Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a website that is essentially a client-side web app, i.e. everything on the page is populate by scripts with data from ajax APIs. Users would be also signing in and signing out using a set of APIs.

My question is about how do deal with the following (but not quite extreme) use case:

  1. User opens browser tab A and go to the website and logged in as user #1.
  2. User opens browser tab B and also go to the website. Since there is a get_session API, the script restores the session on tab B.
  3. User logged out from tab B while leaves tab A open.
  4. User forgets about tab A for sometime, and go back and interactive with tab A.
  5. Scripts in tab A attempts to fetch new data as user #1 but encounter error.

Ideally, there should be some way in step 3 that the tab A would also log itself out when user clicked logged out in tab B.

It's possible to log out tab A in step 5 (GMail do that), but I think there should be a better way. Even checking in step 5 would be non-trivial, cause for such design every API must know exactly which user's data the script is requesting, or the below use case would generate incorrect output.

(1-3) same as above.

  1. User opens browser tab A and go to the website and logged in as user #1.
  2. User opens browser tab B and also go to the website. Since there is a get_session API, the script restores the session on tab B.
  3. User logged out from tab B while leaves tab A open.
  4. User log in again from tab B but this time as user #2.
  5. User goes back to tab A and interactive. While thinking the user is user #1, the script in Tab A request data from API.
  6. API returns data that belongs to user #2. Boom.

Is there a common practice to prevent these kind of problem? Thanks.

Tim

share|improve this question
    
Not quite sure how efficient this is, or if it is commonplace, but you could have a Javascript that checks every x seconds if User#1 is logged in. If not (session or cookie does not exist) logout user. – xbonez Nov 8 '11 at 7:37
    
@xbonez I thought so, but the back-end engineer guy responsible get_session would kill me if I do that (given the fact that would probably killing the server ...) – timdream Nov 8 '11 at 7:40
    
Certain amount of cross-window/document messaging is possible with the postMessage API. See here for the current support: caniuse.com/#search=cross-do – martineno Nov 8 '11 at 7:43
    
As far as I can see it, @timdream , this is the only way to do it. Unless you use websockets, which is not a standard by now; you will have to check this session with a script that fires every x seconds. – OptimusCrime Nov 8 '11 at 7:44
1  
Common issue on "Multiple login in single browser"...generally speaking, this is possible if tab A and tab B can provide different authentication token to proof their identity, and the app should be able to restore identity there is no logout on the tab. However, this can be a kind of security problem as the logout process will require to logout all the tabs! (Or your backend engineer will kill you) – vincicat Nov 8 '11 at 8:15

The ajax response should indicate as an error condition that the user has logged out; on the client side, detect this error and perform the appropriate action. Obviously this only works when there is an ajax response, so you might want to implement some kind of 'hearbeat' mechanism, that is, the client sends a ping-like ajax message to the server every few seconds. When you log out, the server will respond to the heartbeat with a 'user logged out' error, and the client can go into 'not logged in' mode.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That would be similar to comment #1. I'll think about that. – timdream Nov 8 '11 at 7:48
    
A major flaw with this approach is that the session will never timeout. Suppose user is idle for a long time, then ideally the session must get invalidated automatically after the defined session timeout period, but with this approach,as we are pinging the server every few seconds to check its status, it will never timeout – anu Nov 8 '11 at 7:56
    
@anu: true. If you need a session to time out even if the browser is still open, you can of course implement your own timeout that doesn't slide on heartbeat messages, but rather only on 'real' actions. – tdammers Nov 8 '11 at 10:56

I don't think there is, because such communication between pages (tabs) would be a significant security weakness. However, you could achieve the same effect by having each page (tab) polling the server to see if the session is still valid. Or use one of the event-handling techniques such as long-polling or streaming in an iframe.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.