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As I understand assigning arrays is a Memory copy operation, will this work?

struct x{
    int i;
    int j;
} A[5];

struct y{
    int i;
    int j;
    struct y * next;
} B[5];

Then can I do:

B[0] = A[0];

and expect i and j copied over for index [0]?

EDIT: What I really want to know is how to make this work in C.

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What happened when you tried it? Or are you asking if we know another way to make it work? –  Ray Toal Nov 8 '11 at 8:41
    
Yes, thats more appropriate question. How to make this work. I will edit the original question with what I am doing –  nulltorpedo Nov 8 '11 at 8:46
    
Gotcha. memcpy will do that for you. Here is a reference to memcpy. –  Ray Toal Nov 8 '11 at 8:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, that line of code will not compile.

See http://codepad.org/6g3c9Ctz

You can use memcpy to make it work. See http://codepad.org/1I9Z3npC

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct x{
    int i;
    int j;
} A[5];

struct y{
    int i;
    int j;
    struct y * next;
} B[5];

int main() {
    A[0].i = 5;
    A[0].j = 7;
    memcpy(&B[0], &A[0], sizeof A[0]);
    printf("%d %d\n", B[0].i, B[0].j);
    return 0;
}
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perfect. That will work! –  nulltorpedo Nov 8 '11 at 8:54
    
Is the memory alignment nessescarily the same for x.j and y.j ? I know it will probably be in practice, but I only think it's guaranteed for i. The simpler solution is to embed struct x in struct y. –  gnud Nov 8 '11 at 8:56
2  
Addendum: The fact that this works was formalized in C99. Prior to C99 there were no guarantees, but it worked in all of the implementations anyway. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 8 '11 at 8:57
    
Thanks, @DietrichEpp. –  gnud Nov 8 '11 at 8:58
    
@gnud: As of C99, it is explicitly guaranteed to work even without embedding struct x into struct y. As the standards committee noted, it always worked anyway, and they just wanted to codify existing practices. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 8 '11 at 8:58

No, you cannot, because struct x and struct y are not compatible types.

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My suggestion is to embed struct x in struct y, like so:

struct x{
    int i;
    int j;
} A[5];

struct y{
    struct x x;
    struct y * next;
} B[5];

That way, it's easy to assign, and the memory layout of the first sizeof(struct x) bytes of both structs are guaranteed to be the same, even in C89.

You can now do

B[0].x = A[0];

Since the struct x is guaranteed to appear at the first byte of struct y in memory, you can still do

memcpy(&B[0], &A[0], sizeof A[0]);

You can play with this layout at http://codepad.org/2rCJA0cx

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+1: Not to mention that if you modify the structure x later on, you will be sure not to break anything. –  FelixCQ Nov 8 '11 at 9:26

You can use a cast:

(struct x)(B[0]) = A[0];
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