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I need to concatenate two String arrays in Java.

void f(String[] first, String[] second) {
    String[] both = ???
}

What is the easiest way to do this?

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41 Answers 41

I think the best solution with generics would be:

/* This for non primitive types */
public static <T> T[] concatenate (T[]... elements) {

    T[] C = null;
    for (T[] element: elements) {
        if (element==null) continue;
        if (C==null) C = (T[]) Array.newInstance(element.getClass().getComponentType(), element.length);
        else C = resizeArray(C, C.length+element.length);

        System.arraycopy(element, 0, C, C.length-element.length, element.length);
    }

    return C;
}

/**
 * as far as i know, primitive types do not accept generics 
 * http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2721546/why-dont-java-generics-support-primitive-types
 * for primitive types we could do something like this:
 * */
public static int[] concatenate (int[]... elements){
    int[] C = null;
    for (int[] element: elements) {
        if (element==null) continue;
        if (C==null) C = new int[element.length];
        else C = resizeArray(C, C.length+element.length);

        System.arraycopy(element, 0, C, C.length-element.length, element.length);
    }
    return C;
}

private static <T> T resizeArray (T array, int newSize) {
    int oldSize =
            java.lang.reflect.Array.getLength(array);
    Class elementType =
            array.getClass().getComponentType();
    Object newArray =
            java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(
                    elementType, newSize);
    int preserveLength = Math.min(oldSize, newSize);
    if (preserveLength > 0)
        System.arraycopy(array, 0,
                newArray, 0, preserveLength);
    return (T) newArray;
}
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Or with the beloved Guava:

String[] both = ObjectArrays.concat(first, second, String.class);
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2  
While it is good to use libraries, it's unfortunate that the problem has been abstracted away. Therefore the underlying solution remains elusive. –  user924272 Apr 9 at 0:15
1  
Whats the problem with abstraction? Dunno what's the deal with reinventing the wheel here, if you want to learn the problem the check the source or read on it. Professional code should be using high-level libraries, much better if it's developed inside Google! –  Breno Salgado Jul 15 at 20:11
Import java.util.*;

String array1[] = {"bla","bla"};
String array2[] = {"bla","bla"};

ArrayList<String> tempArray = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(array1));
tempArray.addAll(Arrays.asList(array2));
String array3[] = films.toArray(new String[1]); // size will be overwritten if needed

You could replace String by a Type/Class of your liking

Im sure this can be made shorter and better, but it works and im to lazy to sort it out further...

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One-liner in Java 8:

String[] both = Stream.concat(Arrays.stream(A), Arrays.stream(B))
                      .toArray(String[]::new);
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6  
Cool. Very nicely done. –  Makoto May 26 at 6:19

This one works only with int but the idea is generic

public static int[] junta(int[] v, int[] w) {

int[] junta = new int[v.length + w.length];

for (int i = 0; i < v.length; i++) {            
    junta[i] = v[i];
}

for (int j = v.length; j < junta.length; j++) {
    junta[j] = w[j - v.length];
}
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Should do the trick. This is assuming String[] first and String[] second

List<String> myList = new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(first));
myList.addAll(new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(second)));
String[] both = myList.toArray(new String[myList.size()]);
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Here's a method that will concatenate 2 arrays of type Foo (replace Foo in the code with your classname in question).

Foo[] concat(Foo[] A, Foo[] B) {
   int aLen = A.length;
   int bLen = B.length;
   Foo[] C= new Foo[aLen+bLen];
   System.arraycopy(A, 0, C, 0, aLen);
   System.arraycopy(B, 0, C, aLen, bLen);
   return C;
}

(source: Sun Forum )

Here is a version that was tested to work with generics:

public <T> T[] concatenate (T[] A, T[] B) {
    int aLen = A.length;
    int bLen = B.length;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    T[] C = (T[]) Array.newInstance(A.getClass().getComponentType(), aLen+bLen);
    System.arraycopy(A, 0, C, 0, aLen);
    System.arraycopy(B, 0, C, aLen, bLen);

    return C;
}

Note like all generics it will not work with primitives but with Objects.

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9  
You should probably add a remark, that one has to replace the T with the correct type. –  jrudolph Sep 17 '08 at 6:30
17  
no, he should start code with something like public static <T> T[]... –  Slartibartfast Sep 17 '08 at 21:44
45  
It got up-voted because it's the right idea. It may not be syntactically correct, but it illustrates which direction to go. –  Daniel Spiewak Oct 12 '08 at 15:42
9  
-1 T is a generic type, and this code is not working. –  Tom Brito May 28 '10 at 21:06
60  
T is not a generic type, its psuedo code, if T was a generic type it would have been <T>. Why am I arguing this?!?!?! –  Tom Fobear Mar 16 '11 at 0:13
ArrayList<String> both = new ArrayList(Arrays.asList(first));
both.addAll(Arrays.asList(second));

both.toArray();
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public class JoinArray {

static int[] testcase1 = {1,14,15,2,3};
static int[] testcase2 = {20,30,40,30,20};

public static void main(String args[]){
    JoinArray testInstance = new JoinArray();
    int[] result = testInstance.join(testcase1,testcase2);
    System.out.print("{");
    for (int i=0;i<result.length;i++){
        if (i>0)
            System.out.print(",");
        System.out.print(result[i]);
    }
    System.out.println("}");
}

//write your code here
public int[] join(int[] arr1,int[] arr2)
   {

      int[] arr3=new int[arr1.length+arr2.length];
      int[] result= new int[arr1.length+arr2.length];

      for(int i=0;i<arr1.length;i++)
      {
          arr3[i]=arr1[i];
      }

      for(int j=arr1.length,i=0;j<arr2.length+arr1.length;j++,i++)
      {
          arr3[j]=arr2[i];
      }

        result=arr3;
        return result;

   }
}
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String [] both = new ArrayList<String>(){{addAll(Arrays.asList(first)); addAll(Arrays.asList(second));}}.toArray(new String[0]);
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2  
Tricky, it compiles only if first and second are final –  orique Jun 21 '13 at 13:20
1  
True. I thought it was worth it to add a one-liner without external library. –  Rom Jun 21 '13 at 13:59

I found a one-line solution from the good old Apache Commons Lang library.
ArrayUtils.addAll(T[], T...)

Code:

String[] both = ArrayUtils.addAll(first, second);
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169  
I dunno, this is kind of cheating. I think most people probably won't want the extra dependency for this one method. –  Outlaw Programmer Sep 23 '08 at 19:15
56  
How is it "cheating" if it answers the question? Sure, having an extra dependency is probably overkill for this specific situation, but no harm is done in calling out that it exists, especially since there's so many excellent bits of functionality in Apache Commons. –  Rob Oct 12 '08 at 15:58
14  
I agree, this isn't really answering the question. High level libraries can be great, but if you want to learn an efficient way to do it, you want to look at the code the library method is using. Also, in many situations, you can't just through another library in the product on the fly. –  AdamC Jun 18 '09 at 17:09
32  
I think this is a good answer. POJO solutions have also been provided, but if the OP is using Apache Commons in their program already (altogether possible considering its popularity) he may still not know this solution. Then he wouldn't be "adding a dependency for this one method," but would be making better use of an existing library. –  Adam Nov 17 '09 at 15:36
7  
As @Kutzi pointed out below, this doesn't even compile, because there's no addAll() method that returns a String[]. –  Joachim Sauer Dec 1 '10 at 15:17

Another way to think about the question. To concatenate two or more arrays, one have to do is to list all elements of each arrays, and then build a new array. This sounds like create a List<T> and then calls toArray on it. Some other answers uses ArrayList, and that's fine. But how about implement our own? It is not hard:

private static <T> T[] addAll(final T[] f, final T...o){
    return new AbstractList<T>(){

        @Override
        public T get(int i) {
            return i>=f.length ? o[i - f.length] : f[i];
        }

        @Override
        public int size() {
            return f.length + o.length;
        }

    }.toArray(f);
}

I believe the above is equivalent to solutions that uses System.arraycopy. However I think this one has its own beauty.

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Wow! lot of complex answers here including some simple ones that depend on external dependencies. how about doing it like this:

String [] arg1 = new String{"a","b","c"};
String [] arg2 = new String{"x","y","z"};

ArrayList<String> temp = new ArrayList<String>();
temp.addAll(Arrays.asList(arg1));
temp.addAll(Arrays.asList(arg2));
String [] concatedArgs = temp.toArray(new String[arg1.length+arg2.length]);
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Concatenating strings:

String concat(String[] strings) {
    StringBuffer buf = new StringBuffer();
    for(int i=0; i < strings.length; i++) {
        buf.append(strings[i]);
    }
    return buf.toString();
}
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Please forgive me for adding yet another version to this already long list. I looked at every answer and decided that I really wanted a version with just one parameter in the signature. I also added some argument checking to benefit from early failure with sensible info in case of unexpected input.

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T> T[] concat(T[]... inputArrays)
{
  if(inputArrays.length < 2)
  {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("inputArrays must contain at least 2 arrays");
  }

  for(int i = 0; i < inputArrays.length; i++)
  {
    if(inputArrays[i] == null)
    {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("inputArrays[" + i + "] is null");
    }
  }

  int totalLength = 0;

  for(T[] array : inputArrays)
  {
    totalLength += array.length;
  }

  T[] result = (T[]) Array.newInstance(inputArrays[0].getClass().getComponentType(), totalLength);

  int offset = 0;

  for(T[] array : inputArrays)
  {
    System.arraycopy(array, 0, result, offset, array.length);

    offset += array.length;
  }

  return result;
}
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I found I had to deal with the case where the arrays can be null...

private double[] concat  (double[]a,double[]b){
    if (a == null) return b;
    if (b == null) return a;
    double[] r = new double[a.length+b.length];
    System.arraycopy(a, 0, r, 0, a.length);
    System.arraycopy(b, 0, r, a.length, b.length);
    return r;

}
private double[] copyRest (double[]a, int start){
    if (a == null) return null;
    if (start > a.length)return null;
    double[]r = new double[a.length-start];
    System.arraycopy(a,start,r,0,a.length-start); 
    return r;
}
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Using the Java API:

String[] f(String[] first, String[] second) {
    List<String> both = new ArrayList<String>(first.length + second.length);
    Collections.addAll(both, first);
    Collections.addAll(both, second);
    return both.toArray(new String[both.size()]);
}
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2  
Simply, but inefficient as it make an array for ArrayList and then generate another for toArray method. But still valid as it's simple to read. –  PhoneixS Mar 10 at 12:16

Look at this elegant solution (if you need other type than char, change it):

private static void concatArrays(char[] destination, char[]... sources) {
    int currPos = 0;
    for (char[] source : sources) {
        int length = source.length;
        System.arraycopy(source, 0, destination, currPos, length);
        currPos += length;
    }
}

You can concatenate a every count of arrays.

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In Haskell you can do something like that [a, b, c] ++ [d, e] to get [a, b, c, d, e]. These are Haskell lists concatenated but that'd very nice to see a similar operator in Java for arrays. Don't you think so ? That's elegant, simple, generic and it's not that difficult to implement.

If you want to, I suggest you to have a look at Alexander Hristov's work in his Hacking the OpenJDK compiler. He explains how to modify javac source to create a new operator. His example consists in defining a '**' operator where i ** j = Math.pow(i, j). One could take that example to implement an operator that concatenates two arrays of same type.

Once you do that, you are bound to your customized javac to compile your code but the generated bytecode will be understood by any JVM.

Of course, you can implement your own array concatenatation method at your source level, there are many examples on how to do it in the other answers !

There are so many useful operators that could be added, this one would be one of them.

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Here a possible implementation in working code of the pseudo code solution written by silvertab.

Thanks silvertab!

public class Array {

   public static <T> T[] concat(T[] a, T[] b, ArrayBuilderI<T> builder) {
      T[] c = builder.build(a.length + b.length);
      System.arraycopy(a, 0, c, 0, a.length);
      System.arraycopy(b, 0, c, a.length, b.length);
      return c;
   }
}

Following next is the builder interface.

Note: A builder is necessary because in java it is not possible to do

new T[size]

due to generic type erasure:

public interface ArrayBuilderI<T> {

   public T[] build(int size);
}

Here a concrete builder implementing the interface, building a Integer array:

public class IntegerArrayBuilder implements ArrayBuilderI<Integer> {

   @Override
   public Integer[] build(int size) {
      return new Integer[size];
   }
}

And finally the application / test:

@Test
public class ArrayTest {

   public void array_concatenation() {
      Integer a[] = new Integer[]{0,1};
      Integer b[] = new Integer[]{2,3};
      Integer c[] = Array.concat(a, b, new IntegerArrayBuilder());
      assertEquals(4, c.length);
      assertEquals(0, (int)c[0]);
      assertEquals(1, (int)c[1]);
      assertEquals(2, (int)c[2]);
      assertEquals(3, (int)c[3]);
   }
}
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A solution 100% old java and without System.arraycopy (not available in GWT client for example):

static String[] concat(String[]... arrays) {
    int lengh = 0;
    for (String[] array : arrays) {
        lengh += array.length;
    }
    String[] result = new String[lengh];
    int pos = 0;
    for (String[] array : arrays) {
        for (String element : array) {
            result[pos] = element;
            pos++;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
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How about simply

public static class Array { 

        public static  T[] concat(T[]... arrays) { 
            ArrayList al = new ArrayList();  
            for (T[] one : arrays) 
                Collections.addAll(al, one); 
            return (T[]) al.toArray(arrays[0].clone());
        }
}

And just do Array.concat(arr1, arr2). As long as arr1 and arr2 are of the same type, this will give you another array of the same type containing both arrays.

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You can try this

 public static Object[] addTwoArray(Object[] objArr1, Object[] objArr2){
    int arr1Length = objArr1!=null && objArr1.length>0?objArr1.length:0;
    int arr2Length = objArr2!=null && objArr2.length>0?objArr2.length:0;
    Object[] resutlentArray = new Object[arr1Length+arr2Length]; 
    for(int i=0,j=0;i<resutlentArray.length;i++){
        if(i+1<=arr1Length){
            resutlentArray[i]=objArr1[i];
        }else{
            resutlentArray[i]=objArr2[j];
            j++;
        }
    }

    return resutlentArray;
}

U can type cast your array !!!!!!

Hope it will help u

Cheer :)

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This is a converted function for a String array:

public String[] mergeArrays(String[] mainArray, String[] addArray) {
    String[] finalArray = new String[mainArray.length + addArray.length];
    System.arraycopy(mainArray, 0, finalArray, 0, mainArray.length);
    System.arraycopy(addArray, 0, finalArray, mainArray.length, addArray.length);

    return finalArray;
}
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2  
Wow. 3 long lines of code for what Ada does with the & operator. It always amazing me how primitive Java is. –  Martin Jul 4 '11 at 12:07

The easiest way i could find is as following :


List allFiltersList = Arrays.asList(regularFilters);
allFiltersList.addAll(Arrays.asList(preFiltersArray));
Filter[] mergedFilterArray = (Filter[]) allFiltersList.toArray();

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Here's my slightly improved version of Joachim Sauer's concatAll. It can work on Java 5 or 6, using Java 6's System.arraycopy if it's available at runtime. This method (IMHO) is perfect for Android, as it work on Android <9 (which doesn't have System.arraycopy) but will use the faster method if possible.

  public static <T> T[] concatAll(T[] first, T[]... rest) {
    int totalLength = first.length;
    for (T[] array : rest) {
      totalLength += array.length;
    }
    T[] result;
    try {
      Method arraysCopyOf = Arrays.class.getMethod("copyOf", Object[].class, int.class);
      result = (T[]) arraysCopyOf.invoke(null, first, totalLength);
    } catch (Exception e){
      //Java 6 / Android >= 9 way didn't work, so use the "traditional" approach
      result = (T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(first.getClass().getComponentType(), totalLength);
      System.arraycopy(first, 0, result, 0, first.length);
    }
    int offset = first.length;
    for (T[] array : rest) {
      System.arraycopy(array, 0, result, offset, array.length);
      offset += array.length;
    }
    return result;
  }
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Object[] obj = {"hi","there"};
Object[] obj2 ={"im","fine","what abt u"};
Object[] obj3 = new Object[obj.length+obj2.length];

for(int i =0;i<obj3.length;i++)
    obj3[i] = (i<obj.length)?obj[i]:obj2[i-obj.length];
share|improve this answer

Another one based on SilverTab's suggestion, but made to support x number of arguments and not require Java 6. It is also not generic, but I'm sure it could be made generic.


    private byte[] concat(byte[]... args) {
        int fulllength = 0;
        for (byte[] arrItem : args) {
            fulllength += arrItem.length;
        }

    byte[] retArray = new byte[fulllength];
    int start = 0;
     for (byte[] arrItem : args) {
        System.arraycopy(arrItem, 0, retArray, start, arrItem.length);
        start += arrItem.length;
    }
    return retArray;
}

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public String[] concat(String[]... arrays)
{
    int length = 0;
    for (String[] array : arrays) {
        length += array.length;
    }
    String[] result = new String[length];
    int destPos = 0;
    for (String[] array : arrays) {
        System.arraycopy(array, 0, result, destPos, array.length);
        destPos += array.length;
    }
    return result;
}
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Here's an adaptation of silvertab's solution, with generics retrofitted:

static <T> T[] concat(T[] a, T[] b) {
    final int alen = a.length;
    final int blen = b.length;
    final T[] result = (T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.
            newInstance(a.getClass().getComponentType(), alen + blen);
    System.arraycopy(a, 0, result, 0, alen);
    System.arraycopy(b, 0, result, alen, blen);
    return result;
}

NOTE: See Joachim's answer for a Java 6 solution. Not only does it eliminate the warning; it's also shorter, more efficient and easier to read!

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2  
The unchecked warning can be eliminated if you use Arrays.copyOf(). See my answer for an implementation. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 24 '09 at 7:30

protected by Sergey K. Mar 16 at 8:28

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