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A definition like

def foo(x: Int) = x + 1

is nice and short and looks pretty, but when the signature itself gets uncomfortably long,

def foo[T <: Token[T]](x: ArrayBuffer[T], y: T => ArrayBuffer[() => T]): (T, T, BigDecimal) = {
    // ...
}

I don't know where to split it. I find all of the following to look awkward:

def foo(
    x: Int,
    y: Int
): Int = {
    // ...
}

def foo(
        x: Int,
        y: Int
    ): Int =
{
    // ...
}

def foo(
        x: Int,
        y: Int
    ): Int
= {
    // ...
}

def foo(
        x: Int,
        y: Int
    ):
Int = {
    // ...
}

But, given that I'm going to have to get used to one of these, which will cause the least annoyance to my teammates?

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I personally use the top one, since it's most consistent with all other indenting. But I also think this is more of a Programmers.SE question than a SO question. –  Rex Kerr Nov 8 '11 at 10:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The Scala style guide has nothing to say on this. In fact it recommends using methods with fewer parameters :-).

For function invocations it does recommend splitting so that each subsequent line aligns with the first parenthesis:

foo(someVeryLongFieldName,
    andAnotherVeryLongFieldName,
    "this is a string",
    3.1415)

Personally in your case I would split according to a 'keep like things together' rule:

def foo[T <: Token[T]]
       (x: ArrayBuffer[T], y: T => ArrayBuffer[() => T])
       : (T, T, BigDecimal) = {
  // ...
}

So the parameters are on one line, the return type is on a single line and the type restriction is on a single line.

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In Haskell, long type signatures are often written in this fashion:

someFunc :: (Some Constraints Go Here)
         => Really Long Arg1 Type
         -> Really Long Arg2 Type
         -> Really Long Result Type
somefunc x y = ...

To translate this Haskellism into Scala,

def foo [ T <: Token[T] ]
        ( x : ArrayBuffer[T]
        , y : T => ArrayBuffer[() => T]
        )   : (T, T, BigDecimal) = {
    // ...
}

That's how I would do it. Not sure how kosher it is with the Scala community.

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