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I know that in case of dynamic binding only those method which are present in current class can be called. If child override parent method then the child method is executed otherwise parents method will be executed...

But in case of interfaces what is happening I don't know... Here's an example of what I mean:

interface TestInterface {
    public void show();
}

class Test implements TestInterface {
    public void show() {
        System.out.println("Hello in show");
    }

    public String toString() {
        System.out.println("Hello in To String");
        return "";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {   
        TestInterface obj = new Test();      
        obj.show();
        obj.toString();    // why it run vilate dynamic binding rule.. 
    }
}
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Lots of issues with your question. Spelling mistakes aside, what is that code?? The interface is not implemented by the class, There are no semicolons what is class A did you try to write and execute a code –  Ashley Nov 8 '11 at 8:38
    
All object are Object's by definition. That means all objects have all the methods of an Object. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 8 '11 at 8:44
    
@PeterLawrey, that's actually not at accurate answer. The methods available in compile time are the ones declared by the objects static type (in this case TestInterface). TestInterface does not extend Object (How could it? it's an interface, and Object is a class). –  aioobe Nov 8 '11 at 8:46
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In case of interfaces in java :-"All interfaces get all public and abstract method of Object class"

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3  
There are no abstract methods of the Object class. –  EJP Nov 8 '11 at 8:43
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This is because interfaces implicitly include all public methods declared in Object.

This is specified in the JLS, section 9.2 Interface Members.

9.2 Interface Members

[...]

  • If an interface has no direct superinterfaces, then the interface implicitly declares a public abstract member method m with signature s, return type r, and throws clause t corresponding to each public instance method m with signature s, return type r, and throws clause t declared in Object, unless a method with the same signature, same return type, and a compatible throws clause is explicitly declared by the interface.

[...]

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Because in case of interfaces its implicitly include all public methods declared in Object

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Your code does not compile. I changed your code to:

interface TestInterface {

    public void show();
}

class Test implements TestInterface {

    @Override
    public void show() {
        System.out.println("Hello in show");
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Hello in To String";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TestInterface obj = new Test();
        obj.show();
        System.out.println(obj.toString());     
    }

}

The result is:

Hello in show
Hello in To String
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