Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can you get the FQDN of a local machine in C#?

share|improve this question
add comment

9 Answers 9

up vote 77 down vote accepted

NOTE: This solution only works when targeting the .NET 2.0 (and newer) frameworks.

using System;
using System.Net;

//...

public static string GetFQDN()
{
    string domainName = NetworkInformation.IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties().DomainName;
    string hostName = Dns.GetHostName();

    if(!hostName.Contains(domainName))            // if the hostname does not already include the domain name
    {
        hostName = hostName + "." + domainName;   // add the domain name part
    }

    return hostName;                              // return the fully qualified domain name
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

A slight simplification of Miky D's code

    public static string GetLocalhostFqdn()
    {
        var ipProperties = IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties();
        return string.Format("{0}.{1}", ipProperties.HostName, ipProperties.DomainName);
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
Unlike Micky D's code this returns the hostname with an appended fullstop if the machine is not a member of a domain. –  Bosco Feb 12 '13 at 9:08
    
Also, this uses the NetBIOS name instead of the DNS host name. I believe NetBIOS names are only suitable within LANs. –  Sam Jun 13 '13 at 4:56
    
Perhaps add a .Trim(".") to the the last line to get rid of the . if it exists. –  David d C e Freitas Nov 26 '13 at 0:51
add comment

Here it is in PowerShell, for the heck of it:

$ipProperties = [System.Net.NetworkInformation.IPGlobalProperties]::GetIPGlobalProperties()
"{0}.{1}" -f $ipProperties.HostName, $ipProperties.DomainName
share|improve this answer
add comment

And for Framework 1.1 is as simple as this:

System.Net.Dns.GetHostByName("localhost").HostName

And then remove the machine NETBIOS name to retrieve only the domainName

share|improve this answer
    
Here in 2013, GetHostByName("localhost") is obsoleted. VS 2010 suggested I use GetHostEntry("localhost") instead, which works fine. –  piedar Jul 8 '13 at 16:33
    
@piedar, you might have missed the bit about this being for .NET 1.1. –  Sam Feb 27 at 22:17
    
I wanted to add updated information to this answer, as it was the simplest and thus my favorite. I probably didn't scroll far enough to see your answer, which had indeed rendered my comment unnecessary. –  piedar Feb 28 at 17:08
add comment

This is covered by this article. This technique is more brief than the accepted answer and probably more reliable than the next most-voted answer. Note that as far as I understand, this doesn't use NetBIOS names, so it should be suitable for Internet use.

.NET 2.0+

Dns.GetHostEntry("LocalHost").HostName

.NET 1.0 - 1.1

Dns.GetHostByName("LocalHost").HostName
share|improve this answer
    
IMO this should be the accepted answer. –  Dexter Legaspi Feb 24 at 14:49
add comment

A slight improvement on Matt Z's answer so that a trailing full stop isn't returned if the computer is not a member of a domain:

public static string GetLocalhostFqdn()
{
    var ipProperties = IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties();
    return string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ipProperties.DomainName) ? ipProperties.HostName : string.Format("{0}.{1}", ipProperties.HostName, ipProperties.DomainName);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that I think this uses the NetBIOS host name, so it may not be suitable for Internet use. –  Sam Jun 13 '13 at 5:16
add comment

You can try the following:

return System.Net.Dns.GetHostEntry(Environment.MachineName).HostName;

This shoud give you the FQDN of the current local machine (or you can specify any host).

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Used this as one of my options to combine host name and domain name for building a report, added the generic text to fill in when domain name was not captured, this was one of the customers requirements.

I tested this using C# 5.0, .Net 4.5.1

private static string GetHostnameAndDomainName()
{
       // if No domain name return a generic string           
       string currentDomainName = IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties().DomainName ?? "nodomainname";
       string hostName = Dns.GetHostName();

    // check if current hostname does not contain domain name
    if (!hostName.Contains(currentDomainName))
    {
        hostName = hostName + "." + currentDomainName;
    }
    return hostName.ToLower();  // Return combined hostname and domain in lowercase
} 

Built using ideas from Miky Dinescu solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to tidy it up, and handle exceptions, try this:

public static string GetLocalhostFQDN()
        {
            string domainName = string.Empty;
            try
            {
                domainName = NetworkInformation.IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties().DomainName;
            }
            catch
            {
            }
            string fqdn = "localhost";
            try
            {
                fqdn = System.Net.Dns.GetHostName();
                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(domainName))
                {
                    if (!fqdn.ToLowerInvariant().EndsWith("." + domainName.ToLowerInvariant()))
                    {
                        fqdn += "." + domainName;
                    }
                }
            }
            catch
            {
            }
            return fqdn;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
"and handle exceptions" - FAIL. –  Jörgen Sigvardsson Jun 15 '12 at 7:38
    
u think catch by itself handles the exception! –  Saher Jul 5 '12 at 16:48
    
I couldn't have handled it better myself! –  Malfist Jul 5 '12 at 19:53
    
No, I think that how you want to handle exceptions is something you need to decide for yourself. And if you can't get a domain name back, how would YOU propose to handle it? –  Roger Willcocks Jul 7 '12 at 20:18
4  
Log an error report and warn the user that something went wrong instead of supplying the client code with faulty information. –  dahvyd Oct 21 '12 at 21:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.