurs on only one of my machines. Another machine running CentOS (kernel 2.6.18), gcc 4.1.2, and boost 1.41 goes well.


Update: I reduce the whole project to a small example. It is put on the bottom and also available on my gist. The classes do nothing, and the program (of mine) does nothing. Nevertheless the BOOST_CLASS_EXPORT causes segmentation fault.

Notice that if I remove f1.cpp or f2.cpp, the problem disappears (multiple compilation unit needed). The similar condition occurs on class A/A_child and B/B_child. I have no idea about why the problem does not occur for only one class.

Code

Compile

g++ -Wall -g3 -O0 -o program main.cpp f1.cpp f2.cpp -lboost_serialization

f1.cpp

#include "MyClass.h"

f2.cpp (the same with f1.cpp)

#include "MyClass.h"

main.cpp

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
}

MyClass.h

#ifndef MYCLASS_H
#define MYCLASS_H

#include <boost/serialization/export.hpp>
#include <boost/serialization/vector.hpp>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    template<class Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, const unsigned int version)
    {
    }
};

class A_child: public A
{
public:
    template<class Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, const unsigned int version)
    {
        ar & boost::serialization::base_object<A>(*this);
    }
};
BOOST_CLASS_EXPORT(A_child)


class B
{
public:
    template<class Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, const unsigned int version)
    {
    }
};

class B_child: public B
{
public:
    template<class Archive>
    void serialize(Archive & ar, const unsigned int version)
    {
        ar & boost::serialization::base_object<B>(*this);
    }
};
BOOST_CLASS_EXPORT(B_child)


#endif
share|improve this question
    
Please post a complete but minimal, compilable and executable example that reproduces the error (as described at sscce.org). –  Björn Pollex Nov 8 '11 at 7:07
2  
Boost 1.40 is really old. Consider upgrading to 1.47. Especially since you say that it works in 1.41. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 8 '11 at 7:09
    
@bjorn-pollex: I've updated a minimal example. I notice that you did a formatting for me, thank you and I did the same formatting in my best effort. –  CrBoy Nov 8 '11 at 9:42

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