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If I have set my program to be a Windows Application, and used the AttachConsole(-1) API, how do I get Console.WriteLine to write to the console I launched the application from? It isn't working for me.

In case it is relevant, I'm using Windows 7 x64, and I have UAC enabled. Elevating doesn't seem to solve the problem though, nor does using start /wait.

Update

Some additional background that might help:

I've just discovered that if I go to the command prompt and type cmd /c MyProgram.exe, Then console output works. The same is true if I launch a command prompt, open a cmd.exe sub-process, and run the program from that sub-shell.

I've also tried logging out and back in, running from a cmd.exe launched from the start menu (as opposed to right-click -> command prompt), and running from a console2 instance. None of those work.

Background

I've read on other sites and in several SO answers that I can call the win32 API AttachConsole to bind my Windows Application to the console that ran my program, so I can have something that is "both a console application, and a Windows application".

For example, this question: Is it possible to log message to cmd.exe in C#/.Net?.

I've written a bunch of logic to make this work (using several other APIs), and I have gotten every other scenario to work (including redirection, which others have claimed won't work). The only scenario left is to get Console.WriteLine to write to the console I launched my program with. From everything I've read this is supposed to work if I use AttachConsole.

Repro

Here's a minimal sample - Note that the project is set to be a Windows Application:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Windows.Forms;

class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        if (!AttachConsole(-1))
        {
            MessageBox.Show(
                new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error())
                    .ToString()
                );
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Test");
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true, ExactSpelling = true)]
    private static extern bool AttachConsole(int processId);
}
  • When I run this from a command prompt, I don't get an error, but I don't get any console output either. This is the problem
  • If I add extra message boxes anywhere in the execution flow of the app, the message box gets displayed. I expect this, so all good here.
  • When I run this from Visual Studio or by double clicking on it, a message box with an error is displayed. I expect this, so no worries here (will use AllocConsole in my real app).

If I call Marshal.GetLastWin32Error after the call to Console.WriteLine, I get the error "System.ComponentModel.Win32Exception (0x80004005): The handle is invalid". I suspect that attaching to the console is causing Console.Out to get messed up, but I'm not sure how to fix it.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you mark your program as console application? –  CodesInChaos Nov 8 '11 at 8:54
1  
Very strange ... I also use AttachConsole(-1) in an application and it works without issue. I will compare the code when I get into work and post-back if there is any difference. @CodeInChoas: If you create it as a Console Application, you will always have the console window in the background. By using AttachConsole you get the best of both - an application that when opened via the command line (console) it will write to the console streams. –  Dennis Nov 8 '11 at 9:04
    
@CodeInChaos: That seems like the "well, duh!" solution :) But I don't really want "both a console and Windows app", I want either a console or Windows app, based on command line switches. And I don't want the console to blink off the screen when I launch it. This is a pretty common scenario, and I've found about a dozen threads to get everything working, including this piece. Except that this piece isn't working. If you think I should make my requirements more clear in my question, let me know and I'll gladly fix it. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 8 '11 at 9:07
    
You must have either a console app or a windows app. You choose that at the time you create the EXE. Windows treats them differently. The best approach is to create a Windows app, then at runtime decide whether to show the form. AttachConsole simply allows a windows app to write to a console. –  Cheeso Nov 8 '11 at 9:24
2  
@Cheeso: Except that AttachConsole doesn't allow the window to write to a console. That's exactly the part I'm trying to get working. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 8 '11 at 9:41

8 Answers 8

Had the same problem. Everything worked great when I launched the built .exe file, but failed to run inside the VS.

Solution:

  1. Check Enable the VS Hosting process.
  2. Run VS as administrator.

Maybe this will help other people to fix this issue.

share|improve this answer

I was suffering from the same problem with my application's current version (targeting .NET 4.0) but am sure AttachConsole(-1) did work as expected in earlier versions (which targeted .NET 2.0).

I found that I could get console output as soon as I removed my (custom) TraceListener from my application's .exe.config file, even though I don't know why yet.

Perhaps this is what's swallowing your console output as well...

Update

In fact I had a Console.WriteLine() in my custom trace listener's c'tor which was messing things up. After removing this line, console output after AttachConsole(-1) went back to normal.

share|improve this answer

Had the same problem and it appears that when running cmd.exe in Administrator mode AttachConsole() call succeeds but Console.Write() and Console.WriteLine() don't work. If you run cmd.exe normally (non-admin) everything seems to work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Will check this out (...eventually) and if this turns out to be the issue I'll mark this answer as accepted. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jan 23 '13 at 0:44
    
Hmm, I didn't have this problem while running cmd.exe although it says "Administrator: C:\Windows\system32\cmd.exe" in the title bar. However my app runs concurrently with cmd.exe so the next command prompt appears before my program produces output. Oops. –  Qwertie Jun 11 at 20:50

+1

I had the same problem. Console output would not show up using various flavours of AllocConsole or AttachConsole.

Check if you have disabled Enable the visual studio hosting process in your project configuration. Enabling this option magically made all console messages appear as expected for me. I'm running VS2010 and .NET4, but this post suggests the 'feature' is still there in VS2012.

share|improve this answer

I had a similar situation: could not get a Windows Application to output anything in the programmatically attached console. Eventually, it turned out that I was using Console.WriteLine once before AttachConsole, and that was tampering with everything that followed after.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the hint, tho if you look at my minimal repro you'll see I still have that problem in a program that doesn't do Console.WriteLine first. As people said, it is probably environmental. What could be causing it in my case, I have no idea. I'll try running my sample code on a different box and see if it doesn't fix it. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Apr 20 '12 at 17:28

I cannot see any significant difference between our implementations. For what it is worth, below is what I have in my application and it works fine. I also create a sample WPF application and it also worked fine.

I suspect that your issue is elsewhere. Sorry I couldn't be more help.

[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{            
    AttachProcessToConsole();    
}

private static void AttachProcessToConsole()
{
    AttachConsole(-1);
}

// Attaches the calling process to the console of the specified process.
// http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms681952%28v=vs.85%29.aspx
[DllImport("Kernel32.dll")]
private static extern bool AttachConsole(int processId);
share|improve this answer
    
Confirmation from people who know this should work is an upgrade from where I was an hour ago. Thanks for the input :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 8 '11 at 10:42
    
Just re-reading your question again I realise (thanks to comment from @CodeInChaos) that you are actually wanting a Windows Application and a Console Application. To achieve this you need to AllocConsole as demonstrated in @Cheeso's answer. –  Dennis Nov 8 '11 at 14:25
    
I'm going to do both, like his answer. I just am trying to get AllocConsole to work at all. I'll worry about the right fit problem (which everyone else seems to be worrying about for me, lol). I'm fine with bad behavior here, and I'm not submitting customers to it, so no worries. Considering all the push-back I'm geting though, maybe I should make the darn thing a console application and call it done tho. But it really digs at me when there's a solution everyone says should work, and it doesn't work for me :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 8 '11 at 19:50

This is how I do it in Winforms. Using WPF would be similar.

static class SybilProgram
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        if (args.Length > 0)
        {
            // Command line given, display console
            if ( !AttachConsole(-1) )  // Attach to a parent process console
                AllocConsole(); // Alloc a new console if none available


            ConsoleMain(args);
        }
        else
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());  // instantiate the Form
        }
    }

    private static void ConsoleMain(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Command line = {0}", Environment.CommandLine);
        for (int ix = 0; ix < args.Length; ++ix)
            Console.WriteLine("Argument{0} = {1}", ix + 1, args[ix]);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern bool AllocConsole();

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    private static extern bool AttachConsole(int pid);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Lovely code. It exhibits the same problem as my application tho. I launch a command prompt, run the program from there (App.exe someargs), and no text is output. If I run cmd /c App.exe someargs though, it seems to work (?!?) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 8 '11 at 9:44
1  
It works for me. (subject to the limitations described in the Raymond Chen blog post referenced elsewhere.) are you compiling with /t:winexe or /t:exe? They exhibit different behavior, but both "work" for me. –  Cheeso Nov 8 '11 at 11:45
1  
The prototype for AllocConsole and AttachConsole is not exactly correct, although it may works, all windows API uses BOOL instead of c99 bool(1 byte) or C#'s bool, so the returned data type mismatched between native and managed code. I've found a subtle bug due to this issue in .NET 1.1, I'm not sure about higher CLR version. The best way to avoid it is using [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)] –  zhaorufei Mar 7 '13 at 2:41

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